art


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art 1

 (ärt)
n.
1.
a. The conscious use of the imagination in the production of objects intended to be contemplated or appreciated as beautiful, as in the arrangement of forms, sounds, or words.
b. Such activity in the visual or plastic arts: takes classes in art at the college.
c. Products of this activity; imaginative works considered as a group: art on display in the lobby.
2. A field or category of art, such as music, ballet, or literature.
3. A nonscientific branch of learning; one of the liberal arts.
4. A skill that is attained by study, practice, or observation: the art of negotiation. See Synonyms at skill.
5.
a. arts Artful devices, stratagems, and tricks.
b. Artful contrivance; cunning.
6. Printing Illustrative material, especially in contrast to text.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin ars, art-; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

art 2

 (ərt; ärt when stressed)
v. Archaic
A second person singular present indicative of be.

[Middle English, from Old English eart; see er- in Indo-European roots.]

art

(ɑːt)
n
1. (Art Terms)
a. the creation of works of beauty or other special significance
b. (as modifier): an art movement.
2. the exercise of human skill (as distinguished from nature)
3. (Art Terms) imaginative skill as applied to representations of the natural world or figments of the imagination
4. (Art Terms)
a. the products of man's creative activities; works of art collectively, esp of the visual arts, sometimes also music, drama, dance, and literature
b. (as modifier): an art gallery. See also arts, fine art
5. (Art Terms) excellence or aesthetic merit of conception or execution as exemplified by such works
6. (Art Terms) any branch of the visual arts, esp painting
7. (Art Terms) (modifier) intended to be artistic or decorative: art needlework.
8. (Art Terms)
a. any field using the techniques of art to display artistic qualities: advertising art.
b. (as modifier): an art film.
9. (Journalism & Publishing) journalism photographs or other illustrations in a newspaper, etc
10. method, facility, or knack: the art of threading a needle; the art of writing letters.
11. the system of rules or principles governing a particular human activity: the art of government.
12. artfulness; cunning
13. get something down to a fine art to become highly proficient at something through practice
[C13: from Old French, from Latin ars craftsmanship]

art

(ɑːt)
vb
archaic (used with the pronoun thou) a singular form of the present tense (indicative mood) of be1
[Old English eart, part of bēon to be]

ART

abbreviation for
(Medicine) assisted reproductive technology

art1

(ɑrt)

n.
1. the quality, production, expression, or realm of what is beautiful or of more than ordinary significance.
2. the class of objects subject to aesthetic criteria, as paintings, sculptures, or drawings.
3. a field or category of art: Dance is an art.
4. the fine arts collectively.
5. any field using the skills or techniques of art: industrial art.
6. (in printed matter) illustrative or decorative material.
7. the principles or methods governing any craft or branch of learning: the art of baking.
8. the craft or trade using these principles or methods.
9. skill in conducting any human activity: the art of conversation.
10. a branch of learning or university study, esp. one of the fine arts or the humanities, as music, philosophy, or literature.
11. arts,
a. (used with a sing. v.) the humanities.
b. (used with a pl. v.) liberal arts.
12. skilled workmanship, execution, or agency, as distinguished from nature.
13. trickery; cunning.
14. studied action; artificiality in behavior.
15. an artifice or artful device: the arts of politics.
16. Archaic. science; learning.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French, acc. of ars < Latin ars (nominative), artem (acc.)]

art2

(ɑrt)

v. Archaic.
2nd pers. sing. pres. indic. of be.
[before 950; Middle English; Old English eart=ear- (see are1) + -t ending of 2nd pers. singular]

-art

var. of -ard: braggart.

art.



pl. arts for 1.
1. article.
2. artillery.
3. artist.

art

- Comes from a base word meaning "put together"; its original general meaning referred to any kind of skill.
See also related terms for skilled.

Art


a spontaneous, intuitive painting technique producing nonformal work characterized by sinuous lines. Also called Action Painting.
the creation of abstract art. — abstractionist, n., adj.
a nonrepresentational style in painting or sculpture.
etching in relief; the opposite of engraving.
Abstract Expressionism.
1. the doctrine that aesthetic standards are autonomous and not subject to political, moral, or religious criteria.
2. used pejoratively to describe those who believe only in “art for art’s sake,” to the exclusion of all other human activities.
an art form, as a story, painting, or sculpture, in which the components have a symbolic, figurative meaning. — allegorist, allegorizer, n. — allegorical, adj.
1. the art of carving works in low relief.
2. a low-relief sculpture. Also spelled anaglyph. — anaglyphic, anaglyptic, adj.
the technique of making drawings and etchings that appear to be carved in low relief. — anaglyptographic, adj.
a distorted image of an object, as in anamorphic art. Also spelled anamorphosis, anamorphosy. — anamorphic, adj.
a cylindrical mirror for correcting the distorted image created by anamorphism.
anamorphism.
Obsolete, anamorphism.
an artist who paints in water colors. Also called water-colorist.
a taste for and imitation of earlier styles, a recurrent phenomenon since ancient times based on the premise that earlier works were somehow purer and simpler. Cf. primitivism.
structural design, especially of a work of art, as a painting or piece of music. See also philosophy.
artistic achievement, quality, or workmanship.
a nonutilitarian theory of art holding that a work of art is an end in itself. — autotelic, adj.
a highly decorated form of art or ornamentation. — baroque, adj.
an artist who specializes in charcoal drawings or sketches.
anything typically Chinese or made in a Chinese manner.
the revival in arts and letters in the sixteenth century in Italy. — cinquecentist, n., adj.
1. formerly, an imitation of Greek and Roman art.
2. currently, a dedication to the principles of that art: clarity of execution, balance, adherence to recognized standards of form, and conscious craftsmanship. — classicist, n.classicistic, adj.
an artist who uses color or who is distinguished by the way in which he uses color.
a movement in 20th-century painting in which several planes of an object in the form of cubes or other solids are presented in an arbitrary arrangement using a narrow range of colors or monochrome. — Cubist, n. — Cubistic, adj.
a person who is well acquainted with culture, as literature, the arts, etc., and who advocates their worth to society.
a revolt by certain 20th-century painters and writers in France, Germany, and Switzerland against smugness in traditional art and Western society; their works, illustrating absurdity through paintings of purposeless machines and collages of discarded materials, expressed their cynicism about conventional ideas of form and their rejection of traditional concepts of beauty. — Dadaist, n.
a painting or other work executed in a messy or unskilled way. — dauber, daubster, n.
a work of art composed of two attached panels.
the use of small juxtaposed dots of color on a canvas. Cf. Pointillism. — divisionist, n., adj.
the art and literature of thirteenth-century Italy. — duecentist, n., adj.
a style that intermixes features borrowed from other artists or differing schools; applied especially when the result is unsuccessful. — eclecticist, n.
the study of the origin, development, and nature of the fine arts.
the condition of being foreign, striking, or unusual in color and design. — exoticist, n.exotic, exotical, adj.
a movement in the 20th century that attempted to express feeling and emotion directly by distorting forms, choosing violent subject matter and harsh colors, and keeping the overall design out of balance. — Expressionist, n.Expressionistic, adj.
the literary or artistic use of fantasy. — fantastic, adj. — fantasticality, fantasticalness, n.
an early movement in 20th-century painting characterized by an emphasis on the use of unmixed bright colors for emotional and decorative effect. — Fauvist, n. — Fauve, n., adj.
a movement of the 20th century attempting to capture in painting the movement, force, and speed of modern industrial life by the simultaneous representation of successive aspects of forms in motion. — Futurist, n.Futuristic, adj.
a room, building, or other place specifically used for the preservation of works of sculpture.
the principles of the paintings, sculptures, stained glass, mosaics, and book illustrations of the period 1200-1450, embracing several disparate styles and emphases. — Gothicist, n.
the forms and ideals of ancient Greek art. See also antiquity.
the description, history, and analysis of symbolic art or artistic symbolism, especially that of the late medieval and Renaissance periods. Also called iconography. — iconologist, n. — iconological, adj.
a movement in the late 19th century in French painting, characterized by the goal of reproducing an impression of a subject by use of reflected light and color and the blurring of outlines. — Impressionist, n., adj.Impressionistic, adj.
a style of art, idiom, custom, mannerism, etc., typical of the Japanese.
a painter of landscapes.
a movement in painting concerned with precision in representing light and shade. — luminarist, n.
1. a movement in painting concerned with effects of light, especially the use of broken color in its full intensity with a minimum of shadow effects, applied especially to many Impressionist and Pointillist artists.
2. a technique of painting employing minute modulations of tone, developed in America (1825-65) by John Singer Sargent, Mary Cassatt, William Merritt Chase, and others. — luminist, n.
1. an overemphasis on any distinctive technique of expression, occurring when the manner of expression obscures the feeling or idea expressed in the work of art; considered by many art critics to be a sign of decadence. — mannerist, n. — manneristic, adj.
2. (usu. cap.) a style, developed between c.1530 and c.1590, marked by deliberate violations of earlier standards of painting in depicting the artist’s idea rather than nature by means of asymmetrical and crowded compositions, elongated and twisted figures, and emphasis upon devices like foreshortening. The style also afïected both architecture and sculpture. — Mannerist, n.
1. Obsolete, an artist whose task it was to draw in red certain words or letters in manuscripts.
2. a painter of miniature pictures or portraits, as on china or ivory, characterized by fineness of detail.
a mode of expression or practice characteristic of modern times. — modernist, n.modernistic, adj.
one who paints or draws in shades or tints of a single color.
a sculpture or monument made from a single large block of stone, as an Egyptian obelisk. — monolithic, adj.
decoration or ornamentation in the Moorish style, distinguished by intricate tracery and bright colors. — Moresque, adj.
the goal of artists who attempt to represent a subject without stylization or interpretation, and to create a mirror for natural beauty. Cf. Verism. Also called Realism. — Naturalist, n.Naturalistic, adj.
a European movement of the late 18th century differing from earlier classical revivals in that it deliberately and consciously imitated antique models such as those found between 1738-56 in Herculaneum, Paestum, and Pompeii. — Neo-Classicist, n. — Neo-Classic, Neo-Classical, adj.
the practice of reviving Hellenism in modern art or life. — Neo-Hellenist, n. — Neo-Hellenistic, adj.
Pointillism.
the art principle of de Still which represented form as horizontal and vertical lines and which excluded all colors except the primaries, black, and white.
a term used to describe a trend away from abstract expressionism toward a subjective expressionism focusing on true-to-life forms, the factual, and easily evident forms.
a painting of a night scene, a genre particularly favored by Whistler. See also music.
a person who advocates the study of the nude body or figure.
the Japanese art of paper folding. — origamist, n.
1. a use of ornament for decorative purposes, especially its overuse.
2. the employment of several traditional architectural and decorative features into the design of interiors, buildings, furniture, etc., influenced by Art Deco and Art Nouveau.
1. an artist who specializes in ornamentation.
2. a person whose work is considered to be ornament rather than art.
a short-lived development of Cubism c.1912 that attempted to enliven the original approach by subordinating the geometrical forms and using unmixed bright colors. — Orphist, n.
an artist who specializes in the use of pastels.
a painter of landscapes.
the art of carving or sculpting in cork.
a picture gallery or place where paintings are kept.
the theory or creation of plastic art.
the practice of painting in the open air to obtain effects of light and atmosphere not possible in a studio, — plein-air, adj.
a style of the late 19th century based upon some Impressionist techniques and the application of scientific theories of the process of vision; begun by Seurat, who gave it the name Divisionism, it consists of using dots of unmixed color side by side so that the viewer’s eye may mix them into the appropriate intermediate color. Also called Neo-Impressionism.Pointillist, n.Pointillistic, adj.
the art of using many or various colors in painting, architecture, etc. — polychromie, polychromatic, adj.polychromatist, n.
a work of art, as a painting, composed of several panels.
British and American art movement of the 1960s which explored antitraditional and often antiesthetic means to present everyday objects and events.
an artist who paints portraits.
1. the process or art of painting portraits.
2. the portrait itself.
3. portraits collectively.
a late 19th-century reaction to Impressionism, emphasizing on one hand the emotional aspect of painting and on the other a return to formal structure; the first led to Expressionism; the second, to Cubism. — Post-Impressionist, n.
the principles of the 19th-century artists and writers who sought to restore the principles and practices thought to be characteristic of Italian art before Raphael. — Pre-Raphaelite, n., adj.
a deliberate affection or triviality of expression in art or literature.
1. the self-conscious return, for inspiration, to the archaic forms produced by non-Western cultures.
2. the practice of painting in a way alien to academic or traditional techniques, often displaying a highly individual naiveté in interpretation and treatment of subjects. Cf. archaism.primitivist, n.primitivistic, adj.
the imitative use of classicism in art and literature, especially shown during the 18th century. — pseudo-classic, adj. — pseudo-classical, adj.
strict adherence to particular concepts, rules, or ideals of form, style, etc., either as formulated by the artist or as dictated by a school with which the artist is allied. See also criticism; language. — purist, n., adj.
the art or process of burning designs on wood or leather, using heated tools. Also called pyrogravure.pyrographer, n.pyrographic, adj.
the art of fifteenth-century Italy. — quattrocentist, n., adj.
1. Naturalism.
2. a movement in the late 19th century stressing common rather than individual characteristics as the basis of reality. Cf. Verism. — Realist, n.
the practice of creating recognizable figures, objects, and natural forms in art. Cf. Abstractism.
still-life or genre painting, especially of trivial or sordid and unsuitable subjects.
Often Derogatory. an artistic and literary style, developed from the baroque, characterized by complex and elaborate ornamentation. — rococo, adj.
the reflection, in art, of a late 18th-century literary and philosophical movement in reaction against the intellectuality and rationality of Neo-Classicism. It produced no single artistic style or characteristic but strongly influenced the ideals of imagination, emotion, and the freedom of expression in other media. — Romanticist, n.
something characteristic of or influenced by Russia, its people, customs, language, etc.
the act of shocking or intent to shock, especially through the media; the practice of using startling but superficial effects, in art, literature, etc., to gain attention. See also literature; media. — sensationalist, n.
the procedure of making prints through the silk-screen process. — serigrapher, n.
a Marxist-inspired artistic and literary theory or doctrine that calls on art and literature to promote the socialist cause and sees the artist, writer, etc. as a servant of the state or, in the words of Stalin, “the engineer of human souls.”
1. statues collectively or a group of statues.
2. the art of making statues. — statuary, adj.
the process of making stereochromes, pictures produced with water glass as a vehicle or preservative coating. Also called waterglass painting. — stereochromic, stereochromatic adj.
the study of particular styles, as in art, literature, etc.
a controversial movement in art and literature between the two World Wars in which the artist attempted to portray, express, or interpret the workings of the subconscious mind; in painting it found expression in two techniques, the naturalistic (Dali) and the abstract (Miró). — Surrealist, n.Surrealistic, adj.
an American movement, founded in 1913, based upon Abstractism in unmixed color, usually involving disklike forms. — synchronist, n.synchronistic, adj.
a movement of the early 1950s which claimed to be in revolt against both Abstractism and naturalism, taking its name from patches of color (Fr. taches) placed on canvas spontaneously and by chance, the result being considered an emotional projection rather than an expression or a symbol. Cf. Abstract Expressionism. — Tachist, Tachiste, n.
a painter who pays special attention to qualities of tone or tint in his work. See also music.
Rare. the study of the art of toreutics.
the art of ivory- and metalworking, especially relief work, embossing, and chasing. — toreutic, adj.
the condition of being beyond the norm of modern. — ultra-modernist, n.ultramodernistic, adj.
a naturalistic approach, especially in portraiture, in which every wrinkle and flaw of the subject is faithfully reproduced; extreme realism. Cf. Naturalism, Realism.Verist, n. — Veristic, adj.
an art movement in England in 1914-15 stimulated by Futurism and by the idea that all artistic creation must begin in a state of strong emotion; its products, intended to establish a form characteristic of the industrial age, tend to use angular, machinelike shapes. — Vorticist, n.
aquarellist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.art - the products of human creativityart - the products of human creativity; works of art collectively; "an art exhibition"; "a fine collection of art"
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
artificial flower - a handmade imitation of a blossom
commercial art - art used for commercial purposes (as in advertising)
creation - an artifact that has been brought into existence by someone
cyberart - art that is produced with the help of computer hardware and software
decoupage - art produced by decorating a surface with cutouts and then coating it with several layers of varnish or lacquer
diptych - a painting or carving (especially an altarpiece) on two panels (usually hinged like a book)
gem, treasure - art highly prized for its beauty or perfection
genre - a class of art (or artistic endeavor) having a characteristic form or technique
graphic art - the arts of drawing or painting or printmaking
grotesque - art characterized by an incongruous mixture of parts of humans and animals interwoven with plants
kitsch - excessively garish or sentimental art; usually considered in bad taste
mosaic - art consisting of a design made of small pieces of colored stone or glass
plastic art - the arts of shaping or modeling; carving and sculpture
triptych - art consisting of a painting or carving (especially an altarpiece) on three panels (usually hinged together)
work of art - art that is a product of one of the fine arts (especially a painting or sculpture of artistic merit)
dance - an artistic form of nonverbal communication
2.art - the creation of beautiful or significant thingsart - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
creation, creative activity - the human act of creating
arts and crafts - the arts of decorative design and handicraft; "they sponsored arts and crafts in order to encourage craftsmanship in an age of mass production"
ceramics - the art of making and decorating pottery
decalcomania - the art of transfering designs from specially prepared paper to a wood or glass or metal surface
decoupage - the art of decorating a surface with shapes or pictures and then coating it with vanish or lacquer
draftsmanship, drawing, drafting - the creation of artistic pictures or diagrams; "he learned drawing from his father"
glyptography - carving or engraving (especially on stones)
gastronomy - the art and practice of choosing and preparing and eating good food
origami - the Japanese art of folding paper into shapes representing objects (e.g., flowers or birds)
painting - creating a picture with paints; "he studied painting and sculpture for many years"
perfumery - the art of making perfumes
printmaking - artistic design and manufacture of prints as woodcuts or silkscreens
sculpture, carving - creating figures or designs in three dimensions
topiary - making decorative shapes by trimming shrubs or trees
Americana - any artifact (such as books or furniture or art) that is distinctive of America
art, fine art - the products of human creativity; works of art collectively; "an art exhibition"; "a fine collection of art"
ground - (art) the surface (as a wall or canvas) prepared to take the paint for a painting
talaria - a winged sandal (as worn by Hermes in Graeco-Roman art)
vocabulary - the system of techniques or symbols serving as a means of expression (as in arts or crafts); "he introduced a wide vocabulary of techniques"
aesthetics, esthetics - (art) the branch of philosophy dealing with beauty and taste (emphasizing the evaluative criteria that are applied to art); "traditional aesthetics assumed the existence of universal and timeless criteria of artistic value"
cinema, film, celluloid - a medium that disseminates moving pictures; "theater pieces transferred to celluloid"; "this story would be good cinema"; "film coverage of sporting events"
expressive style, style - a way of expressing something (in language or art or music etc.) that is characteristic of a particular person or group of people or period; "all the reporters were expected to adopt the style of the newspaper"
tout ensemble, ensemble - an assemblage of parts or details (as in a work of art) considered as forming a whole
expo, exposition, exhibition - a collection of things (goods or works of art etc.) for public display
authenticator, appraiser - one who determines authenticity (as of works of art) or who guarantees validity
idealogue, theoretician, theoriser, theorist, theorizer - someone who theorizes (especially in science or art)
tension - a balance between and interplay of opposing elements or tendencies (especially in art or literature); "there is a tension created between narrative time and movie time"; "there is a tension between these approaches to understanding history"
doldrums, stagnation, stagnancy - a state of inactivity (in business or art etc); "economic growth of less than 1% per year is considered to be economic stagnation"
longueur - a period of dullness or boredom (especially in a work of literature or performing art)
finger-paint - apply colors with one's fingers
fresco - paint onto wet plaster on a wall
distemper - paint with distemper
illuminate - add embellishments and paintings to (medieval manuscripts)
miniate, rubricate - decorate (manuscripts) with letters painted red; "In this beautiful book, all the place names are rubricated"
blazon, emblazon - decorate with heraldic arms
sculpt, sculpture - create by shaping stone or wood or any other hard material; "sculpt a swan out of a block of ice"
paint - make a painting of; "He painted his mistress many times"
paint - make a painting; "he painted all day in the garden"; "He painted a painting of the garden"
repaint - paint again; "He repainted the same scenery many times during his life"
charge - place a heraldic bearing on; "charge all weapons, shields, and banners"
interpret, represent - create an image or likeness of; "The painter represented his wife as a young girl"
depict, picture, show, render - show in, or as in, a picture; "This scene depicts country life"; "the face of the child is rendered with much tenderness in this painting"
illustrate - depict with an illustration
stylise, stylize, conventionalize - represent according to a conventional style; "a stylized female head"
3.art - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observationart - a superior skill that you can learn by study and practice and observation; "the art of conversation"; "it's quite an art"
airmanship, aviation - the art of operating aircraft
eristic - the art of logical disputation (especially if specious)
falconry - the art of training falcons to hunt and return
fortification - the art or science of strengthening defenses
homiletics - the art of preaching
horology - the art of designing and making clocks
minstrelsy - the art of a minstrel
musicianship - artistry in performing music
enology, oenology - the art of wine making
puppetry - the art of making puppets and presenting puppet shows
taxidermy - the art of mounting the skins of animals so that they have lifelike appearance
telescopy - the art of making and using telescopes
ventriloquism, ventriloquy - the art of projecting your voice so that it seems to come from another source (as from a ventriloquist's dummy)
superior skill - more than ordinary ability
4.art - photographs or other visual representations in a printed publicationart - photographs or other visual representations in a printed publication; "the publisher was responsible for all the artwork in the book"
publication - a copy of a printed work offered for distribution
visual communication - communication that relies on vision
illustration - artwork that helps make something clear or attractive
drawing - an illustration that is drawn by hand and published in a book, magazine, or newspaper; "it is shown by the drawing in Fig. 7"

art

noun
1. artwork, style of art, fine art, creativity the first exhibition of such art in the West
2. skill, knowledge, method, facility, craft, profession, expertise, competence, accomplishment, mastery, knack, ingenuity, finesse, aptitude, artistry, artifice (archaic), virtuosity, dexterity, cleverness, adroitness the art of seduction and romance
Quotations
"Art is a jealous mistress" [Ralph Waldo Emerson Conduct of Life]
"All art constantly aspires towards the condition of music" [Walter Pater Studies in the History of the Renaissance]
"Art is a lie that makes us realise the truth" [Pablo Picasso]
"Life is short, the art long" [Hippocrates Aphorisms]
"Art does not reproduce the visible; rather, it makes visible" [Paul Klee Inward Vision]
"Art is a revolt against fate" [André Malraux Les Voix du silence]
"Art is...pattern informed by sensibility" [Herbert Read The Meaning of Art]
"We must have ... art for art's sake ... the beautiful cannot be the way to what is useful, or to what is good, or to what is holy; it leads only to itself" [Victor Cousin Sorbonne lecture, 1818]
"Art is meant to disturb. Science reassures" [Georges Braque Pensées sur l'art]
"True art selects and paraphrases, but seldom gives a verbatim translation" [Thomas Bailey Aldrich Ponkapog Papers]
"Art enlarges experience by admitting us to the inner life of others" [Walter Lippmann The Golden Rule and After]

Art

Art styles and movements  abstract expressionism, abstractionism, Art Deco, Arte Povera, Art Nouveau, Barbizon School, baroque, Der Blaue Reiter, Brücke, classicism, conceptual art, constructivism, cubism, Dada or Dadaism, De Stijl, divisionism, expressionism, Fauvism, futurism, Gothic, Impressionism, Jugendstil, mannerism, minimal art, modernism, Nabis, naturalism, Nazarene, neoclassicism, neoimpressionism, neoplasticism, op art, pointillism, pop art, postimpressionism, postmodernism, Pre-Raphaelite, realism, rococo, Romanesque, romanticism, Suprematism, surrealism, symbolism, synthetism, ukiyo-e, vorticism
Art equipment  acrylic, airbrush, brush, canvas, chalk, charcoal, crayon, drawing paper, easel, fixative, glaze, ground, ink, lay figure, linseed oil, oil paint, paint, paintbox, paintbrush, palette, palette knife, pastel, pencil, sketchbook, spatula, spray gun, varnish, watercolour

art

noun
1. Activity pursued as a livelihood:
Slang: racket.
Archaic: employ.
2. Natural or acquired facility in a specific activity:
Informal: know-how.
Translations
فَنفَنّمَهارَه
uměnídovednostumělecký
kunstkunstart
taidetaideteostaito
umjetnost
művészetművészeti ág
listlist, listgrein
美術
예술
apsukrumasapsukrusgudriaigudrumasgudrus
mākslamākslas-prasme
umenie
umetnost
konst
ศิลปะ
nghệ thuật

art

1 [ɑːt]
A. N
1. (= painting etc) → arte m
the artslas bellas artes
art for art's sakeel arte por el arte
work of artobra f de arte
2. (= skill) → arte m, habilidad f, destreza f; (= technique) → técnica f; (= knack) → maña f; (= gift) → don m, facilidad f
the art of embroideryel arte del bordado
the art of persuasion/seductionel arte de la persuasión/la seducción
see also fine 1
3. (Univ) ArtsFilosofía f y Letras
Faculty of ArtsFacultad f de Filosofía y Letras
see also bachelor, master
4. (= cunning) → arte m
B. CPD art collection Ncolección f de arte
art college Nescuela f de Bellas Artes
art dealer Nmarchante mf
art deco Nart decó m
art exhibition Nexposición f de arte
art form Nmedio m de expresión artística
art gallery N (state-owned) → museo m (de arte); (private) → galería f de arte
art lover Naficionado/a m/f al arte
art nouveau Nmodernismo m
art paper Npapel m cuché
arts and crafts NPLartesanías fpl
art school Nescuela f de Bellas Artes
Arts Council N (Brit) institución pública encargada de la promoción de la cultura y de las actividades artísticas
Arts degree Nlicenciatura f en Letras
Arts student Nestudiante mf de Letras
art student Nestudiante mf de Bellas Artes
see also performance

art

[ˈɑːrt]
n
(= paintings, sculpture etc) → art m
work of art → œuvre f d'art
(= drawing, painting, sculpting etc)
(= skill) → art m
the arts of seduction and romance → l'art de la séduction et de l'amour
the art of survival → l'art de la survie
arts npl
see arts
arts modif
see artsart collection ncollection f d'œuvres d'artart college nécole f des beaux-arts

art

:
art gallery
nKunstgalerie f
art-house
adj attr art filmExperimentalfilm m; art cinema˜ Programmkino nt

art

:
art paper
art school
nKunstakademie or -hochschule f

art

1
n
(= painting etc)Kunst f; the artsdie schönen Künste; art for art’s sakeKunst um der Kunst willen, Kunst als Selbstzweck; (slogan) → L’art pour l’art ? work N c
(= skill)Kunst f; (= physical technique)Geschick nt, → Kunst f; there’s an art to driving this cares gehört ein gewisses Geschick dazu, mit diesem Auto zu fahren; there’s an art to itdas ist eine Kunst; the art of war/governmentdie Kriegs-/Staatskunst; the art of conversation/translationdie Kunst der Unterhaltung/Übersetzung; arts and craftsKunsthandwerk nt, → Kunstgewerbe nt
(= human endeavour)Künstlichkeit f; unspoiled by artunverbildet; are they the products of art or nature?sind sie natürlich oder von Menschenhand geschaffen?; her beauty owes more to art than naturesie verdankt ihre Schönheit mehr der Kunst als der Natur
arts (Univ) → Geisteswissenschaften pl; arts ministerKulturminister(in) m(f); arts subjectgeisteswissenschaftliches Fach ? bachelor, liberal arts
(usu pl: = trick) → List f, → Kunstgriff m
adj attrKunst-; art criticKunstkritiker(in) m(f)

art

[ɑːt]
1. n
a.arte f; (craft) → mestiere m (Scol) (subject) → disegno e storia dell'arte
to study art → fare degli studi artistici
work of art → opera d'arte
see also arts
2. adjd'arte

art

(aːt) noun
1. painting and sculpture. I'm studying art at school; Do you like modern art?; (also adjective) an art gallery, an art college.
2. any of various creative forms of expression. painting, music, dancing, writing and the other arts.
3. an ability or skill; the (best) way of doing something. the art of conversation/war.
ˈartful adjective
clever; having a lot of skill (usually in a bad sense). an artful thief.
ˈartfully adverb
ˈartfulness noun
arts noun plural
(often with capital) languages, literature, history, as opposed to scientific subjects.

art

فَنّ umění kunst Kunst τέχνη arte taide art umjetnost arte 美術 예술 kunst kunst sztuka arte искусство konst ศิลปะ sanat nghệ thuật 艺术

ART

abbr antiretroviral therapy. V. therapy.
References in classic literature ?
She was a great favorite with her mates, being good-tempered and possessing the happy art of pleasing without effort.
He studied French and went to an art school, hoping to develop a faculty he had for drawing.
She spent much of her time in the water since she had acquired finally the art of swimming.
The novice in the military art flew from point to point, retarding his own preparations by the excess of his violent and somewhat distempered zeal; while the more practiced veteran made his arrangements with a deliberation that scorned every appearance of haste; though his sober lineaments and anxious eye sufficiently betrayed that he had no very strong professional relish for the, as yet, untried and dreaded warfare of the wilderness.
Another letter submitted that morning had come from his art agent in Europe.
One,--John Swinnerton by name,--who appears to have been a man of eminence, upheld it, if we have rightly understood his terms of art, to be a case of apoplexy.
It had been wrought, as was easy to perceive, with wonderful skill of needlework; and the stitch (as I am assured by ladies conversant with such mysteries) gives evidence of a now forgotten art, not to be discovered even by the process of picking out the threads.
I was about to say, sir, that-- Art thou a silk-worm?
Yes, the Old Masters often drew badly; they did not care much for truth and exactness in minor details; but after all, in spite of bad drawing, bad perspective, bad proportions, and a choice of subjects which no longer appeal to people as strongly as they did three hundred years ago, there is a SOMETHING about their pictures which is divine--a something which is above and beyond the art of any epoch since--a something which would be the despair of artists but that they never hope or expect to attain it, and therefore do not worry about it.
From the corner of the divan of Persian saddle-bags on which he was lying, smoking, as was his custom, innumerable cigarettes, Lord Henry Wotton could just catch the gleam of the honey-sweet and honey-coloured blossoms of a laburnum, whose tremulous branches seemed hardly able to bear the burden of a beauty so flamelike as theirs; and now and then the fantastic shadows of birds in flight flitted across the long tussore-silk curtains that were stretched in front of the huge window, producing a kind of momentary Japanese effect, and making him think of those pallid, jade-faced painters of Tokyo who, through the medium of an art that is necessarily immobile, seek to convey the sense of swiftness and motion.
Thou, who, to my thinking, art beyond all doubt a dullard, without early rising or night watching or taking any trouble, with the mere breath of knight-errantry that has breathed upon thee, seest thyself without more ado governor of an island, as though it were a mere matter of course.
The meanest mathematician in Spaceland will readily believe me when I assert that the problems of life, which present themselves to the well-educated -- when they are themselves in motion, rotating, advancing or retreating, and at the same time attempting to discriminate by the sense of sight between a number of Polygons of high rank moving in different directions, as for example in a ball-room or conversazione -- must be of a nature to task the angularity of the most intellectual, and amply justify the rich endowments of the Learned Professors of Geometry, both Static and Kinetic, in the illustrious University of Wentbridge, where the Science and Art of Sight Recognition are regularly taught to large classes of the ELITE of the States.