arbovirus

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ar·bo·vi·rus

 (är′bə-vī′rəs)
n.
Any of a large group of RNA viruses that are transmitted by arthropods, such as mosquitoes and ticks, and include the causative agents of encephalitis, yellow fever, and dengue.

[ar(thropod-)bo(rne) virus.]

ar′bo·vi′ral adj.
ar′bo·vi·rol′o·gy (är′bō-vĭ-rŏl′ə-jē) n.

arbovirus

(ˈɑːbəʊˌvaɪrəs)
n
(Microbiology) any one of a group of viruses that cause such diseases as encephalitis and dengue and are transmitted to humans by arthropods, esp insects and ticks
[C20: from ar(thropod-)bo(rne) virus]

ar•bo•vi•rus

(ˈɑr bəˌvaɪ rəs)

n., pl. -rus•es.
any of several togaviruses that are transmitted by bloodsucking arthropods, as ticks, fleas, or mosquitoes, and may cause encephalitis, yellow fever, or dengue fever.
[1955–60; ar(thropod)-bo(rne) virus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arbovirus - a large heterogeneous group of RNA viruses divisible into groups on the basis of the virions; they have been recovered from arthropods, bats, and rodents; most are borne by arthropods; they are linked by the epidemiologic concept of transmission between vertebrate hosts by arthropod vectors (mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, midges, etc.) that feed on blood; they can cause mild fevers, hepatitis, hemorrhagic fever, and encephalitis
virus - (virology) ultramicroscopic infectious agent that replicates itself only within cells of living hosts; many are pathogenic; a piece of nucleic acid (DNA or RNA) wrapped in a thin coat of protein
Bunyaviridae - a large family of arboviruses that affect a wide range of hosts (mainly vertebrates and arthropods)
Togaviridae - a family of arboviruses carried by arthropods
Flaviviridae - a family of arboviruses carried by arthropods
Arenaviridae - a family of arborviruses carried by arthropods
Rhabdoviridae - a family of arborviruses carried by arthropods
Reoviridae - a family of arboviruses carried by arthropods
References in periodicals archive ?
An overview of arbovirology in Brazil and neighbouring countries.
Blood samples collected during June 1, 2014-June 30, 2015, were stored at -20[degrees]C and sent to the Department of Arbovirology and Hemorrhagic Fevers, Institute Evandro Chagas (Belem, Brazil), to be evaluated for CHIKV by an IgM-capture ELISA (MAC ELISA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA).
James Wood, director of the Cambridge Veterinary School's infectious diseases consortium, and Professor Philip Mellor, head of the Department of Arbovirology at the Pirbright Laboratory, joined with the Horse Trust yesterday in outlining the potential impact of AHS in Britain.