arbitrational


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arbitrational

(ˌɑːbɪˈtreɪʃənəl)
adj
relating to, involving, or resulting from arbitration
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.arbitrational - relating to or resulting from arbitrationarbitrational - relating to or resulting from arbitration; "the arbitral adjustment of the controversy"; "an arbitrational settlement"
References in periodicals archive ?
EDI"), has entered into a binding term sheet with Altergy Systems ("Altergy") that resolves the outstanding legal challenges related to the May 2014 arbitrational panel award issued in favor of Altergy.
This, in turn, makes it difficult to have much faith in the arbitrational skills and constitutional expertise of the voting public.
Whilst it's early days in terms of the DIFC, which is I think very much the leader in this, the potential upside of using the DIFC or other arbitrational courts, which certainly warrants contractors looking at it, is that once you get your award, you can effectively, convert that into an Emirati court judgement, and theoretically, you should be able to enforce in other GCC states," he explained.
The main arbitrational tribunal at the national level in the United States is the American Arbitration Association (AAA) (35).
The media immediately speculated that not only bad Gaddafi demanded--and received--another assortment of apologies for the many Swiss injustices; but also that the Swiss foreign minister cut a deal with Gaddafi, which could mean that an independent arbitrational tribunal will once again investigate what happened to Hannibal in Geneva.
Separate chapters address conflicts between national courts across borders, conflicts between arbitrational tribunals and between such tribunals and national courts in commercial arbitration and in mixed investment arbitration between states and foreign investors, and conflicts between tribunals adjudicating disputes on the plane of public international law and between such tribunals and national courts.
In other words, the obligatory solution to controversy is now accepted more diffusely among the states, which are therefore more inclined to recognize both the right of the other party in the controversy to unilaterally submit to a jurisdictional or arbitrational body and the binding nature of the decisions made by that body.
This must follow from the institutionalisation of the dichotomy of the human and natural sciences, in which the human subject becomes an object of the arbitrational judgement of those who hold the political power over institutional controls.