arrogance


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ar·ro·gance

 (ăr′ə-gəns)
n.
The state or quality of being arrogant; overbearing pride.

ar•ro•gance

(ˈær ə gəns)

n.
offensive display of superiority or self-importance; overbearing pride; haughtiness.
Sometimes, ar′ro•gan•cy.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Middle French < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.arrogance - overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiorsarrogance - overbearing pride evidenced by a superior manner toward inferiors
superbia, pride - unreasonable and inordinate self-esteem (personified as one of the deadly sins)
condescension, disdainfulness, superciliousness - the trait of displaying arrogance by patronizing those considered inferior
contemptuousness - the manifestation of scorn and contempt; "every subordinate sensed his contemptuousness and hated him in return"
hubris - overbearing pride or presumption
domineeringness, imperiousness, overbearingness - the trait of being imperious and overbearing
superiority - displaying a sense of being better than others; "he hated the white man's superiority and condescension"
snobbery, snobbishness, snobbism - the trait of condescending to those of lower social status

arrogance

arrogance

noun
Translations
عَجْرَفَه، غَطْرَسَه، عَنْجَهِيَّه
arogancedomýšlivost
arrogancehovmodighed
arogancija
hroki
arogancia
nadutostoholost
arrogans
kibirkendini beğenmişlik

arrogance

[ˈærəgəns] Narrogancia f, prepotencia f (esp LAm)

arrogance

[ˈærəgəns] narrogance f

arrogance

nArroganz f, → Überheblichkeit f

arrogance

[ˈærəgəns] narroganza

arrogant

(ˈӕrəgənt) adjective
extremely proud; thinking that one is much more important than other people.
ˈarrogantly adverb
ˈarrogance noun
References in classic literature ?
He was broad-shouldered and double-jointed, with short curly black hair, and a bluff but not unpleasant countenance, having a mingled air of fun and arrogance From his Herculean frame and great powers of limb he had received the nickname of BROM BONES, by which he was universally known.
They were as little children before Ahab; and yet, in Ahab, there seemed not to lurk the smallest social arrogance.
He wanted to marry well, and having the arrogance to raise his eyes to her, pretended to be in love; but she was perfectly easy as to his not suffering any disappointment that need be cared for.
Chillip does go so far as to say,' pursued the meekest of little men, much encouraged, 'that what such people miscall their religion, is a vent for their bad humours and arrogance.
I went towards them slowly, for my limbs were weak, but with a sense of increasing relief as I drew nearer to them, and a sense of leaving arrogance and untruthfulness further and further behind.
They say he is valiant as the bravest of his order; but stained with their usual vices, pride, arrogance, cruelty, and voluptuousness; a hard-hearted man, who knows neither fear of earth, nor awe of heaven.
I cannot help suspending my narration to reflect a little on the ridiculous speculations of those swelling philosophers, whose arrogance would prescribe laws to nature, and subject those astonishing effects, which we behold daily, to their idle reasonings and chimerical rules.
That is the body of Chrysostom, who was unrivalled in wit, unequalled in courtesy, unapproached in gentle bearing, a phoenix in friendship, generous without limit, grave without arrogance, gay without vulgarity, and, in short, first in all that constitutes goodness and second to none in all that makes up misfortune.
And as he said this, the "eye severe" of the magistrate had lost nothing of its habitual arrogance.
From the very beginning-- from the first moment, I may almost say-- of my acquaintance with you, your manners, impressing me with the fullest belief of your arrogance, your conceit, and your selfish disdain of the feelings of others, were such as to form the groundwork of disapprobation on which succeeding events have built so immovable a dislike; and I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.
the swarm that in the noontide beam were born,' feeling in ourselves the power to direct, this way or that, the forces of Nature--of Nature, of which we form so trivial a part--shall we, in our boundless arrogance, in our pitiful conceit, deny that power to the Ancient of Days?
The unfortunate queen Pomare, incapable of averting the impending calamity, terrified at the arrogance of the insolent Frenchman, and driven at last to despair, fled by night in a canoe to Emio.