artifice

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Related to artifices: quondam, palladium

ar·ti·fice

 (är′tə-fĭs)
n.
1.
a. Deception or trickery: The purchaser believed that the product was new only by artifice of the seller.
b. Something contrived or made up to achieve an end, especially by deceiving; a stratagem or ruse: "From the beginning, 'compassionate conservatism' was an artifice designed to mask Bush's conservatism from an electorate that did not want a sharp rightward turn" (Jonathan Chait). See Synonyms at wile.
2.
a. Cleverness or ingenuity in making or doing something; art or skill: "Literary artifice is the only means that a writer has at his disposal. How else can he convey his impression of life?" (Harry Levin).
b. An artistic device or convention: artifices such as conceits and puns.

[French, from Old French, craftsmanship, from Latin artificium, from artifex, artific-, craftsman : ars, art-, art; see art1 + -fex, maker; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

artifice

(ˈɑːtɪfɪs)
n
1. a clever expedient; ingenious stratagem
2. crafty or subtle deception
3. skill; cleverness
4. a skilfully contrived device
5. obsolete craftsmanship
[C16: from Old French, from Latin artificium skill, from artifex one possessed of a specific skill, from ars skill + -fex, from facere to make]

ar•ti•fice

(ˈɑr tə fɪs)

n.
1. a clever trick or stratagem.
2. trickery; guile; craftiness.
3. cleverness; ingenuity.
4. a skillful or artful contrivance or expedient.
[1525–35; < Anglo-French < Latin artificium craftsmanship, art, craftiness]
syn: See trick.

artifice

1. skill, ingenuity, or craftiness.
2. Obsolete, the command of a learned trade or skill.
See also: Skill and Craft
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.artifice - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)artifice - a deceptive maneuver (especially to avoid capture)
tactical maneuver, tactical manoeuvre, maneuver, manoeuvre - a move made to gain a tactical end

artifice

noun
2. cleverness, skill, facility, invention, ingenuity, finesse, inventiveness, deftness, adroitness a combination of theatrical artifice and dazzling cinematic movement

artifice

noun
1. An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
Translations

artifice

[ˈɑːtɪfɪs] N
1. (= cunning) → habilidad f, ingenio m
2. (= trick) → artificio m, ardid m; (= strategem) → estratagema f

artifice

[ˈɑːrtɪfɪs] nruse f

artifice

n
(= guile)List f no pl
(= stratagem)(Kriegs)list f

artifice

[ˈɑːtɪfɪs] n (frm) (cunning) → abilità, destrezza; (trick) → artificio
References in classic literature ?
Little did she understand the artifices of the selfish and calculating, one of the most familiar of their frauds being to conceal from the skillful their own success, lest it should command a price in proportion to its claims.
Obviously, a humbug, thinking only of winning his little race, would stand a chance of profiting by his artifices.
Volumnia, growing with the flight of time pinker as to the red in her face, and yellower as to the white, reads to Sir Leicester in the long evenings and is driven to various artifices to conceal her yawns, of which the chief and most efficacious is the insertion of the pearl necklace between her rosy lips.
Thus, to take a long and circuitous route, after enticing the enemy out of the way, and though starting after him, to contrive to reach the goal before him, shows knowledge of the artifice of DEVIATION.
Perhaps this was because I had reached the point through my acquaintance with Tolstoy where I was impatient even of the artifice that hid itself.
Yet his style, for the most part devoid alike of artifice and art, almost baldly simple and direct, seems hardly compatible with the disingenuousness of a merely literary intention; one would call it the manner of one more concerned for the fruits of research than for the flowers of expression.
I am, indeed, provoked at the artifice of this unprincipled woman; what stronger proof of her dangerous abilities can be given than this perversion of Reginald's judgment, which when he entered the house was so decidedly against her
Yea, a hellish artifice hath here been devised, a death-horse jingling with the trappings of divine honours!
Such a strain of shallow artifice could not impose even upon Catherine.
It was perhaps lucky for his fortitude that he was ignorant of the artifice of the trapper in leading them around the citadel of Ishmael, and that he had imbibed the soothing impression that every inch of prairie he traversed was just so much added to the distance between his own person and the detested rock.
He thought more of Bernardo del Carpio because at Roncesvalles he slew Roland in spite of enchantments, availing himself of the artifice of Hercules when he strangled Antaeus the son of Terra in his arms.
An over-scrupulous jealousy of danger to the rights of the people, which is more commonly the fault of the head than of the heart, will be represented as mere pretense and artifice, the stale bait for popularity at the expense of the public good.