assertoric


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Related to assertoric: Apodicticity

assertoric

(ˌæsɜːˈtɒrɪk)
adj
1. (Logic) (of a statement) stating a fact, as opposed to expressing an evaluative judgment
2. (Logic) obsolete judging what is rather than what may or must be
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Beliefs, Schafer thus proposes, present their contents with assertoric force.
Modalities, for him, pertain to the relations of predication, without challenging the assertoric system of deductions simpliciter.
With Rorty, I believe that Putnam is untenably trying to hold onto "the objectivity of assertoric discourse," given his concession that "our norms and standards of warranted assertability" are contingent and do not converge upon a "fact of the matter.
Those on pragmatics cover assertoric interia, (quasi) performatives and presupposition accommodation; and speech acts, cognition, and language use.
Similarly, given Kant's scant attention to happiness in the Groundwork, Allison Hills' 'Happiness in the Groundwork' (Chapter 2), which considers Kant's distinctive desire-satisfaction theory of happiness, the kind of end that happiness is, and the status of the imperatives of prudence as assertoric hypothetical imperatives (rather than problematic hypothetical imperatives or categorical imperatives), sheds light on an important topic all too easy to overlook.
When a religion makes assertoric statements about the nature of ultimate reality, it is doing more than merely expressing deep inner feelings; it is making statements the veracity, suitability, or cogency of which would seem to be open to public evaluation.
If we allowed that convention alone ruled the language-world relation, then the distinction between truth and falsity would collapse, and with it the possibility of assertoric speech.
The explaining propositions that render such terms are properly conditional, not assertoric in form.
85) See CRITIQUE, supra note 65, at 33 (noting that human happiness is an assertoric hypothetical imperative).
This is just the interrogative version of an assertoric implicative even if conditional: it has both an expectation understanding (`I expect not to be punished if I do not do anything wrong') and a nonpreclusive understanding (`Will my not doing anything wrong not preclude my being punished?
Hence every utterance, whatever its mode of utterance, is the utterance of an utterance-subject, apropos an utterance-object: for Hamburger, a question, a command, a wish are all equally as much utterances apropos some object as an assertoric proposition is.
In chapters two to four, Lameer outlines Farabi's assertoric syllogistic; in chapter five, his doctrines on induction; in chapter six, the paradigm; in chapter seven, the istidlal bi'l-shahid ala 'l-gha ib; and in chapter eight, the qiyas fiqhi.