asbestos


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to asbestos: asbestos removal, asbestos insulation

as·bes·tos

 (ăs-bĕs′təs, ăz-)
n.
Any of six incombustible, chemical-resistant, fibrous minerals of impure magnesium silicate, occurring in either serpentine or amphibole form and used historically in many products, including fireproofing, electrical insulation, building materials, brake linings, and chemical filters. Owing to health hazards, notably from inhalation, use of asbestos has been restricted.
adj.
Of, made of, or containing one of these six mineral forms.

[Middle English asbestus, from Latin asbestos, mineral or gem, from Greek, mineral or gem, unslaked lime, from asbestos, unquenchable : a-, not; see a-1 + sbennunai, sbes-, to quench.]

as·bes′tine (-tĭn), as·bes′tic (-tĭk) adj.

asbestos

(æsˈbɛstɒs; -təs) or

asbestus

n
(Minerals)
a. any of the fibrous amphibole and serpentine minerals, esp chrysotile and tremolite, that are incombustible and resistant to chemicals. It was formerly widely used in the form of fabric or board as a heat-resistant structural material
b. (as modifier): asbestos matting.
[C14 (originally applied to a mythical stone the heat of which could not be extinguished): via Latin from Greek: from asbestos inextinguishable, from a-1 + sbennunai to extinguish]
asˈbestine adj

as•bes•tos

(æsˈbɛs təs, æz-)

n.
1. a fibrous mineral, either amphibole or chrysotile, formerly used for making incombustible or fireproof articles and in building insulation.
2. a fabric woven from asbestos fibers, formerly used for theater curtains, firefighters' gloves, etc.
Sometimes, as•bes′tus.
[1350–1400; Middle English asbeston, albeston < Middle French < Latin asbestos < Greek: literally, unquenchable]
as•bes′tous, adj.

as·bes·tos

(ăs-bĕs′təs)
Any of several fibrous mineral forms of magnesium silicate. Asbestos is resistant to heat, flames, and chemical action. Some forms have been shown to cause lung diseases. For this reason, asbestos is no longer used to make insulation, fireproofing material, and brake linings.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asbestos - a fibrous amphiboleasbestos - a fibrous amphibole; used for making fireproof articles; inhaling fibers can cause asbestosis or lung cancer
amphibole - a mineral or mineral variety belonging to the amphibole group
amphibole group - a group of minerals with similar crystal structures containing a silicate chain and combinations of chiefly sodium and calcium and magnesium and iron and aluminum
chrysotile - a grey or green fibrous mineral; an important source of commercial asbestos
tremolite - a white or pale green mineral (calcium magnesium silicate) of the amphibole group used as a form of asbestos
Translations
حَرير صَخْري، أسْبيسْتوس
azbestazbestový
asbest
asbest
asbesti
azbestazbestni
azbeszt
asbest
asbestas
azbests
asbestasbest-
azbestazbestowy
azbestazbestový
azbestазбест
asbest
amyantasbest

asbestos

[æzˈbestəs] Namianto m, asbesto m

asbestos

[æsˈbɛstɒs] namiante m, asbeste m

asbestos

nAsbest m

asbestos

[æsˈbɛstɒs] namianto, asbesto

asbestos

(ӕzˈbestos) noun, adjective
(of) a mineral that will not burn which can protect against fire. an asbestos suit.

as·bes·tos

n. asbesto, amianto.

asbestos

n asbesto, amianto
References in classic literature ?
But as for Jason himself (thanks to Medea's enchanted ointment), the white flame curled around his body, without injuring him a jot more than if he had been made of asbestos.
A sinister collection, indeed, and one which, Agravaine felt, should have been capable of handling without his assistance any dragon that ever came into the world to stimulate the asbestos industry.
 On a slab of thin asbestos what I venture here to quote --
12, 2013 /PRNewswire-iReach/ -- It is known that asbestos is dangerous and may lead to health problems including mesothelioma .
Monmouth AM Nick Ramsay, who co-hosted a conference on asbestos at the National Assembly earlier this year, said: "Asbestos is a hidden killer and we must eliminate it from our schools.
Asbestos management plan being rolled out in addition to surveys, logs and training already received.
The history of asbestos dates back to ancient Greece and beyond, as accounts of its use ranged from the wicks of lanterns to tablecloths and funeral garments.
The study by the British Lung Foundation said there was alarming ignorance among workers such as builders, plasterers, plumbers, electricians and gas fitters about the dangers of asbestos.
Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral found all over the world.
But that vermiculite was contaminated with asbestos also found in the ground there.
Bogus doesn't tell you that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration first established and began to enforce strict limits on asbestos exposure in the workplace in 1971.