assimilate


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as·sim·i·late

 (ə-sĭm′ə-lāt′)
v. as·sim·i·lat·ed, as·sim·i·lat·ing, as·sim·i·lates
v.tr.
1. Physiology
a. To consume and incorporate (nutrients) into the body after digestion.
b. To transform (food) into living tissue by the process of anabolism; metabolize constructively.
2. To incorporate and absorb into the mind: assimilate knowledge.
3. To make similar; cause to resemble.
4. Linguistics To alter (a sound) by assimilation.
5. To absorb (immigrants or a culturally distinct group) into the prevailing culture.
v.intr.
To become assimilated.

[Middle English assimilaten, from Latin assimilāre, assimilāt-, to make similar to : ad-, ad- + similis, like; see sem- in Indo-European roots.]

as·sim′i·la′tor n.

assimilate

(əˈsɪmɪˌleɪt)
vb
1. (tr) to learn (information, a procedure, etc) and understand it thoroughly
2. (Physiology) (tr) to absorb (food) and incorporate it into the body tissues
3. (intr) to become absorbed, incorporated, or learned and understood
4. (usually foll by: into or with) to bring or come into harmony; adjust or become adjusted: the new immigrants assimilated easily.
5. (usually foll by: to or with) to become or cause to become similar
6. (Phonetics & Phonology) (usually foll by to) phonetics to change (a consonant) or (of a consonant) to be changed into another under the influence of one adjacent to it: (n) often assimilates to ŋ before (k), as in "include".
[C15: from Latin assimilāre to make one thing like another, from similis like, similar]
asˈsimilable adj
asˈsimilably adv
asˌsimiˈlation n
asˈsimilative, asˈsimilatory adj
asˈsimiˌlator n
asˈsimilatively adv

as•sim•i•late

(v. əˈsɪm əˌleɪt; n. -lɪt, -ˌleɪt)

v. -lat•ed, -lat•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to take in and incorporate as one's own; absorb: to assimilate new ideas.
2. to bring into conformity with the customs, attitudes, etc., of a dominant cultural group or national culture.
3. to convert (ingested food) to substances suitable for incorporation into the body and its tissues.
4. to cause to resemble; make similar.
5. to compare; liken.
6. to modify (a sound) by assimilation.
v.i.
7. to be or become absorbed.
8. to conform or adjust to the customs, attitudes, etc., of a dominant cultural group.
9. (of ingested food) to be converted into the substance of the body.
10. to bear a resemblance (usu. fol. by to or with).
11. (of a sound) to become modified by assimilation.
n.
12. something that is assimilated.
[1570–80; < Latin assimilātus, past participle of assimilāre, -ulāre to make like, copy; see as-, simulate]
as•sim′i•la•tive (-ˌleɪ tɪv, -lə tɪv) as•sim′i•la•to`ry (-ləˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
as•sim′i•la`tor, n.

assimilate


Past participle: assimilated
Gerund: assimilating

Imperative
assimilate
assimilate
Present
I assimilate
you assimilate
he/she/it assimilates
we assimilate
you assimilate
they assimilate
Preterite
I assimilated
you assimilated
he/she/it assimilated
we assimilated
you assimilated
they assimilated
Present Continuous
I am assimilating
you are assimilating
he/she/it is assimilating
we are assimilating
you are assimilating
they are assimilating
Present Perfect
I have assimilated
you have assimilated
he/she/it has assimilated
we have assimilated
you have assimilated
they have assimilated
Past Continuous
I was assimilating
you were assimilating
he/she/it was assimilating
we were assimilating
you were assimilating
they were assimilating
Past Perfect
I had assimilated
you had assimilated
he/she/it had assimilated
we had assimilated
you had assimilated
they had assimilated
Future
I will assimilate
you will assimilate
he/she/it will assimilate
we will assimilate
you will assimilate
they will assimilate
Future Perfect
I will have assimilated
you will have assimilated
he/she/it will have assimilated
we will have assimilated
you will have assimilated
they will have assimilated
Future Continuous
I will be assimilating
you will be assimilating
he/she/it will be assimilating
we will be assimilating
you will be assimilating
they will be assimilating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been assimilating
you have been assimilating
he/she/it has been assimilating
we have been assimilating
you have been assimilating
they have been assimilating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been assimilating
you will have been assimilating
he/she/it will have been assimilating
we will have been assimilating
you will have been assimilating
they will have been assimilating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been assimilating
you had been assimilating
he/she/it had been assimilating
we had been assimilating
you had been assimilating
they had been assimilating
Conditional
I would assimilate
you would assimilate
he/she/it would assimilate
we would assimilate
you would assimilate
they would assimilate
Past Conditional
I would have assimilated
you would have assimilated
he/she/it would have assimilated
we would have assimilated
you would have assimilated
they would have assimilated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.assimilate - take up mentallyassimilate - take up mentally; "he absorbed the knowledge or beliefs of his tribe"
larn, learn, acquire - gain knowledge or skills; "She learned dancing from her sister"; "I learned Sanskrit"; "Children acquire language at an amazing rate"
imbibe - receive into the mind and retain; "Imbibe ethical principles"
2.assimilate - become similar to one's environment; "Immigrants often want to assimilate quickly"
adapt, conform, adjust - adapt or conform oneself to new or different conditions; "We must adjust to the bad economic situation"
acculturate - assimilate culturally
dissimilate - become dissimilar or less similar; "These two related tribes of people gradually dissimilated over time"
3.assimilate - make similarassimilate - make similar; "This country assimilates immigrants very quickly"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
dissimilate - make dissimilar; cause to become less similar
4.assimilate - take (gas, light or heat) into a solutionassimilate - take (gas, light or heat) into a solution
absorb - become imbued; "The liquids, light, and gases absorb"
5.assimilate - become similar in sound; "The nasal assimilates to the following consonant"
phonetics - the branch of acoustics concerned with speech processes including its production and perception and acoustic analysis
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
dissimilate - become dissimilar by changing the sound qualities; "These consonants dissimilate"

assimilate

verb
1. adjust, fit, adapt, accommodate, accustom, conform, mingle, blend in, become like, homogenize, acclimatize, intermix, become similar, acculturate They had been assimilated into the nation's culture.
2. learn, absorb, take in, incorporate, digest, imbibe (literary), ingest My mind could only assimilate one possibility at a time.

assimilate

verb
1. To take in and incorporate, especially mentally:
Informal: soak (up).
2. To represent as similar:
Translations
يُمَثِّل الطَّعَام بَعد هَضْمِه
přijímatstrávit
assimilereoptage
rinnastaa
asimilirati
asszimilál
melta; tileinka sér
asimiliacija
asimilēt
asimilovať
anlayıp kavramaközümlemeksindirmek

assimilate

[əˈsɪmɪleɪt]
A. VTasimilar
B. VIasimilarse

assimilate

[əˈsɪmɪleɪt]
vt [+ ideas, facts] → assimiler
to be assimilated (= absorbed) → être assimilé(e)
vis'assimiler
to assimilate into → s'assimiler dans

assimilate

vt food, informationaufnehmen; (fig: into society etc also) → integrieren; newcomers are easily assimilatedNeuankömmlinge können leicht integriert werden

assimilate

[əˈsɪmɪleɪt] vtassimilare

assimilate

(əˈsiməleit) verb
to take in and digest. Plants assimilate food from the earth; I can't assimilate all these facts at once.
asˌsimiˈlation noun

as·si·mi·late

vt. asimilar, convertir los alimentos en sustancias.
References in classic literature ?
It may seem marvellous that, with the world before her -- kept by no restrictive clause of her condemnation within the limits of the Puritan settlement, so remote and so obscure -- free to return to her birth-place, or to any other European land, and there hide her character and identity under a new exterior, as completely as if emerging into another state of being -- and having also the passes of the dark, inscrutable forest open to her, where the wildness of her nature might assimilate itself with a people whose customs and life were alien from the law that had condemned her -- it may seem marvellous that this woman should still call that place her home, where, and where only, she must needs be the type of shame.
They are in our homes; they are the associates of our children, and they form their minds faster than we can; for they are a race that children always will cling to and assimilate with.
Therefore what he gives (Whose praise be ever sung) to man in part Spiritual, may of purest Spirits be found No ingrateful food: and food alike those pure Intelligential substances require As doth your Rational; and both contain Within them every lower facultie Of sense, whereby they hear, see, smell, touch, taste, Tasting concoct, digest, assimilate, And corporeal to incorporeal turn.
It is less likely that he should have been able to compose or sing an English ballad; yet so much do we wish to assimilate Him of the Lion Heart to the band of warriors whom he led, that the anachronism, if there be one may readily be forgiven.
It can harmonize, assimilate, and protect the several parts and members, and extend the benefit of its foresight and precautions to each.
New thoughts, added to new impressions, would come pouring into my heart in a rich flood; and the more emotion, the more pain and labour, it cost me to assimilate these new impressions, the dearer did they become to me, and the more gratefully did they stir my soul to its very depths.
He was one of those fine, ingenuous natures which assimilate themselves easily to the dispositions of others.
He was a stern, gaunt man, with a harsh voice, and an aggressive manner, but he had the merit of knowing how to assimilate the ideas of other men, and to pass them on in a way which was intelligible and even interesting to the lay public, with a happy knack of being funny about the most unlikely objects, so that the precession of the Equinox or the formation of a vertebrate became a highly humorous process as treated by him.
Others have but to read an idea of somebody else's, and they can immediately assimilate it and believe that it was a child of their own brain.
Here the class was reciting a lesson from an abstruse text-book on economics, reciting it by rote, with so obvious a failure to assimilate it that the waste of labour was pitiful.
It would be no small business to remain herself, and yet to assimilate such an establishment.
He dwelt on this: and said several times that unless they tried to assimilate themselves to their conquerors, they must be swept away before the strides of civilised society.