arrogate


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Related to arrogate: excoriate, arrogate to oneself

ar·ro·gate

 (ăr′ə-gāt′)
tr.v. ar·ro·gat·ed, ar·ro·gat·ing, ar·ro·gates
1. To take or claim for oneself without right; appropriate: "That's how my cousin came to don the hand-tailored suits and to arrogate to himself the glamorous responsibility for ushering to their tables big-name customers" (Philip Roth). See Synonyms at appropriate.
2. To ascribe on behalf of another in an unwarranted manner: "The Platt Amendment of 1901 arrogated to the United States the right to intervene in Cuba in case of threats to its independence or American lives or property" (Walter McDougall).

[Latin arrogāre, arrogāt- : ad-, ad- + rogāre, to ask; see reg- in Indo-European roots.]

ar′ro·ga′tion n.
ar′ro·ga′tive adj.
ar′ro·ga′tor n.

arrogate

(ˈærəˌɡeɪt)
vb
1. (tr) to claim or appropriate for oneself presumptuously or without justification
2. (tr) to attribute or assign to another without justification
[C16: from Latin arrogāre, from rogāre to ask]
ˌarroˈgation n
arrogative adj
ˈarroˌgator n

ar•ro•gate

(ˈær əˌgeɪt)

v.t. -gat•ed, -gat•ing.
1. to claim unwarrantably or presumptuously; assume or appropriate to oneself without right.
2. to attribute or assign to another; ascribe.
[1530–40; < Latin arrogātus, past participle of arrogāre to claim as a right =ar- ar- + rogāre to ask, propose]
ar`ro•ga′tion, n.
ar′ro•ga`tor, n.

arrogate


Past participle: arrogated
Gerund: arrogating

Imperative
arrogate
arrogate
Present
I arrogate
you arrogate
he/she/it arrogates
we arrogate
you arrogate
they arrogate
Preterite
I arrogated
you arrogated
he/she/it arrogated
we arrogated
you arrogated
they arrogated
Present Continuous
I am arrogating
you are arrogating
he/she/it is arrogating
we are arrogating
you are arrogating
they are arrogating
Present Perfect
I have arrogated
you have arrogated
he/she/it has arrogated
we have arrogated
you have arrogated
they have arrogated
Past Continuous
I was arrogating
you were arrogating
he/she/it was arrogating
we were arrogating
you were arrogating
they were arrogating
Past Perfect
I had arrogated
you had arrogated
he/she/it had arrogated
we had arrogated
you had arrogated
they had arrogated
Future
I will arrogate
you will arrogate
he/she/it will arrogate
we will arrogate
you will arrogate
they will arrogate
Future Perfect
I will have arrogated
you will have arrogated
he/she/it will have arrogated
we will have arrogated
you will have arrogated
they will have arrogated
Future Continuous
I will be arrogating
you will be arrogating
he/she/it will be arrogating
we will be arrogating
you will be arrogating
they will be arrogating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been arrogating
you have been arrogating
he/she/it has been arrogating
we have been arrogating
you have been arrogating
they have been arrogating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been arrogating
you will have been arrogating
he/she/it will have been arrogating
we will have been arrogating
you will have been arrogating
they will have been arrogating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been arrogating
you had been arrogating
he/she/it had been arrogating
we had been arrogating
you had been arrogating
they had been arrogating
Conditional
I would arrogate
you would arrogate
he/she/it would arrogate
we would arrogate
you would arrogate
they would arrogate
Past Conditional
I would have arrogated
you would have arrogated
he/she/it would have arrogated
we would have arrogated
you would have arrogated
they would have arrogated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.arrogate - demand as being one's due or propertyarrogate - demand as being one's due or property; assert one's right or title to; "He claimed his suitcases at the airline counter"; "Mr. Smith claims special tax exemptions because he is a foreign resident"
call for, request, bespeak, quest - express the need or desire for; ask for; "She requested an extra bed in her room"; "She called for room service"
claim, take - lay claim to; as of an idea; "She took credit for the whole idea"
pretend - put forward a claim and assert right or possession of; "pretend the title of King"
requisition - demand and take for use or service, especially by military or public authority for public service
arrogate, assign - make undue claims to having
2.arrogate - make undue claims to having
arrogate, lay claim, claim - demand as being one's due or property; assert one's right or title to; "He claimed his suitcases at the airline counter"; "Mr. Smith claims special tax exemptions because he is a foreign resident"
3.arrogate - seize and take control without authority and possibly with forcearrogate - seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession; "He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town"; "he usurped my rights"; "She seized control of the throne after her husband died"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
annex - take (territory) as if by conquest; "Hitler annexed Lithuania"
appropriate, conquer, seize, capture - take possession of by force, as after an invasion; "the invaders seized the land and property of the inhabitants"; "The army seized the town"; "The militia captured the castle"
preoccupy - occupy or take possession of beforehand or before another or appropriate for use in advance; "the army preoccupied the hills"
hijack - seize control of; "they hijacked the judicial process"
raid - take over (a company) by buying a controlling interest of its stock; "T. Boone Pickens raided many large companies"

arrogate

verb seize, demand, assume, appropriate, presume, usurp, commandeer, expropriate, claim unduly He arrogated the privilege to himself alone.

arrogate

verb
To lay claim to for oneself or as one's right:
Translations
rane til segrive til segtilrane segtilrive segtilta seg

arrogate

[ˈærəʊgeɪt] VT to arrogate sth to o.sarrogarse algo

arrogate

[ˈærəgeɪt] (formal) vt
to arrogate sth to o.s. [+ right, privilege] → s'arroger qch

arrogate

vt to arrogate something to oneselfetw für sich in Anspruch nehmen; titlesich (dat)etw anmaßen
References in periodicals archive ?
Like in previous two years, when the brilliant California Chrome and Arrogate came to conquer, it looks like the Americans have once again trained their sights on Dubai's most famous sporting event.
She cannot arrogate this power of Congress [to herself],' he said.
At the other end of the $16 million affair, Gun Runner - an absolute model of consistency at the top level - demonstrated precisely why he had been voted America's Horse of the Year ahead of world champion Arrogate almost unanimously at Thursday night's Eclipse Awards.
The awards were adjudged jointly by Swiss watchmaking brand Longines and the International Federation of Horseracing Authorities (IFHA) The Longines World's Best Racehorse title went - for the second year in a row - to the American colt Arrogate with a rating of 134.
The Code of Criminal Procedure and cannot arrogate to himself any powers outside its realm.
The statement read: 'This band of impostors - pawns being strung along by devious elements in the ruling party - has the audacity to arrogate the name of our party, the PDP, to its misadventure, using a rented space somewhere in Asokoro, Abuja.
AP) LONDON: Bob Baffert admitted Arrogate just wasn't the "horse he was" after he failed to win the Breeders' Cup, in a race won by Gun Runner.
Bob Baffert had the second and third in Collected and West Coast, but his Arrogate was never in contention on the final start of his illustrious career.
1/4 lengths yesterday (Saturday), sending rival Arrogate to a third
If the real Arrogate turns up and trainer Bob Baffert is ultra confident then for me he wins the last race of his career.
The four-year-old produced another personal best when landing the Woodward in cracking style at Saratoga and can improve past regular foe Arrogate.
Allowing hospitals and other religiously affiliated organizations that are not houses of worship to arrogate to themselves the legal status of a church, and thereby to deprive their legions of employees of ERISA's protections, would be impermissible religious favoritism, giving the institutions a leg up in the competitive marketplace based solely on religion," AU's brief asserts.