argumentation


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ar·gu·men·ta·tion

 (är′gyə-mĕn-tā′shən)
n.
1. The presentation and elaboration of an argument or arguments.
2. Deductive reasoning in debate.
3. A debate.

argumentation

(ˌɑːɡjʊmɛnˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Logic) the process of reasoning methodically
2. a less common word for argument2, argument3

ar•gu•men•ta•tion

(ˌɑr gyə mɛnˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the process of developing or presenting an argument; reasoning.
2. the premises and conclusion so set forth.
3. discussion; debate; disputation.
[1400–50; (< Middle French) < Latin]
ar`gu•men•ta′tious, adj.

Argumentation


Obsolete, a statement that is nonsensical or illogical.
Obsolete, a statement open to more than one interpretation; an ambiguity.
an agreement or correspondence in particular features between things otherwise dissimilar; the inference that if two things agree with each other in one or more respects, they will probably agree in yet other respects. — analogous, adj.
a contradiction.
a method of argument in which the proposition to be established is emphasized through the disproving of its contradiction; reductio ad absurdum.apagogic, adj.
a person who defends, in speech or writing, a faith, doctrine, idea, or action.
reasoning or arguing in a circle.
the belief in and use of conciliation in an argument. — conhciliationist, n. — conciliatory, adj.
Obsolete, controversy or argument. — disceptator, n.
a controversial debate or discussion; a dispute. See also speech. — disputant, n.
Obsolete, the act of dissenting or disagreeing. — dissenter, n.
a difference of opinion.
a stubborn attachment to a theory or doctrine without regard to its practicability. Also spelled doctrinairism. — doctrinaire, n., adj.
1. a statement of a point of view as if it were an established fact.
2. the use of a system of ideas based upon insufficiently examined premises. — dogmatist, n.dogmatic, adj.
a method of induction in which enumeration of particulars leads to the inferred generalization. — epagogic, adj.
a syllogism whose premises are the conclusion of a preceding syllogism.
the practice or habit of quibbling and wrangling; sophistical reasoning. — ergotize, v.
1. a participant in an argument or controversy.
2. the art of disputation. — eristic, eristical, adj.
the art and study of argumentation and formal debate. — forensic, adj.
a method of argument in which postulates or assumptions are made that remain to be proven or that lead the arguers to discover the proofs themselves. — heuristic, adj.
1. a principle or proposition that is assumed for the sake of argument or that is taken for granted to proceed to the proof of the point in question.
2. a system or theory created to account for something that is not understood. — hypothesist, hypothetist, n. — hypothetic, hypothetical, adj.
1. a person who is pedantic in argument.
2. a person whose logic is less valid than he thinks.
Euclid of Megara’s Socratic school of philosophy, known for the use of logical paradox and near-specious subtleties.
a hatred of argument, debate, or reasoning. — misologist, n.
the laws of logic; the science of the intellect. — noetic, adj.
the use of argument intended to prevent enlightenment or to hinder the process of knowledge and wisdom. Also spelled obscuranticism. — obscurantist, n.obscurant, obscurantic, adj.
deliberate interference with the progress of an argument. — obstructionist, n.obstructionistic, adj.
the proposing of paradoxical opinions; speaking in paradoxes. — paradoxer, n.
a method or process of reasoning which contradicts logical rules or formulas, especially the use of a faulty syllogism (the formal fallacy). — paralogist, n. — paralogistic, adj.
Rare. related to a love of controversy and argument. — philopolemist, n.
one who uses Talmudic dialectic; a subtle reasoner. — pilpulistic, adj.
a skilled debater in speech or writing. — polemical, adj.
the art of dispute or argument. — polemic, n., adj.polemically, n., adv.
a series of syllogisms set up systematically.
anticipating an opponent’s argument and answering it before it can be made. See also future. — proleptic, adj.
a false syllogism whose conclusion does not follow from its premises.
a nice or fine point, as in argument; a subtlety. — quodlibetal, adj.
a person who likes to talk about or dispute fine points or quodlibets.
Obsolete, the act or process of refuting or disproving. — redargutory, adj.
a person who decides a matter when the parties to it are in conflict; an umpire or judge.
the tendency to concentrate on a single part of an argument and to ignore or exclude all complicating factors. — simplistic, adj.
1. a specious argument for displaying ingenuity in reasoning or for deceiving someone.
2. any false argument or fallacy. — sophister, n.sophistic, adj.
1. Ancient Greece. a teacher of rhetoric, philosophy, etc; hence, a learned person.
2. one who is given to the specious arguments often used by the sophists.
1. the teachings and ways of teaching of the Greek sophists.
2. specious or fallacious reasoning, as was sometimes used by the sophists.
a form of reasoning in which two statements are made and a logical conclusion is drawn from them. See also logic. — syllogistic, adj.
the state or quality of being forceful, incisive, or penetrating, as in words or an argument. — trenchant, adj.
hair-splitting, as in argument; the making of overly fine points.

Argumentation

 

chop logic See NIT-PICKING.

devil’s advocate One who argues an opposing cause or who takes the negative side of a case, primarily for the sake of argument. This expression derives from the custom in the Roman Catholic Church of appointing an advocatus diaboli, more properly known as promotor fidei ‘protector of the faith,’ whose task it is to argue the case against persons proposed for canonization.

wrangle for an ass’s shadow See NITPICKING.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.argumentation - a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposalargumentation - a discussion in which reasons are advanced for and against some proposition or proposal; "the argument over foreign aid goes on and on"
give-and-take, discussion, word - an exchange of views on some topic; "we had a good discussion"; "we had a word or two about it"
logomachy - argument about words or the meaning of words
2.argumentation - a course of reasoning aimed at demonstrating a truth or falsehood; the methodical process of logical reasoning; "I can't follow your line of reasoning"
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
line of inquiry, line of questioning - an ordering of questions so as to develop a particular argument
casuistry - argumentation that is specious or excessively subtle and intended to be misleading
policy - a line of argument rationalizing the course of action of a government; "they debated the policy or impolicy of the proposed legislation"

argumentation

noun
The presentation of an argument or arguments:
Translations

argumentation

[ˌɑːgjʊmənˈteɪʃən] Nargumentación f, argumentos mpl

argumentation

[ˌɑːrgjʊmɛnˈteɪʃən] n (= argument, debate) → argumentation f

argumentation

nArgumentation f, → Beweisführung f; (= discussion)Diskussion f; an ingenious piece of argumentationeine geniale Beweisführung
References in classic literature ?
Which I meantersay, Pip," Joe now observed in a manner that was at once expressive of forcible argumentation, strict confidence, and great politeness, "as I hup and married your sister, and I were at the time what you might call (if you was anyways inclined) a single man.
Which it is well beknown to yourself, Pip," returned Joe, strengthening his former mixture of argumentation, confidence, and politeness, "that it were the wish of your own hart.
But Newman's mildly-syllabled argumentation seemed to press, and press, and presently he averted his eyes.
Her argumentation would puzzle him and cast him down for a time.
He looked at the floor and moved his head and hands in accompaniment to some inward argumentation.
It is also necessary to distinguish between "arguing about principles" and "arguing about particular cases (in which principles are entered as arguments)"--about, say, whether lying in a genuine argumentation is wrong and whether this particular man in these particular circumstances did wrong to a specific other by lying.
The papers primarily draw on philosophical issues about argumentation and the reasoning necessary to consider rhetorical issues arising in argumentation.
The court did not take into account the paper's argumentation that the article did no directly state that the traffic accident was committed by Saliyev but only assumed that he could have been involved in that accident.
Chapters cover the general principals of argumentation, legal reasoning, briefing, oral arguments, dealing with difficult judges, handling questions, filing a motion for reconsideration, and learning from mistakes, among others topics.
From research observations of activities during a second-grade mathematics problem-centered learning classroom, synergistic argumentation emerged as a class norm for discussing the students' mathematics.
presents very little direct argumentation for her positions from Proverbs itself.
Since Jurgen Habermas articulates one valuable position in support of public argumentation in his theory of communicative action, many Christian theologians have with some justice adopted Habermas' views.