armature

(redirected from armatures)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

ar·ma·ture

 (är′mə-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1. Electricity
a. The rotating part of a dynamo, consisting essentially of copper wire wound around an iron core.
b. The moving part of an electromagnetic device such as a relay, buzzer, or loudspeaker.
c. A piece of soft iron connecting the poles of a magnet.
2. Biology A protective covering, structure, or organ of an animal or a plant, such as teeth, claws, thorns, or the shell of a turtle.
3. A framework serving as a supporting core for the material used to make a sculpture.

[Middle English, armor, from Old French, from Latin armātūra, equipment, from armātus, past participle of armāre, to arm; see arm2.]

armature

(ˈɑːmətjʊə)
n
1. (General Physics) a revolving structure in an electric motor or generator, wound with the coils that carry the current
2. (General Physics) any part of an electric machine or device that moves under the influence of a magnetic field or within which an electromotive force is induced
3. (General Physics) Also called: keeper a soft iron or steel bar placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close the magnetic circuit
4. (General Physics) such a bar placed across the poles of an electromagnet to transmit mechanical force
5. (Art Terms) sculpture a framework to support the clay or other material used in modelling
6. (Biology) the protective outer covering of an animal or plant
7. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) archaic armour
[C15: from Latin armātūra armour, equipment, from armāre to furnish with equipment; see arm2]

ar•ma•ture

(ˈɑr mə tʃər)

n.
1. the protective covering of an animal or plant, or any part serving for defense or offense.
2.
a. the part of a generator that includes the main current-carrying winding, in which the electromotive force is induced.
b. the moving part in an electrical device, as a buzzer or relay, that is activated by a magnetic field.
c. the iron or steel placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close it.
3. a framework on which a clay, wax, or plaster figure is supported while being sculpted.
[1535–45; (< Middle French) < Latin armātūra an outfit, armor <armāt(us), past participle of armāre to arm2]

ar·ma·ture

(är′mə-chər)
1. A rotating part of an electric motor or generator, consisting of wire wound around an iron core. The armature carries the current.
2. A piece of soft iron connecting the poles of a magnet.
3. The part of an electromagnetic device, such as a relay or loudspeaker, that moves or vibrates.

armature

A metal or wood framework used to support a sculptor’s clay, plaster, or wax model.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.armature - coil in which voltage is induced by motion through a magnetic fieldarmature - coil in which voltage is induced by motion through a magnetic field
coil - reactor consisting of a spiral of insulated wire that introduces inductance into a circuit
electric motor - a motor that converts electricity to mechanical work
electromagnet - a temporary magnet made by coiling wire around an iron core; when current flows in the coil the iron becomes a magnet
rotor, rotor coil - the rotating armature of a motor or generator
Translations

armature

[ˈɑːmətjʊəʳ] N
1. (Bot, Elec, Zool) → armadura f; [of dynamo] → inducido m
2. (= supporting framework) → armazón f

armature

n (Elec) → Anker m

armature

[ˈɑːmətjʊəʳ] n (Elec, Sculpture) → armatura
References in periodicals archive ?
They used these branches and a hot glue gun to make armatures.
Sedlak and Manhattan Associates worked together on over 30 projects for companies such as Cabela's, Innotrac, Motors & Armatures, Nordstrom.
As is well know, the reliefs, made between 1959 and 1966, are built on welded steel armatures that support wire-sewn patchworks of old and soot-stained canvas.
The magnet layer functions to hold the removable overlay in place as well as position the PushGate(TM) armatures.
In The Perfect Ride I was looking for completely independent armatures.
His latest sculptures, which combine fluid and jerky contours in organic/machine, anthropomorphic/technomorphic forms, give the impression of skins stretched over moving parts pushing from the inside out; they are born of a process in which the artist cobbles together simple armatures of discarded cans and random found objects and wraps them in layers of foam and tape.
Spanning four decades, these twenty-seven drawings offer a glimpse of the most delicate works produced by an artist famous for her rugged sculptures in heavy canvas, wire, plastic, and other materials on steel armatures.
For a few years now, David Grant has been stretching fabrics and skins over armatures and padding, toying with the interface of surface and what lies beneath, but never before have his works so encouraged viewers to undress them with their eyes.
Useless platforms, passageways that end abruptly, precarious towers of obscure purpose, ruptured cubicles, tortured metal armatures, steel excrescences that look less like decorative motifs than unneeded prosthetics--it all gives the impression of a bomb dropped into a planned community.
The thick viscosity of the materials applied to the armatures pointed to a fundamental commonality that transcended the contrast between the colors.
Contract notice: TSE NA4 CHP-project Shut-off Valves and Piping Armatures Frame Agreement.
Being an advanced class, they had already ticed various clay-building techniques, and they had some experience using simple armatures.