artifice


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ar·ti·fice

 (är′tə-fĭs)
n.
1.
a. Deception or trickery: The purchaser believed that the product was new only by artifice of the seller.
b. Something contrived or made up to achieve an end, especially by deceiving; a stratagem or ruse: "From the beginning, 'compassionate conservatism' was an artifice designed to mask Bush's conservatism from an electorate that did not want a sharp rightward turn" (Jonathan Chait). See Synonyms at wile.
2.
a. Cleverness or ingenuity in making or doing something; art or skill: "Literary artifice is the only means that a writer has at his disposal. How else can he convey his impression of life?" (Harry Levin).
b. An artistic device or convention: artifices such as conceits and puns.

[French, from Old French, craftsmanship, from Latin artificium, from artifex, artific-, craftsman : ars, art-, art; see art1 + -fex, maker; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

artifice

(ˈɑːtɪfɪs)
n
1. a clever expedient; ingenious stratagem
2. crafty or subtle deception
3. skill; cleverness
4. a skilfully contrived device
5. obsolete craftsmanship
[C16: from Old French, from Latin artificium skill, from artifex one possessed of a specific skill, from ars skill + -fex, from facere to make]

ar•ti•fice

(ˈɑr tə fɪs)

n.
1. a clever trick or stratagem.
2. trickery; guile; craftiness.
3. cleverness; ingenuity.
4. a skillful or artful contrivance or expedient.
[1525–35; < Anglo-French < Latin artificium craftsmanship, art, craftiness]
syn: See trick.

artifice

1. skill, ingenuity, or craftiness.
2. Obsolete, the command of a learned trade or skill.
See also: Skill and Craft
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.artifice - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)artifice - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)
tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre, maneuver, manoeuvre - a move made to gain a tactical end

artifice

noun
2. cleverness, skill, facility, invention, ingenuity, finesse, inventiveness, deftness, adroitness a combination of theatrical artifice and dazzling cinematic movement

artifice

noun
1. An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
Translations

artifice

[ˈɑːtɪfɪs] N
1. (= cunning) → habilidad f, ingenio m
2. (= trick) → artificio m, ardid m; (= strategem) → estratagema f

artifice

[ˈɑːrtɪfɪs] nruse f

artifice

n
(= guile)List f no pl
(= stratagem)(Kriegs)list f

artifice

[ˈɑːtɪfɪs] n (frm) (cunning) → abilità, destrezza; (trick) → artificio
References in classic literature ?
When the young man mentioned the artifice he supposed the Indian to have practised on his own nation, the countenance of the listener was veiled in an expression of cautious gravity.
Shelby's dread of his succeeding in recapturing Eliza and her child, and of course the greater her motive for detaining him by every female artifice.
Emma saw its artifice, and returned to her first surmises.
I abhor artifice, particularly in children; it is my duty to show you that tricks will not answer: you will now stay here an hour longer, and it is only on condition of perfect submission and stillness that I shall liberate you then.
Here the stage artifice of the situation presented difficulties which Magdalen had not encountered in the first scene -- and here, her total want of experience led her into more than one palpable mistake.
This garment hung so loosely on the figure, that its capacious breast was bare, as if disdaining to be warded or concealed by any artifice.
In the broad hint which he dropped respecting the daughter of Waldemar Fitzurse, John had more than one motive, each the offspring of a mind, which was a strange mixture of carelessness and presumption with low artifice and cunning.
It was half breath, half music; it rose softly from the waters of the lake; and I was surrounded by it through I knew not what artifice.
He thought more of Bernardo del Carpio because at Roncesvalles he slew Roland in spite of enchantments, availing himself of the artifice of Hercules when he strangled Antaeus the son of Terra in his arms.
An over-scrupulous jealousy of danger to the rights of the people, which is more commonly the fault of the head than of the heart, will be represented as mere pretense and artifice, the stale bait for popularity at the expense of the public good.
To this accidental source of the error may be added the artifice of some celebrated authors, whose writings have had a great share in forming the modern standard of political opinions.
Near the house lay a succession of green meadows, charmingly crossed by several clear rivulets, with here and there a piece of water naturally placed without the least apparent artifice.