ascend

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as·cend

 (ə-sĕnd′)
v. as·cend·ed, as·cend·ing, as·cends
v.intr.
1. To go or move upward; rise: The balloon ascended into the clouds. See Synonyms at rise.
2. To slope upward: The trail ascends to an outcrop overlooking the valley.
3. To rise from a lower level or station; advance: ascended from poverty to great wealth; ascend to the throne.
4. To go back in time or upward in genealogical succession.
v.tr.
1. To move upward upon or along; climb: ascended the mountain.
2. To slope upward toward or along: The road ascends the ridge.
3. To succeed to; occupy: ascended the throne upon the death of her father.

[Middle English ascenden, from Old French ascendre, from Latin ascendere : ad-, ad- + scandere, to climb; see skand- in Indo-European roots.]

as·cend′a·ble, as·cend′i·ble adj.

ascend

(əˈsɛnd)
vb
1. to go or move up (a ladder, hill, slope, etc); mount; climb
2. (intr) to slope or incline upwards
3. (intr) to rise to a higher point, level, degree, etc
4. to follow (a river) upstream towards its source
5. to trace (a genealogy, etc) back in time
6. (Music, other) to sing or play (a scale, arpeggio, etc) from the lower to higher notes
7. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) ascend the throne to become king or queen
[C14: from Latin ascendere, from scandere]

as•cend

(əˈsɛnd)

v.i.
1. to move, climb, or go upward; mount; rise.
2. to slant upward.
3. to rise to a higher point, rank, degree, etc.
4. to go toward the source or beginning.
v.t.
5. to go or move upward upon or along; climb; mount.
6. to gain or succeed to: to ascend the throne.
[1350–1400; < Anglo-French ascendre < Latin ascendere <a- a-5scandere to climb; see scan]
as•cend′a•ble, as•cend′i•ble, adj.

ascend

- A planet ascends when it moves toward the zenith or comes above the horizon.
See also related terms for moves.

ascend


Past participle: ascended
Gerund: ascending

Imperative
ascend
ascend
Present
I ascend
you ascend
he/she/it ascends
we ascend
you ascend
they ascend
Preterite
I ascended
you ascended
he/she/it ascended
we ascended
you ascended
they ascended
Present Continuous
I am ascending
you are ascending
he/she/it is ascending
we are ascending
you are ascending
they are ascending
Present Perfect
I have ascended
you have ascended
he/she/it has ascended
we have ascended
you have ascended
they have ascended
Past Continuous
I was ascending
you were ascending
he/she/it was ascending
we were ascending
you were ascending
they were ascending
Past Perfect
I had ascended
you had ascended
he/she/it had ascended
we had ascended
you had ascended
they had ascended
Future
I will ascend
you will ascend
he/she/it will ascend
we will ascend
you will ascend
they will ascend
Future Perfect
I will have ascended
you will have ascended
he/she/it will have ascended
we will have ascended
you will have ascended
they will have ascended
Future Continuous
I will be ascending
you will be ascending
he/she/it will be ascending
we will be ascending
you will be ascending
they will be ascending
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been ascending
you have been ascending
he/she/it has been ascending
we have been ascending
you have been ascending
they have been ascending
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been ascending
you will have been ascending
he/she/it will have been ascending
we will have been ascending
you will have been ascending
they will have been ascending
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been ascending
you had been ascending
he/she/it had been ascending
we had been ascending
you had been ascending
they had been ascending
Conditional
I would ascend
you would ascend
he/she/it would ascend
we would ascend
you would ascend
they would ascend
Past Conditional
I would have ascended
you would have ascended
he/she/it would have ascended
we would have ascended
you would have ascended
they would have ascended
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.ascend - travel up, "We ascended the mountain"ascend - travel up, "We ascended the mountain"; "go up a ladder"; "The mountaineers slowly ascended the steep slope"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
rise up, surface, come up, rise - come to the surface
uprise - ascend as a sound; "The choirs singing uprose and filled the church"
come down, descend, go down, fall - move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"
2.ascend - go back in order of genealogical successionascend - go back in order of genealogical succession; "Inheritance may not ascend linearly"
date back, date from, go back - belong to an earlier time; "This story dates back 200 years"
3.ascend - become king or queenascend - become king or queen; "She ascended to the throne after the King's death"
accede, enter - take on duties or office; "accede to the throne"
4.ascend - appear to be moving upward, as by means of tendrils; "the vine climbed up the side of the house"
5.ascend - go along towards (a river's) sourceascend - go along towards (a river's) source; "The boat ascended the Delaware"
travel along, follow - travel along a certain course; "follow the road"; "follow the trail"
6.ascend - slope upwardsascend - slope upwards; "The path ascended to the top of the hill"
slope, incline, pitch - be at an angle; "The terrain sloped down"
7.ascend - come up, of celestial bodiesascend - come up, of celestial bodies; "The sun also rises"; "The sun uprising sees the dusk night fled..."; "Jupiter ascends"
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
go up, rise, move up, lift, arise, come up, uprise - move upward; "The fog lifted"; "The smoke arose from the forest fire"; "The mist uprose from the meadows"
8.ascend - move to a better position in life or to a better job; "She ascended from a life of poverty to one of great
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"

ascend

verb
1. climb, scale, mount, go up I held her hand as we ascended the steps.
climb go down, descend
2. slope upwards, come up, rise up A number of steps ascend from the cobbled street.
slope upwards go down, slope downwards, descend, incline, slant
3. move up, rise, go up Keep the drill centred as it ascends and descends in the hole.
move up fall, drop, sink, go down, dip, descend, move down
4. float up, rise, climb, tower, go up, take off, soar, lift off, fly up They ascended 55,900 feet in their balloon.
float up fall, drop, sink, go down, plunge, dip, tumble, descend, plummet, alight, subside, move down

ascend

verb
1. To move from a lower to a higher position:
2. To move upward on or along:
3. To attain a higher status, rank, or condition:
Idiom: go up the ladder.
Translations
يَصْعَد، يَتَسَلَّق
stoupat
bestigegå opad
kohotanousta
felemelkedikfelmegyfelszáll
rísa, stíga upp
įžengti į sostąkilķmaskopimaskoptišlaitas
kāptuzlēkt

ascend

[əˈsend]
A. VT (frm) [+ stairs] → subir; [+ mountain] → subir a; [+ throne] → ascender a, subir a
B. VI (= rise) → subir, ascender; (= slope up) → elevarse

ascend

[əˈsɛnd]
vt
(= go up) [+ stairs, steps] → gravir
to ascend the throne → accéder au trône
vi
(= go upwards) → monter
to ascend to sth → accéder à qch

ascend

vi (= rise)aufsteigen; (Christ)auffahren; (= slope upwards)ansteigen (→ to auf +acc); in ascending orderin aufsteigender Reihenfolge
vt stairshinaufsteigen; mountain, heights of knowledgeerklimmen (geh); thronebesteigen; to ascend the scale (Mus) → die Tonleiter aufwärts singen

ascend

[əˈsɛnd]
1. vt (frm) (stairs) → salire; (mountain) → scalare; (throne) → salire a, ascendere a
2. visalire

ascend

(əˈsend) verb
to climb, go, or rise up. The smoke ascended into the air.
aˈscendancy/aˈscendency noun
control or power (over). They have the ascendancy over the other political groups.
aˈscent (-t) noun
1. the act of climbing or going up. The ascent of Mount Everest.
2. a slope upwards. a steep ascent.
ascend the throne
to be crowned king or queen.

ascend

vi. ascender, subir, escalar.
References in periodicals archive ?
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COMMONWEALTH leaders are set to agree historic changes to the 300-year-old laws of royal succession to enable a first-born daughter to ascend the throne ahead of her brothers, a Government minister said.
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The poll of almost 2000 adults found that 59 per cent of people favour dispensing with tradition to see William, rather than his dad Prince Charles, ascend the throne.
WHEN Solomon was about to ascend the throne to succeed his father, David, he asked God for a "listening heart" in order to govern well.