ardor


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ar·dor

 (ar′dər)
n.
Intensity of emotion, especially strong desire, enthusiasm, or devotion. See Synonyms at passion.

[Middle English ardour, from Old French, from Latin ārdor, from ārdēre, to burn; see as- in Indo-European roots.]

ar•dor

(ˈɑr dər)

n.
1. great warmth of feeling; fervor.
2. intense devotion; zeal.
3. burning heat.
Also, esp. Brit., ar′dour.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin, =ārd(ēre) to burn + -or -or1]
usage: See -or1.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ardor - a feeling of strong eagerness (usually in favor of a person or cause); "they were imbued with a revolutionary ardor"; "he felt a kind of religious zeal"
avidity, avidness, eagerness, keenness - a positive feeling of wanting to push ahead with something
2.ardor - intense feeling of loveardor - intense feeling of love              
love - a strong positive emotion of regard and affection; "his love for his work"; "children need a lot of love"
3.ardor - feelings of great warmth and intensityardor - feelings of great warmth and intensity; "he spoke with great ardor"
passion, passionateness - a strong feeling or emotion
zeal - excessive fervor to do something or accomplish some end; "he had an absolute zeal for litigation"
Translations

ar·dor

n. ardor, sensación quemante.
References in classic literature ?
When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men's weapons will grow dull and their ardor will be damped.
Their ardor alternated between a vague ideal and the common yearning of womanhood; so that the one was disapproved as extravagance, and the other condemned as a lapse.
While I was in the full flush of this ardor there came to see our school, one day, a Mexican gentleman who was studying the American system of education; a mild, fat, saffron man, whom I could almost have died to please for Cervantes' and Don Quixote's sake, because I knew he spoke their tongue.