arrogancy

arrogancy

(ˈærəɡənsɪ)
n
another name for arrogance
References in classic literature ?
Notwithstanding, so much is true, that the carriage of greatness, in a plain and open manner (so it be without arrogancy and vain glory) doth draw less envy, than if it be in a more crafty and cunning fashion.
He could jut out his neck an ell," it was said, "and cast his venom about four rods; a serpent of countenance very proud, at the sight or hearing of men or cattle, raising his head seeming to listen and look about with great arrogancy.
An article published in the Boston Newsletter called the Courant a "Notorious, Scandalous Paper" full of "Nonsense, Unmannerliness, Raillery, Prophaneness, Immorality, Arrogancy, Calumnies, Lyes.
Those of high rank ought to treat their lessers with affability and courtesy, without arrogancy.
They are charged with calumny--depraving Horace, "taxing him falsely of selfe-loue, arrogancy, impudence, rayling, filching by translation, etc" (5.