archiphoneme

Related to archiphoneme: Phonemes

archiphoneme

(ˈɑːkɪˌfəʊniːm; ˌɑːkɪˈfəʊniːm)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics an abstract linguistic unit representing two or more phonemes when the distinction between these has been neutralized: conventionally shown by a capital letter within slashes, as /T/ for /t/ and /d/ in German Rat and Rad
Translations

archiphoneme

[ˈɑːkɪˌfəʊniːm] Narchifonema m
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References in periodicals archive ?
The study of rhotics, a class of sounds of the archiphoneme /R/, has given rise to many discussions in the field of linguistic investigation (7).
Following Dieterman (2008), the alveolar nasal could be regarded as an archiphoneme in morpheme-final position, always assimilating in place of articulation to the following segment.
They therefore presuppose that there is still signification beyond presence and absence, meaning that nonpresence still signifies something, it posits itself as an "arche-trace," a sort of archiphoneme between presence and absence.
As seen in (60a), the vowel height features of the root shift onto the prefix, here the class 3 archiphoneme /U-/:
In order to avoid such connotations, and after considering the possibility of surlecteur as a terre to replace lecteur moyen, only to abandon it because it implied the very sort of overinterpretation he was to criticize in Jakobson and Levi-Strauss's reading of Baudelaire, he came up with archilecteur, based on the linguistic model of archiphoneme, an entirely neutral term (at least in principle: its purpose is in fact to figure neutrality) designating a phoneme the function of which is to neutralize the potential phonetic discord resulting from the juxtaposition of adjacent incompatible phonemes.
In this book the morphological operations involved in such forms as these are neither described nor explained; their final /-b-, -g-, -r-/ archiphonemes of neutralization are recognized only in their trivial surface realizations and then assigned to the initials of the morphemes that follow in the composita in question.
Before voiceless consonants, the archiphonemes "stops" (/p-m/, /t-n/, /n/,/k-n/) are realized by voiceless allophones, in other environments, by voiced allophones.
Yet the Arab scholars who devised the system of harakat were in fact basing themselves on a phonemic principle: the vowel qualities of fath, damm, and kasr are essentially archiphonemes capable of a variety of phonetic realizations.
This change is reflected in the exclusion of the letter for voiced g from the short alphabet, in which represents both archiphonemes.