aryballos


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aryballos

(ˌærɪˈbælɒs)
n
(Ceramics) a small narrow-necked vessel or bottle shaped like a sphere, used in ancient Greece to store oil or perfume
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58) A fifth-century BC Greek aryballos now in Paris depicts a dwarf in a scene of a doctor performing a surgery, while frescoes of pygmies (the dwarf entity) adorn the peristyle of the first century "House of the Physician" in Pompeii.
The aryballos is in the Louvre (CA 2183), while the frescoes are now housed in the Museo Archeologico Nazionale in Naples.
But it is the late Corinthian black figure aryballos, preserved in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (01.
15) 1400 Corinthian spherical aryballos, from Camirus, Rhodes, c.
a member of a small but impressive group of Middle Protocorinthian vase painters stylistically related to the Chigi Painter--perhaps the Chigi Painter himself--created a fine aryballos, said to have been found at Thebes, now in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (Figs.
There is also an aryballos probably of Punic manufacture on display at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto (it is labeled "E.
That thesis seems to me difficult to sustain considering that athleticism is marked in reliefs by the addition of an attribute, particularly an aryballos (266).
The Gorgon's head as a shield emblem is first attested on a Protocorinthian aryballos of 675--50 (my no.
Nine fragments, mending to five, of base and body of an aryballos.
Surely, the Inca must have enjoyed the sound of the splashing water, as well as appreciated the ease of filling their aryballos with this jet of fresh spring water.
Two figurines from Ur, a man of bronze with an aryballos and a female figurine of gold on a pin, both of sixth century date, have been called Babylonian because of their softly modeled style.
For the famous prize aryballos depicting a dancing competition found on Temple Hill, see below, page 413.