as well


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well 1

 (wĕl)
n.
1. A deep hole or shaft sunk into the earth to obtain water, oil, gas, or brine.
2. A container or reservoir for a liquid, such as ink.
3.
a. A place where water issues from the earth; a spring or fountain.
b. A mineral spring.
c. wells A watering place; a spa.
4. An abundant source: a well of information.
5. An open space extending vertically through the floors of a building, as for stairs or ventilation.
6. Nautical
a. An enclosure in a ship's hold for the pumps.
b. A compartment or recessed area in a ship, used for stowage: an anchor well.
c. A part of a ship's weather deck enclosed between two watertight bulkheads.
7. A cistern with a perforated bottom in the hold of a fishing vessel for keeping fish alive.
8. An enclosed space for receiving and holding something, such as the wheels of an airplane when retracted.
9. Chiefly British The central space in a law court, directly in front of the judge's bench, where the counsel or solicitor sits.
v. welled, well·ing, wells
v.intr.
1. To rise to the surface, ready to flow: Tears welled in my eyes.
2. To rise or surge from an inner source: Anger welled up in me.
v.tr.
To pour forth.

[Middle English welle, from Old English; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]

well 2

 (wĕl)
adv. bet·ter (bĕt′ər), best (bĕst)
1. In a good or proper manner: behaved well.
2. Skillfully or proficiently: dances well.
3. Satisfactorily or sufficiently: slept well.
4. Successfully or effectively: gets along well with people.
5. In a comfortable or affluent manner: lived well.
6. In a manner affording benefit or gain; advantageously: married well.
7. With reason or propriety; reasonably: can't very well say no.
8. In all likelihood; indeed: You may well need your umbrella.
9. In a prudent or sensible manner: You would do well to say nothing more.
10. In a close or familiar manner: knew them well.
11. In a favorable or approving manner: spoke well of them.
12. Thoroughly; completely: well cooked; cooked well.
13. Perfectly; clearly: I well understand your intentions.
14. To a suitable or appropriate degree: This product will answer your needs equally well.
15. To a considerable extent or degree: well over the estimate.
16. With care or attention: listened well.
17. Entirely; fully: well worth seeing.
adj. better, best
1. In a satisfactory condition; right or proper: All is well.
2.
a. Not ailing, infirm, or diseased; healthy. See Synonyms at healthy.
b. Cured or healed, as a wound.
c. Of or characterized by the maintenance of good health practices. Often used in combination: a well-baby clinic; a well-child visit to the doctor.
3.
a. Advisable; prudent: It would be well not to ask.
b. Fortunate; good: It is well that you stayed.
interj.
1. Used to introduce a remark, resume a narrative, or fill a pause during conversation.
2. Used to express surprise.
Idioms:
as well
1. In addition; also: mentioned other matters as well.
2. With equal effect: I might as well go.
in well with Informal
In a position to influence or be favored by: He's in well with management.

[Middle English wel, from Old English; see wel- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: English speakers have used well both as an adjective and as an adverb since Old English times. When applied to people, the adjective well usually refers to a state of health. Like similar adjectives, such as ill and faint, well in this use is normally restricted to the predicate, as in He hasn't been well lately. Well does see occasional use before a noun, as in Benjamin Franklin's "Poor Dick eats like a well man, and drinks like a sick." It also appears in compound adjectives like well-baby and well-child, which are widely used by health-care providers. Good, on the other hand, has a much wider range of senses, including "attractive," as in He looks good, and "competent," as in She's pretty good for a beginner, as well as "healthy." See Usage Note at good.

also

tooas well

You use also, too, or as well when you are giving more information about something.

1. 'also'

Also is usually used in front of a verb. If there is no auxiliary verb, you put also immediately in front of the verb, unless the verb is be.

I also began to be interested in cricket.
They also helped out.

If the verb is be, you put also after it.

I was also an American.

If there is an auxiliary verb, you put also after the auxiliary verb.

The symptoms of the illness were also described in the book.

If there is more than one auxiliary verb, you put also after the first one.

We'll also be learning about healthy eating.

Also is sometimes put at the beginning of a clause.

She is very intelligent. Also, she is gorgeous.

Be Careful!
Don't put also at the end of a clause.

2. 'too'

You usually put too at the end of a clause.

Now the problem affects middle-class children, too.
I'll miss you, and Steve will, too.

In conversation, too is used after a word or phrase when you are making a brief comment on something that has just been said.

'His father kicked him out of the house.' – 'Quite right, too.'
'They've finished mending the road.' – 'About time, too!'

Too is sometimes put after the first noun phrase in a clause.

I wondered whether I too would become ill.
, Melissa, too, felt miserable.

However, the position of too can make a difference to the meaning of a sentence. 'I am an American too' can mean either 'Like the person just mentioned, I am an American' or 'Besides having the other qualities just mentioned, I am an American'. However, 'I too am an American' can only mean 'Like the person just mentioned, I am an American'.

Don't put too at the beginning of a sentence.

For more information, see too
3. 'as well'

As well always goes at the end of a clause.

Filter coffee is better for your health than instant coffee. And it tastes nicer as well.
They will have a difficult year next year as well.
4. negatives

You don't usually use 'also', 'too', or 'as well' in negative clauses. Don't say, for example, 'I'm not hungry and she's not hungry too'. You say 'I'm not hungry and she's not hungry either', 'I'm not hungry and neither is she', or 'I'm not hungry and nor is she'.

Edward wasn't at the ceremony, either.
'I don't normally drink coffee in the evening.' – 'Neither do I.'
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.as well - in additionas well - in addition; "he has a Mercedes, too"
Translations
بالإضافَه، أيضا
også
líka, einnig
dahide/da

well2

(wel) comparative better (ˈbetə) : superlative best (best) adjective
1. healthy. I don't feel very / at all well; She doesn't look very well; She's been ill but she's quite well now.
2. in a satisfactory state or condition. All is well now.
adverb
1. in a good, correct, successful, suitable etc way. He's done well to become a millionaire at thirty; She plays the piano well; Mother and baby are both doing well; How well did he do in the exam?
2. with good reason; with justice. You may well look ashamed – that was a cruel thing to do; You can't very well refuse to go.
3. with approval or praise. He speaks well of you.
4. used (with eg damn, ~jolly etc) for emphasis. You can jolly well do it yourself!
5. thoroughly. Examine the car well before you buy it.
6. to a great or considerable extent. He is well over fifty.
interjection
1. used to express surprise etc. Well! I'd never have believed it!
2. used when re-starting a conversation, starting an explanation etc. Do you remember John Watson? Well, he's become a teacher.
well-
1. in a good, satisfactory etc way etc, as in well-behaved.
2. very much, as in well-known.
ˌwell-beˈhaved adjective
behaving correctly. well-behaved children.
ˌwell-ˈbeing noun
welfare. She is always very concerned about her mother's well-being.
ˌwell-ˈbred adjective
(of a person) having good manners.
ˌwell-ˈbuilt adjective
muscular; having a strong, handsome figure.
ˌwell-ˈdone adjective
(of meat) cooked until there is no blood in it; (of food) cooked for a long time.
ˌwell-ˈearned adjective
thoroughly deserved. a well-earned rest.
ˌwell-ˈeducated adjective
educated to a good standard.
ˌwell-ˈfed adjective
correctly and sufficiently fed.
ˌwell-ˈgroomed adjective
of smart, tidy appearance.
ˌwell-inˈformed adjective
having or showing a thorough knowledge. a well-informed person/essay.
ˌwell-ˈknown adjective
familiar or famous. a well-known TV personality.
ˌwell-ˈmade adjective
a well-made table.
ˌwell-ˈmannered adjective
polite.
ˌwell-ˈoff adjective
1. rich. He is very well-off; a well-off young lady.
2. fortunate. You do not know when you are well off.
ˌwell-ˈread (-ˈred) adjective
having read many books etc; intelligent.
ˌwell-ˈspoken adjective
(of a person) speaking with a pleasing voice, in a grammatically correct way etc.
ˌwell-to-ˈdo adjective
having enough money to live comfortably.
ˌwell-wisher noun
a person who wishes one success etc.
as well
in addition; too. If you will go, I'll go as well.
as well as
in addition to. She works in a restaurant in the evenings as well as doing a full-time job during the day.
be just as well
to be fortunate; to be no cause for regret. It's just as well (that) you didn't go – the meeting was cancelled.
be as well to
to be advisable or sensible. It would be as well to go by train – the roads are flooded.
very well
fine, okay. Have you finished? Very well, you may go now.
well done!
used in congratulating a person. I hear you won the competition. Well done!
well enough
fairly, but not particularly, well.
well up in
knowing a great deal about. He's very well up in financial matters.
References in classic literature ?
You think that justice may be of use in peace as well as in war?
Well, I can; and I don't see why I should n't enjoy myself as well as Trix.
Alice thought it would never do to have an argument at the very beginning of their conversation, so she smiled and said, 'If your Majesty will only tell me the right way to begin, I'll do it as well as I can.
said the cook, who loved good fare as well as a good fight; and they both laid by their swords and fell to the food with hearty will.
I think you had better, for if I have got to keep accounts I may as well begin in the right way.
A born provincial man who has a grain of public spirit as well as a few ideas, should do what he can to resist the rush of everything that is a little better than common towards London.
Catherine perceived, as well as I did, that he held it rather a punishment, than a gratification, to endure our company; and she made no scruple of proposing, presently, to depart.
He was alone; and his appearance, as well as the heavens and the earth, united to encourage the sanguine expectation of the pure heart that throbbed so ardently when its owner witnessed any favourable change in the countenance of the young man.