assumed


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.
Related to assumed: attrite

as·sumed

 (ə-so͞omd′)
adj.
1. Taken up or used so as to deceive; pretended: an assumed name.
2. Taken for granted; supposed: an assumed increase in population.

as·sum′ed·ly (ə-so͞o′mĭd-lē) adv.

assumed

(əˈsjuːmd)
adj
1. false; fictitious: an assumed name.
2. taken for granted: an assumed result.
3. usurped; arrogated: an assumed authority.

as•sumed

(əˈsumd)

adj.
1. adopted in order to deceive; fictitious; pretended; feigned.
2. taken for granted; supposed.
3. usurped.
[1615–25]
as•sum′ed•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.assumed - adopted in order to deceive; "an assumed name"; "an assumed cheerfulness"; "a fictitious address"; "fictive sympathy"; "a pretended interest"; "a put-on childish voice"; "sham modesty"
counterfeit, imitative - not genuine; imitating something superior; "counterfeit emotion"; "counterfeit money"; "counterfeit works of art"; "a counterfeit prince"

assumed

adjective false, affected, made-up, pretended, fake, imitation, bogus, simulated, sham, counterfeit, feigned, spurious, fictitious, make-believe, pseudonymous, phoney or phony (informal) The articles were published under an assumed name.
false real, natural, actual, authentic

assumed

adjective
Being fictitious and not real, as a name:
Translations
غَير حَقيقي، مُنْتَحَـل
nepravýpředstíraný
falsk
uppgerîar-, falskur
nepravý

assumed

[əˈsjuːmd] ADJ [name] → falso, fingido
under an assumed namebajo or con (un) nombre falso

assumed

adj
assumed nameangenommener Name; (for secrecy etc also) → Deckname m
(= pretended) surprise, humilitygespielt, vorgetäuscht; in the assumed guise of a beggarals Bettler verkleidet

assume

(əˈsjuːm) verb
1. to take or accept as true. I assume (that) you'd like time to decide.
2. to take upon oneself or accept (authority, responsibility etc). He assumed the rôle of leader in the emergency.
3. to put on (a particular appearance etc). He assumed a look of horror.
asˈsumed adjective
pretended; not genuine. assumed astonishment; He wrote under an assumed name (= not using his real name).
asˈsumption (-ˈsamp-) noun
something assumed. On the assumption that we can produce four pages an hour, the work will be finished tomorrow.
References in classic literature ?
She assumed an injured air as they came in, never lifted her eyes from her book, or asked a single question.
They chatted incessantly: about the things around them; their amusing adventure out in the water-it had again assumed its entertaining aspect; about the wind, the trees, the people who had gone to the Cheniere; about the children playing croquet under the oaks, and the Farival twins, who were now performing the overture to "The Poet and the Peasant.
I like him not," said the lady, shuddering, partly in assumed, yet more in real terror.
It had the effect of banishing his assumed playfulness, which made his serious explanation the more irritating.
She appeared to be walking in a dream; or, more truly, the vivid life and reality assumed by her emotions made all outward occurrences unsubstantial, like the teasing phantasms of a half-conscious slumber.
This rag of scarlet cloth -- for time, and wear, and a sacrilegious moth had reduced it to little other than a rag -- on careful examination, assumed the shape of a letter.
A strange, apostolic whim having seized him, he had left Neskyeuna for Nantucket, where, with that cunning peculiar to craziness, he assumed a steady, common sense exterior and offered himself as a green-hand candidate for the Jeroboam's whaling voyage.
Schliemann assumed the proportions of a thunderstorm or an earthquake.
Instantly the flexible limbs of the child assumed the appearance of deformity and distortion, as, with his back humped up, and his master's stick in his hand, he hobbled about the room, his childish face drawn into a doleful pucker, and spitting from right to left, in imitation of an old man.
They had seen the LIBERTY ASSUMED by a VERY FEW deputies from a VERY FEW States, convened at Annapolis, of recommending a great and critical object, wholly foreign to their commission, not only justified by the public opinion, but actually carried into effect by twelve out of the thirteen States.
which I naturally assumed to be Women) interspersed with other Beings still smaller and of the nature of lustrous points -- all moving to and fro in one and the same Straight Line, and, as nearly as I could judge, with the same velocity.
The lion's head fixed its eyes thoughtfully upon the fire, and the whole chair assumed an aspect of deep meditation.