arbitress

arbitress

(ˈɑːbɪtrɪs)
n
(Law) a female arbitrator

arbitratrix, arbitress

a female arbiter.
See also: Agreement
References in classic literature ?
I passed it as negligently as I did the pollard willow opposite to it: I had no presentiment of what it would be to me; no inward warning that the arbitress of my life--my genius for good or evil--waited there in humble guise.
they but now who seemd In bigness to surpass Earths Giant Sons Now less then smallest Dwarfs, in narrow room Throng numberless, like that Pigmean Race Beyond the INDIAN Mount, or Faerie Elves, Whose midnight Revels, by a Forrest side Or Fountain fome belated Peasant sees, Or dreams he sees, while over head the Moon Sits Arbitress, and neerer to the Earth Wheels her pale course, they on thir mirth & dance Intent, with jocond Music charm his ear; At once with joy and fear his heart rebounds.
And thus he continued on, while my colour came and went several times, with indignation, to hear our noble country, the mistress of arts and arms, the scourge of France, the arbitress of Europe, the seat of virtue, piety, honour, and truth, the pride and envy of the world, so contemptuously treated.
It was clear that she had been a very desirable and distinguished figure, the mistress of her little section of the world; but more than that, she was the person of all others who seemed to him the arbitress of life, the woman whose judgment was naturally right and steady, as his had never been in spite of all his culture.
In her role as ventura, Morgana acts as the arbitress of the series of chances (venture) of which acentric romance narrative is composed.
Faery Elves Whose midnight Revels, by a Forest side Or Fountain some belated Peasant sees, Or dreams he sees, while overhead the Moon Sits Arbitress, and nearer to the Earth Wheels her pale course: they on their mirth and dance Intent, with jocund Music charm his ear; At once with joy and fear his heart rebounds.
Following closely the progress of de Pisan's texts through a succession of English printers, translators, and editors (including, most notably, Caxton, Pynson, Thynne, and Pepwell), Summit argues convincingly that the position of cultural arbitress which de Pisan claimed for the woman writer was arrogated by these intermediaries to an emerging aristocratic community of male courtiers.