assonance


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Related to assonance: onomatopoeia

as·so·nance

 (ăs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: "that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea" (William Butler Yeats).
2. The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
3. Rough similarity; approximate agreement.

[French, from Latin assonāre, to respond to : ad-, ad- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

as′so·nant adj. & n.
as′so·nan′tal (-năn′tl) adj.

assonance

(ˈæsənəns)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same vowel sound with different consonants or the same consonant with different vowels in successive words or stressed syllables, as in a line of verse. Examples are time and light or mystery and mastery
2. partial correspondence; rough similarity
[C18: from French, from Latin assonāre to sound, from sonāre to sound]
ˈassonant adj, n
assonantal adj

as•so•nance

(ˈæs ə nəns)

n.
1. similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. rhyme in which the same vowel sounds are used with different consonants in the stressed syllables of the rhyming words, as in penitent and reticence.
[1720–30; < French, =asson(ant) (< Latin assonant-, s. of assonāns, present participle of assonāre to sound; see as-, sound1)]
as′so•nant, adj., n.
as`so•nan′tal (-ˈnæn tl) as`so•nan′tic, adj.

assonance

- The condition of the words of a phrase or verse having the same sound or termination without rhyming.
See also related terms for rhyme.

assonance

likeness or approximate similarity in sound.
See also: Sound
resemblance of sound, particularly vowel sounds, occurring in words of close proximity.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

assonance

Use of words which repeat similar vowel sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Translations

assonance

[ˈæsənəns] Nasonancia f

assonance

nAssonanz f
References in periodicals archive ?
CHILDREN in the east of Cardiff have been testing their skills of rhyme and rhythm, assonance and alliteration in an area-wide poetry competition for Year Five pupils.
They pile assonance and alliteration upon kennings, irregular rhymes, and syntax.
alliteration (identifying words that start with the same sound), and assonance (similar vowel sounds repeated in the stressed syllable of a word)
His rhythmical sense, his rhyming mood, and his rich assonance in creating the poems' atmosphere are effervescent, second to none.
Summary: Nicolas Artuso-Royer's "Carte Blanche" begins with a few minutes of sweet assonance.
Related to this reliance upon alliteration for meaning is Osundare's use of assonance and consonance as witness most of the Yoruba lexical items which litter the landscape of his poetry, for example in his The Eye of the Earth ogeere amokoyeri; elulu; agbegilodo; oro; iroko; patanmo; olosunta.
From a phonetic perspective rhyme can represent a complete or partial repetition of sound, depending on the predominant artistic norm; it appears as alliteration or assonance, as consonance or vocalic harmony.
Austin Clarke's "The Planter's Daughter" and "The Straying Student," omitted here, are not unsuccessful efforts to imitate the Gaelic linear pattern of assonance and consonance, and they produce a lyricism muted in later poetry.
Assonance in language: finding my teeth caked in the soil of land,
Knight's first line is significantly stronger than the two that follow because it sets up the dramatic situation and has a greater sonic resonance with the repetition of "done" and the assonance with the words "done" and "gone.
The alliteration and semi assonance between "colpa" and "casa" are striking:
However, there are other things you can use in English, such as alliteration and assonance, which to some extent can be employed to provide an echo at least in the reader's mind of the sound of classical Arabic," Davies said.