archaic


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ar·cha·ic

 (är-kā′ĭk) also ar·cha·i·cal (-ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. also Archaic Relating to, being, or characteristic of a much earlier, often more primitive period, especially one that develops into a classical stage of civilization: an archaic bronze statuette; Archaic Greece.
2. No longer current or applicable; antiquated: archaic laws. See Synonyms at old.
3. Relating to, being, or characteristic of words and language that were once in regular use but are now relatively rare and suggestive of an earlier style or period.
4.
a. Relating to or being an early or premodern evolutionary form of an organism or group of organisms: archaic vertebrates.
b. Relating to or being an early form of Homo sapiens or a closely related species, such as Neanderthal, that is anatomically distinct from modern humans.
5. Archaic Relating to a Native American culture prevalent throughout much of North America from about 8000 bc to about 1000 bc, characterized especially by the development of Mesolithic tools and by the increased reliance on smaller game animals as the large Pleistocene mammals became extinct.
n.
A member of an archaic population of Homo.

[Greek arkhāïkos, old-fashioned, from arkhaios, ancient, from arkhē, beginning, from arkhein, to begin.]

ar·cha′i·cal·ly adv.

archaic

(ɑːˈkeɪɪk)
adj
1. belonging to or characteristic of a much earlier period; ancient
2. out of date; antiquated: an archaic prison system.
3. (Linguistics) (of an idiom, vocabulary, etc) characteristic of an earlier period of a language and not in ordinary use
[C19: from French archaïque, from Greek arkhaïkos, from arkhaios ancient, from arkhē beginning, from arkhein to begin]
arˈchaically adv

ar•cha•ic

(ɑrˈkeɪ ɪk)

adj.
1. marked by the characteristics of an earlier period; antiquated: archaic ideas.
2. (of a linguistic form) commonly used in an earlier time but rare in present-day usage except to suggest an older time: used in this dictionary to indicate a word not current since c1900.
3. forming the earliest stage: an archaic period of technology.
4. primitive; ancient: an archaic form of animal life.
[1825–35; (< French) < Greek archaïkós antiquated, old-fashioned =archaî(os) old + -ikos -ic]
ar•cha′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.archaic - so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier periodarchaic - so extremely old as seeming to belong to an earlier period; "a ramshackle antediluvian tenement"; "antediluvian ideas"; "archaic laws"
old - of long duration; not new; "old tradition"; "old house"; "old wine"; "old country"; "old friendships"; "old money"
2.archaic - little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral typearchaic - little evolved from or characteristic of an earlier ancestral type; "archaic forms of life"; "primitive mammals"; "the okapi is a short-necked primitive cousin of the giraffe"
early - being or occurring at an early stage of development; "in an early stage"; "early forms of life"; "early man"; "an early computer"

archaic

adjective
1. old, ancient, antique, primitive, bygone, olden (archaic) archaic sculpture and porcelain
old new, present, recent, current, modern, contemporary
2. old-fashioned, obsolete, out of date, antiquated, outmoded, passé, old hat, behind the times, superannuated These archaic practices are advocated by people of limited outlook.
old-fashioned new, latest, modern, fresh, novel, with it (informal), up-to-date, state-of-the-art, up-to-the-minute, modish, newfangled

archaic

adjective
1. Belonging to, existing, or occurring in times long past:
2. Of a style or method formerly in vogue:
Translations
antiikkinenvanhahtava
gamaldags

archaic

[ɑːˈkeɪɪk] ADJarcaico

archaic

[ɑːrˈkeɪɪk] adj [law, practice, system, language, society] → archaïque

archaic

adj word etcveraltet, archaisch (spec); (inf: = ancient) → vorsintflutlich; my car is getting rather archaicmein Auto wird allmählich museumsreif

archaic

[ɑːˈkeɪɪk] adjarcaico/a
References in classic literature ?
And yet, truly, they are already of but archaic interest.
He spoke to Philip in correct, rather archaic English, having learned it from a study of the English classics, not from conversation; and it was odd to hear him use words colloquially which Philip had only met in the plays of Shakespeare.
I began to employ in my own work the archaic words that I fancied most, which was futile and foolish enough, and I formed a preference for the simpler Anglo-Saxon woof of our speech, which was not so bad.
If you've got a fault in the world, Sandy, it is that you are a shade too archaic.
The truth is, Alisande, these archaics are a little TOO simple; the vocabulary is too limited, and so, by consequence, descriptions suffer in the matter of variety; they run too much to level Saharas of fact, and not enough to picturesque detail; this throws about them a certain air of the monotonous; in fact the fights are all alike: a couple of people come together with great random -- random is a good word, and so is exegesis, for that matter, and so is holocaust, and de- falcation, and usufruct and a hundred others, but land
She glanced at the writing-table heaped with books, opened a volume of the "Contes Drolatiques," made a wry face over the archaic French, and sighed: "What learned things you read
It trained his ear and gave him a fine appreciation for noble English; withal it introduced into his mind much that was archaic and obsolete.
It suggested, rather, some archaic headdress of Persia or Babylon.
An interesting innovation, diversely judged at the time and since, was Spenser's deliberate employment of rustic and archaic words, especially of the Northern dialect, which he introduced partly because of their appropriateness to the imaginary characters, partly for the sake of freshness of expression.
Really, you are too archaic for words," said an Oddity in an alley-way.
It showed dimly the crude shape of a sabre hilt and a shortened blade; and was inscribed in false archaic lettering, "The Sign of the Broken Sword.
No, Bunny, it's principally in the shape of archaic ornaments, whose value, I admit, is largely extrinsic.