assert


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as·sert

 (ə-sûrt′)
tr.v. as·sert·ed, as·sert·ing, as·serts
1. To state or express positively; affirm: asserted his innocence.
2. To defend or maintain (one's rights, for example).
3. To put into action boldly; employ or demonstrate: asserted her independence.
Idiom:
assert oneself
To act boldly or forcefully, especially in defending one's rights or stating an opinion.

[Latin asserere, assert- : ad-, ad- + serere, to join; see ser- in Indo-European roots.]

as·sert′a·ble, as·sert′i·ble adj.
as·sert′er, as·ser′tor n.

assert

(əˈsɜːt)
vb (tr)
1. to insist upon (rights, claims, etc)
2. (may take a clause as object) to state to be true; declare categorically
3. to put (oneself) forward in an insistent manner
[C17: from Latin asserere to join to oneself, from serere to join]
asˈserter, asˈsertor n
asˈsertible adj

as•sert

(əˈsɜrt)

v.t.
1. to state strongly; affirm; aver: He asserted his innocence.
2. to maintain or defend (claims, rights, etc.).
3. to state as having existence; affirm; postulate: to assert a first cause as necessary.
Idioms:
assert oneself, to claim one's rights or declare one's views firmly and forcefully.
[1595–1605; < Latin assertus, past participle of asserere to claim < as- + serere to link]
as•sert′ed•ly, adv.
as•sert′er, as•ser′tor, n.
as•sert′i•ble, adj.
syn: See declare.

assert


Past participle: asserted
Gerund: asserting

Imperative
assert
assert
Present
I assert
you assert
he/she/it asserts
we assert
you assert
they assert
Preterite
I asserted
you asserted
he/she/it asserted
we asserted
you asserted
they asserted
Present Continuous
I am asserting
you are asserting
he/she/it is asserting
we are asserting
you are asserting
they are asserting
Present Perfect
I have asserted
you have asserted
he/she/it has asserted
we have asserted
you have asserted
they have asserted
Past Continuous
I was asserting
you were asserting
he/she/it was asserting
we were asserting
you were asserting
they were asserting
Past Perfect
I had asserted
you had asserted
he/she/it had asserted
we had asserted
you had asserted
they had asserted
Future
I will assert
you will assert
he/she/it will assert
we will assert
you will assert
they will assert
Future Perfect
I will have asserted
you will have asserted
he/she/it will have asserted
we will have asserted
you will have asserted
they will have asserted
Future Continuous
I will be asserting
you will be asserting
he/she/it will be asserting
we will be asserting
you will be asserting
they will be asserting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been asserting
you have been asserting
he/she/it has been asserting
we have been asserting
you have been asserting
they have been asserting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been asserting
you will have been asserting
he/she/it will have been asserting
we will have been asserting
you will have been asserting
they will have been asserting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been asserting
you had been asserting
he/she/it had been asserting
we had been asserting
you had been asserting
they had been asserting
Conditional
I would assert
you would assert
he/she/it would assert
we would assert
you would assert
they would assert
Past Conditional
I would have asserted
you would have asserted
he/she/it would have asserted
we would have asserted
you would have asserted
they would have asserted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.assert - state categoricallyassert - state categorically      
insist, take a firm stand - be emphatic or resolute and refuse to budge; "I must insist!"
allege, aver, say - report or maintain; "He alleged that he was the victim of a crime"; "He said it was too late to intervene in the war"; "The registrar says that I owe the school money"
predicate, proclaim - affirm or declare as an attribute or quality of; "The speech predicated the fitness of the candidate to be President"
2.assert - to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as trueassert - to declare or affirm solemnly and formally as true; "Before God I swear I am innocent"
hold - assert or affirm; "Rousseau's philosophy holds that people are inherently good"
claim, take - lay claim to; as of an idea; "She took credit for the whole idea"
attest - authenticate, affirm to be true, genuine, or correct, as in an official capacity; "I attest this signature"
declare - state firmly; "He declared that he was innocent"
declare - state emphatically and authoritatively; "He declared that he needed more money to carry out the task he was charged with"
protest - affirm or avow formally or solemnly; "The suspect protested his innocence"
assure, tell - inform positively and with certainty and confidence; "I tell you that man is a crook!"
3.assert - insist on having one's opinions and rights recognizedassert - insist on having one's opinions and rights recognized; "Women should assert themselves more!"
deport, comport, acquit, behave, conduct, bear, carry - behave in a certain manner; "She carried herself well"; "he bore himself with dignity"; "They conducted themselves well during these difficult times"
4.assert - assert to be true; "The letter asserts a free society"
postulate, posit - take as a given; assume as a postulate or axiom; "He posited three basic laws of nature"

assert

verb
1. state, argue, maintain, declare, allege, swear, pronounce, contend, affirm, profess, attest, predicate, postulate, avow, aver, asseverate, avouch (archaic) He asserted that the bill violated the First Amendment.
state deny, refute, rebut
2. insist upon, stress, defend, uphold, put forward, vindicate, press, stand up for The republics began asserting their right to govern themselves.
insist upon retract, disavow, disclaim
assert yourself be forceful, put your foot down (informal), put yourself forward, make your presence felt, exert your influence He's speaking up and asserting himself much more now.

assert

verb
1. To put into words positively and with conviction:
Idiom: have it.
2. To defend, maintain, or insist on the recognition of (one's rights, for example):
Translations
يُأكِّـديُـصِـر عَلى
tvrdittrvat na
fastholdehævdeholde fast på
puolustaaväittäävakuuttaa
staîhæfastanda fast á, halda fast fram
atkaklusbūti aktyviamreikalautireikštisužsispyręs
aizstāvētapgalvot
beyan etmekileri sürmeksavunmak

assert

[əˈsɜːt] VT
1. (= declare) → afirmar, aseverar; [+ innocence] → afirmar
2. (= insist on) [+ rights] → hacer valer
3. (= establish) [+ authority] → imponer
4. to assert o.simponerse

assert

[əˈsɜːrt] vt
(= establish) [+ authority] → affirmer
to assert o.s. → s'imposer, s'affirmer
(= declare) [+ innocence] → affirmer
(= state) [+ view, opinion] → affirmer

assert

vt
(= declare)behaupten; one’s innocencebeteuern
(= insist on) to assert one’s authorityseine Autorität geltend machen; to assert one’s rightssein Recht behaupten; to assert one’s independenceseine Unabhängigkeit demonstrieren; to assert oneselfsich behaupten or durchsetzen (over gegenüber); if you assert yourself too much you will lose their supportwenn Sie zu bestimmt auftreten, verlieren Sie ihre Unterstützung

assert

[əˈsɜːt] vt (declare) → affermare, asserire; (insist on, rights) → far valere
to assert o.s. → farsi valere

assert

(əˈsəːt) verb
1. to say definitely. She asserted that she had not borrowed his book.
2. to insist on. He should assert his independence.
asˈsertion (-ʃən) noun
asˈsertive (-tiv) adjective
(too) inclined to assert oneself.
assert oneself
to state one's opinions confidently and act in a way that will make people take notice of one. You must assert yourself more if you want promotion.

assert

vt. afirmar, sostener.
References in classic literature ?
Meg hardly knew herself, she felt so brave and independent, so glad to defend John and assert her right to love him, if she liked.
Let us then hope that this Mohican may not disappoint our wishes, but prove what his looks assert him to be, a brave and constant friend.
There are chaotic, blind, or drunken moments, in the lives of persons who lack real force of character,--moments of test, in which courage would most assert itself,--but where these individuals, if left to themselves, stagger aimlessly along, or follow implicitly whatever guidance may befall them, even if it be a child's.
Again a mystic sisterhood would contumaciously assert itself, as she met the sanctified frown of some matron, who, according to the rumour of all tongues, had kept cold snow within her bosom throughout life.
I freely assert, that the cosmopolite philosopher cannot, for his life, point out one single peaceful influence, which within the last sixty years has operated more potentially upon the whole broad world, taken in one aggregate, than the high and mighty business of whaling.
If the only whales that thus sank were old, meagre, and broken-hearted creatures, their pads of lard diminished and all their bones heavy and rheumatic; then you might with some reason assert that this sinking is caused by an uncommon specific gravity in the fish so sinking, consequent upon this absence of buoyant matter in him.
I have contemplated the imprisonment of the offender, rather than the seizure of his goods--though both will serve the same purpose--because they who assert the purest right, and consequently are most dangerous to a corrupt State, commonly have not spent much time in accumulating property.
Now that the queen was at ease in her mind once more, and measurably happy, her wine naturally began to assert itself again, and it got a little the start of her.
Thorndike, isn't that Plug you're riding an assert of the scrap you and Buffalo Bill had with the late Blake Haskins and his pal a few months back?
It is easily supposable that the thief was concealed in the house; that he knew of this box, and of its owner's habit of counting its contents and arranging his accounts at night--if he had that habit, which I do not assert, of course--that he tried to take the box while its owner slept, but made a noise and was seized, and had to use the knife to save himself from capture; and that he fled without his booty because he heard help coming.
By-and-by, fatigue began to assert its claims; the children tried to pay attention, for it was dreadful to think of sitting down when time was grown to be so precious, moving, in some direction, in any direction, was at least progress and might bear fruit; but to sit down was to invite death and shorten its pursuit.
I assert most unhesi- tatingly, that the religion of the south is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes,--a justifier of the most appalling barbarity,--a sanctifier of the most hateful frauds,--and a dark shelter under, which the darkest, foulest, grossest, and most infer- nal deeds of slaveholders find the strongest protec- tion.