arbitrarily


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ar·bi·trar·y

 (är′bĭ-trĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Determined by chance, whim, or impulse, and not by necessity, reason, or principle: stopped at the first motel we passed, an arbitrary choice.
2. Based on or subject to individual judgment or preference: The diet imposes overall calorie limits, but daily menus are arbitrary.
3. Law Relating to a decision made by a court or legislature that lacks a grounding in law or fact: an arbitrary penalty.
4. Not limited by law; despotic: the arbitrary rule of a dictator.

[Middle English arbitrarie, from Latin arbitrārius, from arbiter, arbitr-, arbiter; see arbiter.]

ar′bi·trar′i·ly (-trâr′ə-lē) adv.
ar′bi·trar′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.arbitrarily - in a random mannerarbitrarily - in a random manner; "the houses were randomly scattered"; "bullets were fired into the crowd at random"
Translations
بِصورَة إعْتِباطِيَّة
svévolně
af geîòótta, gerræîislega
gelişigüzelkeyfî olarak

arbitrarily

[ˈɑːbɪtrərɪlɪ] ADVarbitrariamente

arbitrarily

[ˌɑːrbɪˈtrɛərɪli] adv [choose, decide] → arbitrairement

arbitrarily

advwillkürlich, arbiträr (geh)

arbitrarily

[ˈɑːbɪtrərəlɪ] advarbitrariamente

arbitrary

(ˈaːbitrəri) adjective
not decided by rules or laws but by a person's own opinion. He made a rather arbitrary decision to close the local cinema without consulting other people.
ˈarbitrarily adverb
References in classic literature ?
But the money with which I might improve them both is to be arbitrarily taken away from me, if I am not a married man on the third of May.
For instance, why may not any portion of a new confederacy a year or two hence arbitrarily secede again, precisely as portions of the present Union now claim to secede from it?
If we will arbitrarily suppose the contrary, we may deduce any inferences we please from the supposition; for it is certainly possible, by an injudicious exercise of the authorities of the best government that ever was, or ever can be instituted, to provoke and precipitate the people into the wildest excesses.
It was this maddening course of being shouted at, checked without rhyme or reason, arbitrarily chased out of my cabin, suddenly called into it, sent flying out of his pantry on incomprehensible errands, that accounted for the growing wretchedness of his expression.
The only reason why they were ever thus arbitrarily distinguished may be attributed to the singular fact, that their existence was altogether unknown to the world until the year 1791, when they were discovered by Captain Ingraham, of Boston, Massachusetts, nearly two centuries after the discovery of the adjacent islands by the agent of the Spanish Viceroy.
For which reason the art of money-getting seems to be chiefly conversant about trade, and the business of it to be able to tell where the greatest profits can be made, being the means of procuring abundance of wealth and possessions: and thus wealth is very often supposed to consist in the quantity of money which any one possesses, as this is the medium by which all trade is conducted and a fortune made, others again regard it as of no value, as being of none by nature, but arbitrarily made so by compact; so that if those who use it should alter their sentiments, it would be worth nothing, as being of no service for any necessary purpose.
But the cruelest habit the modern prophecy-savans have, is that one of coolly and arbitrarily fitting the prophetic shirt on to the wrong man.
Laws of motion of any kind become comprehensible to man only when he examines arbitrarily selected elements of that motion; but at the same time, a large proportion of human error comes from the arbitrary division of continuous motion into discontinuous elements.
A naturalist, struck by a parallelism of this nature in any one class, by arbitrarily raising or sinking the value of the groups in other classes (and all our experience shows that this valuation has hitherto been arbitrary), could easily extend the parallelism over a wide range; and thus the septenary, quinary, quaternary, and ternary classifications have probably arisen.
Chacao was formerly the principal port in the island; but many vessels having been lost, owing to the dangerous currents and rocks in the straits, the Spanish government burnt the church, and thus arbitrarily compelled the greater number of inhabitants to migrate to S.
Defoe was born in London about 1660, the son of James Foe, a butcher, to whose name the son arbitrarily and with characteristic eye to effect prefixed the 'De' in middle life.
In one instance, on a line arbitrarily chosen, the depth did not vary more than one foot in thirty rods; and generally, near the middle, I could calculate the variation for each one hundred feet in any direction beforehand within three or four inches.