aspersion


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Related to aspersion: cast aspersions

as·per·sion

 (ə-spûr′zhən, -shən)
n.
1.
a. A false or damaging accusation or insinuation: Don't cast aspersions on my honesty.
b. The act of slandering or libeling; defaming.
2. A sprinkling, especially with holy water.

aspersion

(əˈspɜːʃən)
n
1. a disparaging or malicious remark; slanderous accusation (esp in the phrase cast aspersions (on))
2. the act of defaming
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) rare the act of sprinkling, esp of water in baptism

as•per•sion

(əˈspɜr ʒən, -ʃən)

n.
1. a damaging or derogatory remark: casting aspersions on a rival.
2. the act of slandering; defamation; calumniation.
3. the act of sprinkling with water, as in baptism.
[1545–55; (< Middle French) < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aspersion - a disparaging remark; "in the 19th century any reference to female sexuality was considered a vile aspersion"; "it is difficult for a woman to understand a man's sensitivity to any slur on his virility"
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
ethnic slur - a slur on someone's race or language
2.aspersion - an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
attack - strong criticism; "he published an unexpected attack on my work"
3.aspersion - the act of sprinkling water in baptism (rare)aspersion - the act of sprinkling water in baptism (rare)
baptism - a Christian sacrament signifying spiritual cleansing and rebirth; "most churches baptize infants but some insist on adult baptism"

aspersion

aspersion

noun
The expression of injurious, malicious statements about someone:
Law: libel.
Translations
baktalelsebakvaskelsebestenkning

aspersion

[əsˈpɜːʃən] Ncalumnia f
to cast aspersions on sbdifamar or calumniar a algn

aspersion

n to cast aspersions on somebody/somethingabfällige Bemerkungen über jdn/etw machen; without wishing to cast any aspersionsohne mich abfällig äußern zu wollen

aspersion

[əsˈpɜːʃn] n (frm) → calunnia, maldicenza
to cast aspersions on sth/sb (often hum) → diffamare qc/qn
References in classic literature ?
Elsewhere in this volume the slanderous aspersion has been disproved, that the vocation of whaling is throughout a slatternly, untidy business.
It's not at all from friendship," declared Nicholas, flaring up and turning away as if from a shameful aspersion.
Playmore puts it) to the unborn children of your marriage, to suppress a document which vindicates the memory of their father from the aspersion that the Scotch Verdict might otherwise cast on it.
He did not like that text; it seemed to cast an aspersion on himself.
He affected to be jealous:--he may, for aught I know, be inclined enough to jealousy in his natural temper; nay, he must have had it from nature, or the devil must have put it into his head; for I defy all the world to cast a just aspersion on my character: nay, the most scandalous tongues have never dared censure my reputation.
With such pacific and bantering remarks did Mr Brass refute the foul aspersion on his character; but the virtuous Sarah, moved by stronger feelings, and having at heart, perhaps, a more jealous regard for the honour of her family, flew from her brother's side, without any previous intimation of her design, and darted at the prisoner with the utmost fury.
Bishopriggs stopped in the middle of the room, thunder-struck at the aspersion cast on the wine.
I did not come back for your forgiveness," she exclaimed, passionately, as if clamouring against an unjust aspersion.
Peggotty seemed to take this aspersion very much to heart, I thought.
He said sharply that it was not very likely, as if defending the absent victim of the accident from an unkind aspersion.
She said this not disparagingly, but affectionately rather, as though, by acknowledging the worst about him, she wished to protect him from the aspersions of her friends.
Let us now pause and ask ourselves whether, in the course of these papers, the proposed Constitution has not been satisfactorily vindicated from the aspersions thrown upon it; and whether it has not been shown to be worthy of the public approbation, and necessary to the public safety and prosperity.