arrhythmia


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Related to arrhythmia: atrial fibrillation

ar·rhyth·mi·a

 (ə-rĭth′mē-ə)
n.
1. An irregularity in the force or rhythm of the heartbeat: a fatal arrhythmia.
2. A condition characterized by such irregularities: treatments for cardiac arrhythmia.

[New Latin, from Greek arruthmiā, lack of rhythm, from arruthmos, unrhythmical : a-, without; see a-1 + rhuthmos, rhythm; see rhythm.]

arrhythmia

,

arhythmia

or

arythmia

n
(Pathology) any variation from the normal rhythm in the heartbeat. Also called: dysrhythmia
[C19: New Latin, from Greek arrhuthmia, from a-1 + rhuthmos rhythm]

ar•rhyth•mi•a

(əˈrɪð mi ə, eɪˈrɪð-)

n.
any disturbance in the rhythm of the heartbeat.
[1885–90; < Greek arrhythmía. See a-6, rhythm]
ar•rhyth′mic, ar•rhyth′mi•cal, adj.
ar•rhyth′mi•cal•ly, adv.

ar·rhyth·mi·a

(ə-rĭth′mē-ə)
An abnormal rhythm of the heart.

arrhythmia, arhythmia, arythmia, arrythmia

any abnormality in the rhythm of the heartbeat. — arrhythmic, arhythmic, arythmic, arrythmic, adj.
See also: Heart

arrhythmia

Abnormal heart rate or rhythm: tachycardia (faster than normal heart rate) and bradycardia (slower than normal heart rate). It is caused by a disruption of the heart’s conduction system, which generates and transmits electrical impulses in the heart. It can be caused by coronary artery disease, stress, exertion, or some drugs.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heartarrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart
cardiopathy, heart disease - a disease of the heart
flutter - abnormally rapid beating of the auricles of the heart (especially in a regular rhythm); can result in heart block
cantering rhythm, gallop rhythm - cardiac rhythm characterized by the presence of an extra sound; can indicate a heart abnormality
atrial fibrillation - fibrillation of the muscles of the atria of the heart
bradycardia - abnormally slow heartbeat
Adams-Stokes syndrome, atrioventricular block, heart block, Stokes-Adams syndrome - recurrent sudden attacks of unconsciousness caused by impaired conduction of the impulse that regulates the heartbeat
premature ventricular contraction, PVC - irregularity of cardiac rhythm; recurrent occurrences can be a precursor of ventricular fibrillation
tachycardia - abnormally rapid heartbeat (over 100 beats per minute)
ventricular fibrillation - fibrillation of heart muscles resulting in interference with rhythmic contractions of the ventricles and possibly leading to cardiac arrest
Translations

arrhythmia

n (Med) → Arrhythmie f

arrhythmia

[əˈrɪðmɪə] naritmia

ar·rhyth·mi·a

n. arritmia, falta de ritmo, esp. latidos irregulares del corazón.

arrhythmia

n arritmia
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The results indicated that in the 499 arrhythmia episodes that occurred, the onds if the arrhythmia was sustained.