assumption


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to assumption: Assumption of Mary
click for a larger image
Assumption
c. 1670 painting, The Assumption of the Virgin, by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo

as·sump·tion

 (ə-sŭmp′shən)
n.
1. The act of taking to or upon oneself: assumption of an obligation.
2. The act of taking possession or asserting a claim: assumption of command.
3. The act of taking for granted: assumption of a false theory.
4. Something taken for granted or accepted as true without proof; a supposition: a valid assumption.
5. Presumption; arrogance.
6. Logic A minor premise.
7. Assumption Christianity The taking up of the Virgin Mary into heaven in body and soul after her death, observed as a feast on August 15.

[Middle English assumpcion, from Latin assūmptiō, assūmptiōn-, adoption, from assūmptus, past participle of assūmere, to adopt; see assume.]

assumption

(əˈsʌmpʃən)
n
1. the act of taking something for granted or something that is taken for granted
2. an assuming of power or possession of something
3. arrogance; presumption
4. (Logic) logic a statement that is used as the premise of a particular argument but may not be otherwise accepted. Compare axiom4
[C13: from Latin assūmptiō a taking up, from assūmere to assume]
asˈsumptive adj
asˈsumptively adv

Assumption

(əˈsʌmpʃən)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the taking up of the Virgin Mary (body and soul) into heaven when her earthly life was ended
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the feast commemorating this, celebrated by Roman Catholics on Aug 15

as•sump•tion

(əˈsʌmp ʃən)

n.
1. something taken for granted; a supposition.
2. the act of taking for granted or supposing.
3. the act of taking to or upon oneself.
4. the act of taking possession of something: the assumption of power.
5. arrogance; presumption.
6. the taking over of another's debts or obligations.
7.
a. (often cap.) the bodily taking up into heaven of the Virgin Mary following her death.
b. (cap.) a feast commemorating this, celebrated on August 15.
[1250–1300; < Latin assūmptiō <assūm(ere) to take up]

assumption

A supposition on the current situation or a presupposition on the future course of events, either or both assumed to be true in the absence of positive proof, necessary to enable the commander in the process of planning to complete an estimate of the situation and make a decision on the course of action.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.assumption - a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn; "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
posit, postulate - (logic) a proposition that is accepted as true in order to provide a basis for logical reasoning
major premise, major premiss - the premise of a syllogism that contains the major term (which is the predicate of the conclusion)
minor premise, minor premiss, subsumption - the premise of a syllogism that contains the minor term (which is the subject of the conclusion)
thesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument
precondition, stipulation, condition - an assumption on which rests the validity or effect of something else
scenario - a postulated sequence of possible events; "planners developed several scenarios in case of an attack"
2.assumption - a hypothesis that is taken for granted; "any society is built upon certain assumptions"
conclusion - an intuitive assumption; "jump to a conclusion"
cornerstone, fundament, groundwork, basis, foundation, base - the fundamental assumptions from which something is begun or developed or calculated or explained; "the whole argument rested on a basis of conjecture"
hypothesis, theory, possibility - a tentative insight into the natural world; a concept that is not yet verified but that if true would explain certain facts or phenomena; "a scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing becomes a scientific theory"; "he proposed a fresh theory of alkalis that later was accepted in chemical practices"
given, presumption, precondition - an assumption that is taken for granted
basic assumption, constatation, self-evident truth - an assumption that is basic to an argument
3.assumption - the act of taking possession of or power over something; "his assumption of office coincided with the trouble in Cuba"; "the Nazi assumption of power in 1934"; "he acquired all the company's assets for ten million dollars and the assumption of the company's debts"
acquisition - the act of contracting or assuming or acquiring possession of something; "the acquisition of wealth"; "the acquisition of one company by another"
4.assumption - celebration in the Roman Catholic Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life endedAssumption - celebration in the Roman Catholic Church of the Virgin Mary's being taken up into heaven when her earthly life ended; corresponds to the Dormition in the Eastern Orthodox Church
holy day of obligation - a day when Catholics must attend Mass and refrain from servile work, and Episcopalians must take Communion
Aug, August - the month following July and preceding September
5.assumption - (Christianity) the taking up of the body and soul of the Virgin Mary when her earthly life had endedAssumption - (Christianity) the taking up of the body and soul of the Virgin Mary when her earthly life had ended
Christian religion, Christianity - a monotheistic system of beliefs and practices based on the Old Testament and the teachings of Jesus as embodied in the New Testament and emphasizing the role of Jesus as savior
miracle - a marvellous event manifesting a supernatural act of a divine agent
6.assumption - audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
audaciousness, audacity - aggressive boldness or unmitigated effrontery; "he had the audacity to question my decision"
uppishness, uppityness - assumption of airs beyond one's station
7.assumption - the act of assuming or taking for granted; "your assumption that I would agree was unwarranted"
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen
position - the act of positing; an assumption taken as a postulate or axiom

assumption

assumption

noun
Translations
إفْتِراض
předpoklad
antagelseformodningforudsætninghimmelfartoptagelse i himlen
olettamusoletustaivaaseenastuminen
sem ráî er fyrir gert, ætlaîur
przypuszczeniewniebowstąpienie
domneva

assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃən]
A. N
1. (= supposition) → suposición f, supuesto m
on the assumption thatsuponiendo que, poniendo por caso que
we cannot make that assumptionno podemos dar eso por sentado
to start from a false assumptionpartir de una base falsa
2. (= taking) [of power, responsibility] → asunción f
3. the Assumption (Rel) → la Asunción
B. CPD Assumption Day NDía m de la Asunción

Assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃən] n (RELIGION) (also Assumption Day) → l'Assomption f

assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃən] n
(= supposition) → supposition f, hypothèse f
on the assumption that (= on the supposition that) → dans l'hypothèse où (= on condition that) → à condition que
to go on the assumption that ... → présumer que ...
to work on the assumption that ... → présumer que ...
(= taking on) the assumption of responsibility → la prise de responsabilité

assumption

n
Annahme f; (= presupposition)Voraussetzung f; to go on the assumption that …von der Voraussetzung ausgehen, dass …; the basic assumptions of this theory are …diese Theorie geht grundsätzlich davon aus, dass …
(of power, role, office etc)Übernahme f; (forcefully) → Ergreifen nt
(of guise, false name etc)Annahme f; (insincere: of look of innocence etc) → Vortäuschung f, → Aufsetzen nt
(Eccl) the AssumptionMariä Himmelfahrt f

assumption

[əˈsʌmpʃn] n
a. (supposition) → supposizione f, ipotesi f inv
on the assumption that → partendo dal presupposto che
to work on the assumption that → partire dal presupposto che
b. the Assumption (Rel) → l'Assunzione f

assume

(əˈsjuːm) verb
1. to take or accept as true. I assume (that) you'd like time to decide.
2. to take upon oneself or accept (authority, responsibility etc). He assumed the rôle of leader in the emergency.
3. to put on (a particular appearance etc). He assumed a look of horror.
asˈsumed adjective
pretended; not genuine. assumed astonishment; He wrote under an assumed name (= not using his real name).
asˈsumption (-ˈsamp-) noun
something assumed. On the assumption that we can produce four pages an hour, the work will be finished tomorrow.
References in classic literature ?
Carr having finished his coffee one morning, lingered a moment over his perfunctory paternal embraces, with the awkwardness of a preoccupied man endeavoring by the assumption of a lighter interest to veil another abstraction.
I certainly am," answered Phoebe, and added, with a little air of lady-like assumption (for, civil as the gentleman was, he evidently took her to be a young person serving for wages), "I am a cousin of Miss Hepzibah, on a visit to her.
He waited so long that I supposed it for the purpose of repudiating the assumption on which my action had been founded; but what he finally said was: "Do you mean now--here?
Such an extraordinary assumption of age by a girl of nineteen has never been seen in public before, in the whole course of my theatrical experience.
But, when his nephew, leaning an elbow on the table, covered his eyes thoughtfully and dejectedly with his hand, the fine mask looked at him sideways with a stronger concentration of keenness, closeness, and dislike, than was comportable with its wearer's assumption of indifference.
With what a demure assumption of being immensely older and wiser than I, the fairy little woman said I was 'a silly boy'; and then laughed so charmingly that I forgot the pain of being called by that disparaging name, in the pleasure of looking at her.
It was with considerable difficulty that I won him over to the assumption of a dress more like a prosperous farmer's; and we arranged that he should cut his hair close, and wear a little powder.
Of course she did," I returned, with a fine assumption of scorn,--"of course she did.
I shall come last," said Miss Wilson, irritated by his assumption that the party was a family one.
Every month they commemorate the assumption of the Virgin Mary, and are of opinion that no Christians beside themselves have a true sense of the greatness of the mother of God, or pay her the honours that are due to her.
Upon the principles of the Declaration of Independence, the dissolution of the ties of allegiance, the assumption of sovereign power, and the institution of civil government, are all acts of transcendent authority, which the people alone are competent to perform; and, accordingly, it is in the name and by the authority of the people, that two of these acts--the dissolution of allegiance, with the severance from the British Empire, and the declaration of the United Colonies, as free and independent States--were performed by that instrument.
At that hour the guests were departing in groups along the street, discoursing on the game, or continuing conversations on the land they were covetous of buying, on the terms of some one's will, on quarrels among heirs, on the haughty assumption of the aristocratic portion of the community.