asperity


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as·per·i·ty

 (ă-spĕr′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. as·per·i·ties
1.
a. Roughness or harshness, as of surface, sound, or climate: the asperity of northern winters.
b. Severity; rigor.
2. A slight projection from a surface; a point or bump.
3. Harshness of manner; ill temper or irritability.

[Middle English asperite, from Old French asprete, from Latin asperitās, from asper, rough.]

asperity

(æˈspɛrɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. roughness or sharpness of temper
2. roughness or harshness of a surface, sound, taste, etc
3. a condition hard to endure; affliction
4. (General Physics) physics the elastically compressed region of contact between two surfaces caused by the normal force
[C16: from Latin asperitās, from asper rough]

as•per•i•ty

(əˈspɛr ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. harshness or sharpness of tone, temper, or manner; severity; acrimony.
2. hardship; difficulty; rigor.
3. roughness of surface; unevenness.
4. something rough or harsh.
[1200–50; < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin asperitās <asper rough]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.asperity - something hard to endureasperity - something hard to endure; "the asperity of northern winters"
difficultness, difficulty - the quality of being difficult; "they agreed about the difficulty of the climb"
sternness - the quality (as of scenery) being grim and gloomy and forbidding; "the sternness of his surroundings made him uncomfortable"
2.asperity - harshness of mannerasperity - harshness of manner      
ill nature - a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition

asperity

asperity

noun
Something that obstructs progress and requires great effort to overcome:
difficulty, hardship, rigor, vicissitude (often used in plural).
Idioms: a hard nut to crack, a hard row to hoe, heavy sledding.
Translations

asperity

[æsˈperɪtɪ] Naspereza f

asperity

[æˈspɛrɪti] (formal) n (= sharpness) with asperity → sèchement

asperity

nSchroffheit f no pl, → Schärfe f no pl; the asperities of the winter (liter)der raue Winter (geh)

asperity

[æˈspɛrɪtɪ] n (frm) (of manners, voice) → asprezza
References in classic literature ?
Thus by a judicious exercise of tact and asperity we re-established the atmospheric equilibrium of the room long before I left them a little before midnight, now tenderly reconciled, to walk down to the harbour and hail the Tremolino by the usual soft whistle from the edge of the quay.
While I acknowledge the success of the present work to have been greater than I anticipated, and the praises it has elicited from a few kind critics to have been greater than it deserved, I must also admit that from some other quarters it has been censured with an asperity which I was as little prepared to expect, and which my judgment, as well as my feelings, assures me is more bitter than just.
He certainly was to blame occasionally for the asperity of his manners, and the arbitrary nature of his measures, yet much that is exceptionable in this part of his conduct may be traced to rigid notions of duty acquired in that tyrannical school, a ship of war, and to the construction given by his companions to the orders of Mr.
I am hoping to hear," the latter concluded, with some slight asperity in his manner, "that the circumstance to which I have alluded was accidental and will not be repeated.
I hesitate not to submit it to the decision of any candid and honest adversary of the proposed government, whether language can furnish epithets of too much asperity, for so shameless and so prostitute an attempt to impose on the citizens of America.
Bennet, who assured him with some asperity that they were very well able to keep a good cook, and that her daughters had nothing to do in the kitchen.
I have only accepted the mission near the king of France, monsieur le cardinal," retorted the comte, though with less asperity, for he thought he had sufficiently the advantage to show himself moderate.
answered her mother, with an asperity that she had never permitted to herself before.
Ford has already explained the situation," he said with asperity.
Being informed (with considerable asperity of tone and manner) that this answer failed to account for the interest which appeared to have been inspired in him by a total stranger, Mr.
Tom relished this tune less than any that he preceded it, for it began to wake up a sort of echo in his conscience; so he interrupted and said with decision, though without asperity, that he was not in a situation to help her, and wasn't going to do it.
Bear in mind, and let it not escape thy memory, how she receives thee; if she changes colour while thou art giving her my message; if she is agitated and disturbed at hearing my name; if she cannot rest upon her cushion, shouldst thou haply find her seated in the sumptuous state chamber proper to her rank; and should she be standing, observe if she poises herself now on one foot, now on the other; if she repeats two or three times the reply she gives thee; if she passes from gentleness to austerity, from asperity to tenderness; if she raises her hand to smooth her hair though it be not disarranged.