assonance

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as·so·nance

 (ăs′ə-nəns)
n.
1. Resemblance of sound, especially of the vowel sounds in words, as in: "that dolphin-torn, that gong-tormented sea" (William Butler Yeats).
2. The repetition of identical or similar vowel sounds, especially in stressed syllables, with changes in the intervening consonants, as in the phrase tilting at windmills.
3. Rough similarity; approximate agreement.

[French, from Latin assonāre, to respond to : ad-, ad- + sonāre, to sound; see swen- in Indo-European roots.]

as′so·nant adj. & n.
as′so·nan′tal (-năn′tl) adj.

assonance

(ˈæsənəns)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the use of the same vowel sound with different consonants or the same consonant with different vowels in successive words or stressed syllables, as in a line of verse. Examples are time and light or mystery and mastery
2. partial correspondence; rough similarity
[C18: from French, from Latin assonāre to sound, from sonāre to sound]
ˈassonant adj, n
assonantal adj

as•so•nance

(ˈæs ə nəns)

n.
1. similarity of sounds in words or syllables.
2. rhyme in which the same vowel sounds are used with different consonants in the stressed syllables of the rhyming words, as in penitent and reticence.
[1720–30; < French, =asson(ant) (< Latin assonant-, s. of assonāns, present participle of assonāre to sound; see as-, sound1)]
as′so•nant, adj., n.
as`so•nan′tal (-ˈnæn tl) as`so•nan′tic, adj.

assonance

- The condition of the words of a phrase or verse having the same sound or termination without rhyming.
See also related terms for rhyme.

assonance

likeness or approximate similarity in sound.
See also: Sound
resemblance of sound, particularly vowel sounds, occurring in words of close proximity.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

assonance

Use of words which repeat similar vowel sounds.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assonance - the repetition of similar vowels in the stressed syllables of successive words
rhyme, rime - correspondence in the sounds of two or more lines (especially final sounds)
Translations

assonance

[ˈæsənəns] Nasonancia f

assonance

nAssonanz f
References in periodicals archive ?
Sans les assonances qui courent tout au long de la chanson et lui donnent son identite sonore la double lecture ne peut pas s'imposer comme une evidence.
Though Fried is certainly not the first (see Ricardou, Starobinski, Duchet, for example) to comb through passages of Mudame Bovary in search of alliterations, assonances and repetitions, what sets his work apart is his keen interest in the question of intention or consciousness, which others have left largely untouched.
Furthermore, and possibly even more ironically, by confining the study of imperialism to a national methodological framework, and by according centre stage to the British and French empires, postcolonial scholars have often unwittingly reproduced, rather than deconstructed, the hegemonic relations shaped in the course of the 18th and the 19th century, leaving largely unexplored the assonances and collusions that connected large-scale to small-scale empires, and policies implemented at home with extra-European colonial practices.
Toutes avaient des memes assonances, des memes rythmiques: l'unite des moyens, des objectifs.
BY FRANCES BELLERBY CarolAnn says: This beautiful poem with its gentle assonances ("light"/"meditate"; "friends"/"hands") captures - as the best poetry must - a moment in time.
Law captures the horse's lean, natural beauty in the elongated assonances and the slant rhymes that buttress the staccato "High Stepper.