assonance


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Related to assonance: onomatopoeia

as·so·nance

 (ăs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: "that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea" (William Butler Yeats).
2. The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
3. Rough similarity; approximate agreement.

[French, from Latin assonāre, to respond to : ad-, ad- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

as′so·nant adj. & n.
as′so·nan′tal (-năn′tl) adj.

assonance

(ˈæsənəns)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same vowel sound with different consonants or the same consonant with different vowels in successive words or stressed syllables, as in a line of verse. Examples are time and light or mystery and mastery
2. partial correspondence; rough similarity
[C18: from French, from Latin assonāre to sound, from sonāre to sound]
ˈassonant adj, n
assonantal adj

as•so•nance

(ˈæs ə nəns)

n.
1. similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. rhyme in which the same vowel sounds are used with different consonants in the stressed syllables of the rhyming words, as in penitent and reticence.
[1720–30; < French, =asson(ant) (< Latin assonant-, s. of assonāns, present participle of assonāre to sound; see as-, sound1)]
as′so•nant, adj., n.
as`so•nan′tal (-ˈnæn tl) as`so•nan′tic, adj.

assonance

- The condition of the words of a phrase or verse having the same sound or termination without rhyming.
See also related terms for rhyme.

assonance

likeness or approximate similarity in sound.
See also: Sound
resemblance of sound, particularly vowel sounds, occurring in words of close proximity.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

assonance

Use of words which repeat similar vowel sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Translations

assonance

[ˈæsənəns] Nasonancia f

assonance

nAssonanz f
References in periodicals archive ?
Individuality and eccentricity is expressed through engaging verse which plays with internal rhyme and assonance.
Alliteration, repetition, assonance, and consonance are all on display as the poem continues:
Vibrant assonance and smooth alliteration take the place of blank verse in imitation of Homer's measures, while the image transfers the soldiers' slumbering violence to their beached vessels of war.
Here a sparkling piece of assonance, there a witty, pithy truth, and over there - way over yonder, beyond the damp January thickets - some piece of wisdom you truly didn't know you had.
In general, the assonance strategy gives a Chinese sound similar to the English word and an associated interesting explanation.
Even if we don't consciously notice that the rhythm in these short lines is created by the consonance of repeated t sounds in "It's time to get," the assonance of repeated short e sounds in "get ready," and repeated long i sounds in "trifle like," we certainly hear a rhythmic pulsing beneath the surface of his words.
CHILDREN in the east of Cardiff have been testing their skills of rhyme and rhythm, assonance and alliteration in an area-wide poetry competition for Year Five pupils.
While Kavanagh's prose makes an effortless impression, it is actually very carefully crafted, with plenty of alliteration and assonance, wordplays, contrasts, colloquialisms, and strategically placed repetitions, all of which make it a joy to read.
alliteration (identifying words that start with the same sound), and assonance (similar vowel sounds repeated in the stressed syllable of a word)
Summary: Nicolas Artuso-Royer's "Carte Blanche" begins with a few minutes of sweet assonance.
As can be seen from Figure 1, the evaluation by athletes have not assonance with those by the judge.
In Torture Garden, the earlier of these two collections, alliteration and assonance not only contribute to, but in many ways define, the possibilities for interpretation associated with a given piece.