asceticism


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as·cet·i·cism

 (ə-sĕt′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The principles and practices of an ascetic; extreme self-denial and austerity.
2. The doctrine that the ascetic life releases the soul from bondage to the body and permits union with the divine.

asceticism

(əˈsɛtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the behaviour, discipline, or outlook of an ascetic, esp of a religious ascetic
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the principles of ascetic practices, esp in the early Christian Church
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the theory and system of ascetic practices

asceticism

a severe self-deprivation for ethical, religious, or intellectual ends. — ascetic, n., adj.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual stateasceticism - the doctrine that through renunciation of worldly pleasures it is possible to achieve a high spiritual or intellectual state
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)asceticism - the trait of great self-denial (especially refraining from worldly pleasures)
self-denial, self-discipline - the trait of practicing self discipline
monasticism - asceticism as a form of religious life; usually conducted in a community under a common rule and characterized by celibacy and poverty and obedience
3.asceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraintasceticism - rigorous self-denial and active self-restraint
self-control, self-denial, self-discipline - the act of denying yourself; controlling your impulses

asceticism

Translations
زُهـد، تَنَسُّك
askeze
askese
aszkétaság
meinlætalifnaîur
asketizmus
çileciliksofuluk

asceticism

[əˈsetɪsɪzəm] Nascetismo m

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzəm] nascétisme m

asceticism

nAskese f; a life of asceticismein Leben in Askese

asceticism

[əˈsɛtɪsɪzm] nascetismo

ascetic

(əˈsetik) adjective
avoiding pleasure and comfort, especially for religious reasons. Monks lead ascetic lives.
noun
an ascetic person.
aˈscetically adverb
aˈsceticism (-sizəm) noun
References in classic literature ?
Of the asceticism that deadens the senses, as of the vulgar profligacy that dulls them, it was to know nothing.
But do not think that by praising these I am disparaging the others; all I mean to say is that the penances of those of the present day do not come up to the asceticism and austerity of former times; but it does not follow from this that they are not all worthy; at least I think them so; and at the worst the hypocrite who pretends to be good does less harm than the open sinner.
Nothing is easier than to give Christian asceticism a Socialist tinge.
His head, full of graceful majesty, was covered with the episcopal mitre, a headdress which gave it, in addition to the character of sovereignty, that of asceticism and evangelic meditation.
It is not supposable that he intended a satire upon Babcock's own asceticism, for this would have been a truly cynical stroke.
Well educated, well endowed, and not deficient physically, he remained in the grip of a certain devil whom the modern world knows as self-consciousness, and whom the medieval, with dimmer vision, worshipped as asceticism.
But there is in my nature a strain of asceticism, and I have subjected my flesh each week to a more severe mortification.
poor knight' that spirit reached the utmost limit of asceticism.
The old effect of asceticism, bred of terrific hardships and toil, had vanished; the features had become broader and heavier, betraying all the stigmata of the life he lived, advertising the man's self-indulgence, harshness, and brutality.
With lips compressed and clouded brow, he strode up and down the oaken floor, the very genius and impersonation of asceticism, while the great bell still thundered and clanged above his head.
The terror of cloudless noon, the emerald of Polycrates, the awe of prosperity, the instinct which leads every generous soul to impose on itself tasks of a noble asceticism and vicarious virtue, are the tremblings of the balance of justice through the heart and mind of man.
Outwardly he was cheerful, reliable, and brave; but within, all had reverted to chaos, ruled, so far as it was ruled at all, by an incomplete asceticism.