ascorbic acid


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Related to ascorbic acid: citric acid

a·scor·bic acid

 (ə-skôr′bĭk)
n.
A water-soluble vitamin, C6H8O6, found in fruits, potatoes, peppers, and leafy green vegetables or produced synthetically. A deficiency of ascorbic acid causes scurvy. Also called vitamin C.

ascorbic acid

(əˈskɔːbɪk)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a white crystalline vitamin present in plants, esp citrus fruits, tomatoes, and green vegetables. A deficiency in the diet of man leads to scurvy. Formula: C6H8O6. Also called: vitamin C
[C20 ascorbic from a-1 + scorb(ut)ic]

a•scor′bic ac′id

(əˈskɔr bɪk)
n.
a white, crystalline, water-soluble vitamin, C6H8O6, occurring naturally in citrus fruits, green vegetables, etc., and also produced synthetically, essential for normal metabolism: used in the prevention and treatment of scurvy, and in wound-healing and tissue repair. Also called vitamin C.
[1930–35; a-6 + scorb(ut)ic]

a·scor·bic acid

(ə-skôr′bĭk)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ascorbic acid - a vitamin found in fresh fruits (especially citrus fruits) and vegetablesascorbic acid - a vitamin found in fresh fruits (especially citrus fruits) and vegetables; prevents scurvy
antioxidant - substance that inhibits oxidation or inhibits reactions promoted by oxygen or peroxides
water-soluble vitamin - any vitamin that is soluble in water
Translations
askorbinsyre
askorbiinhape
askorbiinihappo
askorbinsyra

ascorbic acid

ascorbic acid

[əˌskɔːbɪkˈæsɪd] nacido ascorbico

a·scor·bic ac·id

n. ácido ascórbico, vitamina C.

ascorbic acid

n ácido ascórbico
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the biochemistry, mechanism of action, and physiologic activity of ascorbic acid have been extensively reported in the literature, as detailed in book compilations by Thomas Levy, MD, the medical profession has largely ignored ascorbic acid's role in the treatment of patients experiencing severe infection and sepsis in the hospital setting.
Interestingly enough, a study found that Vitamin C in a synthetic ascorbic acid form is slightly superior to the Vitamin C content in natural orange juice, based on blood levels of ascorbic acid, and not different based on ascorbic acid in leukocytes (white blood cells).
After hot-break processing at 93 C, only 37% of ascorbic acid and 42% of vitamin C remained in the paste from the original levels found in fresh tomatoes, and levels of quercetin were reduced by 55% dry weight.
Analysis of variance (Table 2) showed that foliar application of ascorbic acid, nicotinic acid and turmeric rhizome extract had significant effect on total polyphenols, total flavonoids, total carotenoids and antioxidant activity.
It is formulated with 24 Karat Gold as well as ingredients such as Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), and Green Tea.
The values were expressed as the mg ascorbic acid equivalents (AAE)/g of fruit pulp.
After much heated debate and consultation the hospital staff eventually agreed to the family's request and began to administer the intravenous ascorbic acid to Mr Smith, at 100g per day.
The human species, however, lost its ability to produce ascorbic acid sometime in its early development.
Table 3 depicts the superoxide dismutase, ascorbic acid and tocopherol contents of seeds of vigna mungo plants in control.
Cold and ascorbic acid "I took high doses of ascorbic acid and still got ill .