aspiration


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Related to aspiration: aspiration pneumonia

as·pi·ra·tion

 (ăs′pə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Expulsion of breath in speech.
2. Linguistics
a. The pronunciation of a consonant with an aspirate.
b. A speech sound produced with an aspirate.
3.
a. The act of breathing in; inhalation.
b. The act of drawing something, as liquid or a foreign object, into the respiratory tract when taking a breath.
4. Medicine The process of removing fluids or gases from the body with a suction device.
5.
a. A strong desire for high achievement.
b. An object of such desire; an ambition.

aspiration

(ˌæspɪˈreɪʃən)
n
1. strong desire to achieve something, such as success
2. the aim of such desire
3. (Physiology)
a. the act of breathing
b. a breath
4. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics
a. the pronunciation of a stop with an audible and forceful release of breath
b. the friction of the released breath
c. an aspirated consonant
5. (Medicine) removal of air or fluid from a body cavity by suction
6. (Medicine) med
a. the sucking of fluid or foreign matter into the air passages of the body
b. the removal of air or fluid from the body by suction
ˌaspiˈrational adj
aspiratory adj

as•pi•ra•tion

(ˌæs pəˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. a strong desire, longing, or hope; ambition.
2. a goal or objective desired: The presidency had been his aspiration since college.
3. an act of aspirating, esp. inhalation.
4.
a. the articulation of a speech sound accompanied by an audible puff of breath.
b. the use of an aspirate in pronunciation.
5.
a. the act of removing a fluid, as pus or serum, from a cavity of the body by a hollow needle or trocar connected with a suction syringe.
b. the act of inhaling fluid or a foreign body into the bronchi and lungs, often after vomiting.
[1375–1425; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Latin]
as`pi•ra′tion•al, adj.

aspiration

The use of suction to remove fluid from a body cavity, for example using a tube or syringe.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aspiration - a will to succeedaspiration - a will to succeed      
ambitiousness, ambition - a strong drive for success
2.aspiration - a cherished desireaspiration - a cherished desire; "his ambition is to own his own business"
desire - the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state
American Dream - the widespread aspiration of Americans to live better than their parents did
emulation - ambition to equal or excel
nationalism - the aspiration for national independence felt by people under foreign domination
3.aspiration - a manner of articulation involving an audible release of breath
articulation - the aspect of pronunciation that involves bringing articulatory organs together so as to shape the sounds of speech
4.aspiration - the act of inhalingaspiration - the act of inhaling; the drawing in of air (or other gases) as in breathing
breathing, external respiration, respiration, ventilation - the bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation
breath - the process of taking in and expelling air during breathing; "he took a deep breath and dived into the pool"; "he was fighting to his last breath"
gasp, pant - a short labored intake of breath with the mouth open; "she gave a gasp and fainted"
drag, pull, puff - a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke); "he took a puff on his pipe"; "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly"

aspiration

noun aim, longing, end, plan, hope, goal, design, dream, wish, desire, object, intention, objective, ambition, craving, endeavour, yearning, eagerness, Holy Grail (informal), hankering the needs and aspirations of our pupils
Quotations
"An aspiration is a joy for ever, a possession as solid as a landed estate, a fortune which we can never exhaust and which gives us year by a year a revenue of pleasurable activity" [Robert Louis Stevenson El Dorado]

aspiration

noun
1. A strong desire to achieve something:
2. A fervent hope, wish, or goal:
Translations
طُموح، مَطامِح
aspirace
aspirationstræben
metnaîarlöngun, metnaîur
吸引
ašpirácia

aspiration

[ˌæspəˈreɪʃən] N (also Ling) → aspiración f

aspiration

[ˌæspɪˈreɪʃən] naspiration f

aspiration

n
(hohes) Ziel, Aspiration f (geh); his aspiration towards (Brit) or toward (US) Lady Sarah’s hand (liter)seine Hoffnung auf Lady Sarahs Hand
(Phon) → Aspiration f, → Behauchung f

aspiration

[ˌæspəˈreɪʃn] naspirazione f

aspire

(əˈspaiə) verb
(usually with to) to try very hard to reach (something difficult, ambitious etc). He aspired to the position of president.
ˌaspiˈration (ӕspi-) noun
(often in plural) an ambition. aspirations to become a writer.

as·pi·ra·tion

n. aspiración, inhalación, succión, extracción de un líquido sin dejar entrar el aire;
___ biopsybiopsia con aguja.

aspiration

n aspiración f; needle — aspiración con aguja
References in classic literature ?
Marrable's servants entered the theater as that desperate aspiration escaped the governess.
But, in our youthful ecstasy, I don't think that we really looked before us or behind us; or had any aspiration beyond the ignorant present.
Wopsle said grace with theatrical declamation - as it now appears to me, something like a religious cross of the Ghost in Hamlet with Richard the Third - and ended with the very proper aspiration that we might be truly grateful.
They express the aspiration of the first martyr of philosophy, that he would leave behind him many followers, accompanied by the not unnatural feeling that they would be fiercer and more inconsiderate in their words when emancipated from his control.
To have his path made clear for him is the aspiration of every human being in our beclouded and tempestuous existence.
Perhaps Louisa thought that he had said more than was necessary, for she sighed, with an aspiration so low that it was scarcely audible to herself, and bent her head over her work again.
But I thought you wanted me to forget," said Newman, with that tone of simple deliberateness which frequently marked his utterance, and which an observer would not have known whether to pronounce a somewhat mysteriously humorous affection of ignorance or a modest aspiration to knowledge; "you told me you disliked them all.
He handled physical details as if there were nothing beyond them; yet spiritualized them all, and redeemed himself from materialism by his strong and eager aspiration towards the infinite.
It has been my purpose to suggest that, while this principle itself is strictly and simply the Human Aspiration for Supernal Beauty, the manifestation of the Principle is always found in an elevating excitement of the soul, quite independent of that passion which is the intoxication of the Heart, or of that truth which is the satisfaction of the Reason.
The odor of the canal was doubtless at the bottom of that aspiration and the breath of the garden, as I entered it, gave consistency to my purpose.
It is not likely he would have had the iron persistency of purpose to drag her through this new stern trial if he had not known that in her heart, as in his, there gnawed ever an all-devouring hunger to work land of their own, a fervent aspiration to establish a solid basis of self-sustentation upon which their children might build.
He and Jo listen to the music, probably with much the same amount of animal satisfaction; likewise as to awakened association, aspiration, or regret, melancholy or joyful reference to things beyond the senses, they are probably upon a par.