arming


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arm1

arm 1

 (ärm)
n.
1. An upper limb of the human body, connecting the hand and wrist to the shoulder.
2. A part similar to a human arm, such as the forelimb of an animal or a long part projecting from a central support in a machine.
3. Something, such as a sleeve on a garment or a support on a chair, that is designed to cover or support the human arm.
4. A relatively narrow extension jutting out from a large mass: an arm of the sea. See Synonyms at branch.
5. An administrative or functional branch, as of an organization.
6. Power or authority: the long arm of the law.
7. Sports The skill of throwing or pitching a ball well.
Idioms:
an arm and a leg Slang
An excessively high price: a cruise that cost an arm and a leg.
arm in arm
With arms linked together: They walked across the beach arm in arm.
at arm's length
At such a distance that physical or social contact is discouraged: kept the newcomer at arm's length at first.
with open arms
With great cordiality and hospitality.

[Middle English, from Old English earm; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

armed (ärmd) adj.

arm 2

 (ärm)
n.
1. A weapon, especially a firearm: troops bearing arms; ICBMs, bombs, and other nuclear arms.
2. A branch of a military force: infantry, armor, and other combat arms.
3. arms
a. Warfare: a call to arms against the invaders.
b. Military service: several million volunteers under arms; the profession of arms.
4. arms
a. Heraldry Bearings.
b. Insignia, as of a state, an official, a family, or an organization.
v. armed, arm·ing, arms
v.intr.
1. To supply or equip oneself with weaponry.
2. To prepare oneself for warfare or conflict.
v.tr.
1. To equip with weapons: armed themselves with loaded pistols; arm a missile with a warhead; arm a nation for war.
2. To equip with what is needed for effective action: tax advisers who were armed with the latest forms.
3. To provide with something that strengthens or protects: a space reentry vehicle that was armed with a ceramic shield.
4. To prepare (a weapon or electronic system, such as an alarm) for use or operation, as by releasing a safety device.
Idiom:
up in arms
Extremely upset; indignant.

[From Middle English armes, weapons, from Old French, pl. of arme, weapon, from Latin arma, weapons; see ar- in Indo-European roots. Verb, Middle English armen, from Old French armer, from Latin armāre, from arma.]

armed (ärmd) adj.
arm′er n.

ARM

abbr.
adjustable-rate mortgage

arming

(ˈɑːmɪŋ)
n
1. the act of taking arms or providing with arms
2. (Nautical Terms) nautical a greasy substance, such as tallow, packed into the recess at the bottom of a sounding lead to pick up samples of sand, gravel, etc, from the bottom

arming

As applied to explosives, weapons, and ammunition, the changing from a safe condition to a state of readiness for initiation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arming - the act of equiping with weapons in preparation for wararming - the act of equiping with weapons in preparation for war
militarisation, militarization, mobilization, mobilisation - act of assembling and putting into readiness for war or other emergency: "mobilization of the troops"
outfitting - the act of renovating and fitting out a ship
rearmament - the act of arming again; "he opposed the rearmament of Japan after World War II"
disarmament, disarming - act of reducing or depriving of arms; "the disarmament of the aggressor nations must be complete"
References in periodicals archive ?
That's despite the fact that as much as $2 billion in direct arms shipments from the United States flooded into Afghanistan and Pakistan during the 1980s, arming the Taliban and arguably contributing to this previously obscure group of Islamic radicals seizing power in 1994.
Bout's earliest arms deals were in Afghanistan, where in 1995 he was arming the government against the Taliban, which took power the following year.