archaic human


Related to archaic human: Anatomically modern humans

archaic human

n.
An archaic Homo sapiens.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the site has links to an audio feed of the background microwave radiation generated by the Big Bang, live pictures of the sun, webcams showing gorillas, pandas, and bees, and even live video of archaic human lifestyles like monks praying in a monastery.
In addition to carefully arranged burials of Archaic human adults and children, he mentioned that about one third of the burials included such materials as red ocher, weapons, tools and the bodies of dogs.
Archaic human burials are seldom recovered on the Southern High Plains of Texas (Jurgens 1979; Owsley et al.
Perhaps the first occupants of Australia were an archaic human species, though fully modern Homo sapiens appeared there later and nothing in the new findings, scientists said, changes the identification of today's aborigines as Homo sapiens.
However, comparison with both the Middle Palaeolithic immature humerus of Jebel Irhoud (a late archaic human from Morocco: Hublin et al.
Archaic human fossils from that region, mainly described in Chinese publications, look like Neandertals in some respects.
The brain case appears low for an archaic human and shows significant widening toward the middle.
Neanderthals, our ancestors and other archaic human species probably overlapped.
This tells us that archaic humans were a lot more innovative than we give them credit for," says archaeologist Mark White of Durham University in England.
Underlying it is the social evolutionary thinking that permeates Western thinking, which was shaped within the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century intellectual climate and which still, after all these years, albeit mostly on an unconscious level, has consequences for archaeology; simple technologies belong to archaic humans.
The skull at the center of this study, known as Xujiayao 15, was found along with an assortment of other human teeth and bone fragments, all of which seemed to have characteristics typical of an early non-Neandertal form of late archaic humans.
About 400 to 500 thousand years ago, in the heart of the Pleistocene, archaic humans split off from other groups of that period living in Africa and East Asia, ultimately settling in Eurasia, where they evolved characteristics that would come to define the Neandertal lineage.