ashore


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a·shore

 (ə-shôr′)
adv.
1. To or onto the shore: driven ashore by the wind.
2. On land: spent the day ashore.

ashore

(əˈʃɔː)
adv
(Physical Geography) towards or onto land from the water: we swam ashore.
adj, adv (postpositive)
(Physical Geography) on land, having come from the water: a day ashore before sailing.

a•shore

(əˈʃɔr, əˈʃoʊr)

adv.
1. to or onto the shore.
2. on land rather than at sea or on the water.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.ashore - towards the shore from the waterashore - towards the shore from the water; "we invited them ashore"

ashore

adverb on land, on the beach, on the shore, aground, to the shore, on dry land, shorewards, landwards Once ashore, the vessel was thoroughly inspected.
Translations
عَلى أو إلى الشاطئ
na břehna břehu
fra bordei land
a/en tierra firme
partonpartra
í land , aî landi
ant krantoį krantą
izkāpt krastākrastākrasta virzienā
na obali
kıyıdakıyıya

ashore

[əˈʃɔːʳ] ADVen tierra
to be ashoreestar en tierra
to go/come ashoredesembarcar
to put sb ashoredesembarcar a algn, poner a algn en tierra
to run ashoreencallar

ashore

[əˈʃɔːr] advà terre
Once ashore, the vessel was inspected → Une fois qu'il eut touché terre, le vaisseau a été inspecté.
to go ashore [person] → aller à terre, débarquer; [vessel] → toucher terre
to come ashore [oil, debris] → aborder, toucher terre
Oil has come ashore east of Plymouth → Un cargo pétrolier a abordé à l'est de Plymouth., Un cargo pétrolier a touché terre à l'est de Plymouth.

ashore

advan Land; to run ashorestranden, auf den Strand auflaufen; to put ashorean Land gehen

ashore

[əˈʃɔːʳ] adva terra
to go ashore → scendere a terra, sbarcare

ashore

(əˈʃoː) adverb
on or on to the shore. The sailor went ashore.
References in classic literature ?
Staring up into the green gloom of the horse-chestnut trees above him, he dreamed dreams of all sorts, and was just imagining himself tossing on the ocean in a voyage round the world, when the sound of voices brought him ashore in a flash.
Accordingly he jumped ashore from one of the canoes, and made his way to our camp.
When the triplets were taken ashore at New York, he had, as he said, `to carry some of them.
Sagaciously under their spectacles, did they peep into the holds of vessels Mighty was their fuss about little matters, and marvellous, sometimes, the obtuseness that allowed greater ones to slip between their fingers Whenever such a mischance occurred -- when a waggon-load of valuable merchandise had been smuggled ashore, at noonday, perhaps, and directly beneath their unsuspicious noses -- nothing could exceed the vigilance and alacrity with which they proceeded to lock, and double-lock, and secure with tape and sealing -- wax, all the avenues of the delinquent vessel.
Nor was there any earthly reason why I as a sailor should sleep two in a bed, more than anybody else; for sailors no more sleep two in a bed at sea, than bachelor Kings do ashore.
I have had controversies about it with experienced whalemen afloat, and learned naturalists ashore.
A general bustle of expectation and preparation was spread through the boat; in the cabin, one and another were gathering their things together, and arranging them, preparatory to going ashore.
Of course, I was indignant, and swore I had just come ashore from a long voyage, and all that sort of thing -- just to see, you know, if it would deceive that slave.
The people often stepped aboard the raft, as we glided along the grassy shores, and gossiped with us and with the crew for a hundred yards or so, then stepped ashore again, refreshed by the ride.
So we unhitched a skiff and pulled down the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore.
At the end of a long twelve or fifteen minutes the wheels stopped, and Tom slipped overboard and swam ashore in the dusk, landing fifty yards down- stream, out of danger of possible stragglers.
If I was to slip ashore without anybody seeing me, they would know it inside of an hour.