assonance

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as·so·nance

 (ăs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: "that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea" (William Butler Yeats).
2. The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
3. Rough similarity; approximate agreement.

[French, from Latin assonāre, to respond to : ad-, ad- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

as′so·nant adj. & n.
as′so·nan′tal (-năn′tl) adj.

assonance

(ˈæsənəns)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same vowel sound with different consonants or the same consonant with different vowels in successive words or stressed syllables, as in a line of verse. Examples are time and light or mystery and mastery
2. partial correspondence; rough similarity
[C18: from French, from Latin assonāre to sound, from sonāre to sound]
ˈassonant adj, n
assonantal adj

as•so•nance

(ˈæs ə nəns)

n.
1. similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. rhyme in which the same vowel sounds are used with different consonants in the stressed syllables of the rhyming words, as in penitent and reticence.
[1720–30; < French, =asson(ant) (< Latin assonant-, s. of assonāns, present participle of assonāre to sound; see as-, sound1)]
as′so•nant, adj., n.
as`so•nan′tal (-ˈnæn tl) as`so•nan′tic, adj.

assonance

- The condition of the words of a phrase or verse having the same sound or termination without rhyming.
See also related terms for rhyme.

assonance

likeness or approximate similarity in sound.
See also: Sound
resemblance of sound, particularly vowel sounds, occurring in words of close proximity.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

assonance

Use of words which repeat similar vowel sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Translations

assonance

[ˈæsənəns] Nasonancia f

assonance

nAssonanz f
References in periodicals archive ?
8) The first reference to it was by Firth, who called the assonances phon(a)esthemes; Bolinger originated the use of the terms rime and assonance in this context.
The poem's music is a matter of subtle assonances, alliterations, repetitions: notice the p's, s's and o's in "wrapped up .
Assonances alone are rare, as they usually combine with alliterations and/or rhymes.
In this field Adolfo Wildt and his contemporary artists created a sort of collection of samples of 20th century ceramics, where the great masters represented in the exhibition stand out for their assonances and poetic similarities and for their personal actions.
The redolent tonalities conveyed in Osundare's verse are produced through a deployment and application of phono-aesthetic elements as lexical matching, repetition, parallelism, tonal counterpoint, consonances, assonances, alliteration, and other allied sound symbols and images such as ideophones and onomatopoeia.
Toutes avaient des memes assonances, des memes rythmiques: l'unite des moyens, des objectifs.
BY FRANCES BELLERBY CarolAnn says: This beautiful poem with its gentle assonances ("light"/"meditate"; "friends"/"hands") captures - as the best poetry must - a moment in time.