asbestos


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as·bes·tos

 (ăs-bĕs′təs, ăz-)
n.
1. Any of six incombustible chemical-resistant silicate minerals, including one serpentine (chrysotile) and five amphiboles (amosite, crocidolite, and fibrous forms of actinolite, anthophyllite, and tremolite), that separate easily into long, thin, flexible fibers and that have been widely used commercially in products such as fireproofing, electrical insulation, building materials, brake linings, and chemical filters. Mining and use of asbestos has been restricted because inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause asbestosis and cancer.
2. Fabric or material containing any of these mineral forms.
adj.
Of, made of, or containing one of these six mineral forms.

[Middle English asbestus, a kind of mineral which could not be extinguished when it caught fire, perhaps also asbestos (whose fibers may have been made into wicks that would never be consumed when used in ever-burning oil lamps), from Medieval Latin, from Latin asbestos, a kind of mineral (exact meaning uncertain), from Greek, quicklime, from asbestos (tintanos), unquenchable (lime), from asbestos, unquenchable (quicklime being so called because it reacts vigorously with water to release heat that can ignite combustible substances) : a-, not; see a-1 + sbennunai, sbes-, to quench.]

as·bes′tine (-tĭn), as·bes′tic (-tĭk) adj.

asbestos

(æsˈbɛstɒs; -təs) or

asbestus

n
(Minerals)
a. any of the fibrous amphibole and serpentine minerals, esp chrysotile and tremolite, that are incombustible and resistant to chemicals. It was formerly widely used in the form of fabric or board as a heat-resistant structural material
b. (as modifier): asbestos matting.
[C14 (originally applied to a mythical stone the heat of which could not be extinguished): via Latin from Greek: from asbestos inextinguishable, from a-1 + sbennunai to extinguish]
asˈbestine adj

as•bes•tos

(æsˈbɛs təs, æz-)

n.
1. a fibrous mineral, either amphibole or chrysotile, formerly used for making incombustible or fireproof articles and in building insulation.
2. a fabric woven from asbestos fibers, formerly used for theater curtains, firefighters' gloves, etc.
Sometimes, as•bes′tus.
[1350–1400; Middle English asbeston, albeston < Middle French < Latin asbestos < Greek: literally, unquenchable]
as•bes′tous, adj.

as·bes·tos

(ăs-bĕs′təs)
Any of several fibrous mineral forms of magnesium silicate. Asbestos is resistant to heat, flames, and chemical action. Some forms have been shown to cause lung diseases. For this reason, asbestos is no longer used to make insulation, fireproofing material, and brake linings.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asbestos - a fibrous amphiboleasbestos - a fibrous amphibole; used for making fireproof articles; inhaling fibers can cause asbestosis or lung cancer
amphibole - a mineral or mineral variety belonging to the amphibole group
amphibole group - a group of minerals with similar crystal structures containing a silicate chain and combinations of chiefly sodium and calcium and magnesium and iron and aluminum
chrysotile - a grey or green fibrous mineral; an important source of commercial asbestos
tremolite - a white or pale green mineral (calcium magnesium silicate) of the amphibole group used as a form of asbestos
Translations
حَرير صَخْري، أسْبيسْتوس
azbestazbestový
asbest
asbest
asbesti
azbestazbestni
azbeszt
asbest
asbestas
azbests
asbestasbest-
azbestazbestowy
azbestazbestový
azbestазбест
asbest
amyantasbest

asbestos

[æzˈbestəs] Namianto m, asbesto m

asbestos

[æsˈbɛstɒs] namiante m, asbeste m

asbestos

nAsbest m

asbestos

[æsˈbɛstɒs] namianto, asbesto

asbestos

(ӕzˈbestos) noun, adjective
(of) a mineral that will not burn which can protect against fire. an asbestos suit.

as·bes·tos

n. asbesto, amianto.

asbestos

n asbesto, amianto
References in classic literature ?
 On a slab of thin asbestos what I venture here to quote --
A sinister collection, indeed, and one which, Agravaine felt, should have been capable of handling without his assistance any dragon that ever came into the world to stimulate the asbestos industry.
But as for Jason himself (thanks to Medea's enchanted ointment), the white flame curled around his body, without injuring him a jot more than if he had been made of asbestos.
Similarly, neither removal nor encapsulation "restores" any property to a prior condition; the property would not have been originally constructed with asbestos if the health hazards had always been known.
However The National Asbestos Helpline believes that the number is significantly higher and research has found a clear connection between high levels of asbestos dust exposure and the risk of lung cancer.
LOS ANGELES -- The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO), which combines education, advocacy and community as the leading U.
We supported federal legislation to ban asbestos that passed the Senate unanimously in the last Congress.
The ramifications of the new legislation and a full description of the legal framework surrounding asbestos in buildings will be explained at a major seminar in the North of England this autumn.
Asbestos has been identified in a variety of places within our school buildings, including roofs, ceilings, walls and partitions, floor coverings, doors, fixtures and fittings and boiler houses.
Speaking at a community lecture organised by the Emirates Environment Group, Charles Faulkner, a principal consultant at WSP Environment and Energy, working on asbestos risk management, called for a total ban on life-threatening asbestos containing materials (ACB).
Monmouth AM Nick Ramsay, who co-hosted a conference on asbestos at the National Assembly earlier this year, said: "Asbestos is a hidden killer and we must eliminate it from our schools.
Asbestos management plan being rolled out in addition to surveys, logs and training already received.