astragalus

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as·trag·a·lus

 (ə-străg′ə-ləs)
n. pl. as·trag·a·li (-lī′)
1. The dried root of the East Asian herb Astragalus membranaceus of the pea family, used in herbal medicine. Also called milk vetch.
2. See milk vetch.
3. See talus1.

[New Latin, from Greek astragalos, vertebra; see ost- in Indo-European roots.]

as·trag′a·lar adj.

astragalus

(æˈstræɡələs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ)
(Anatomy) anatomy another name for talus1
[C16: via New Latin from Latin: astragal]

as•trag•a•lus

(æˈstræg ə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. (in higher vertebrates) one of the proximal bones of the tarsus.
[1535–45; < New Latin; see astragal]
as•trag′a•lar, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.astragalus - large genus of annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of north temperate regionsAstragalus - large genus of annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of north temperate regions; largest genus in the family Leguminosae
rosid dicot genus - a genus of dicotyledonous plants
Papilionoideae, subfamily Papilionoideae - alternative name used in some classification systems for the family Papilionaceae
milk vetch, milk-vetch - any of various plants of the genus Astragalus
2.astragalus - the bone in the ankle that articulates with the leg bones to form the ankle jointastragalus - the bone in the ankle that articulates with the leg bones to form the ankle joint
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
ankle, ankle joint, articulatio talocruralis, mortise joint - a gliding joint between the distal ends of the tibia and fibula and the proximal end of the talus
Translations

as·trag·a·lus

n. astrágalo, calus, hueso del tobillo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Yupingfeng composes of Astragali Radix (Huangqi; the root of Astragalus membranaceus (Fisch.
The herbal paste was composed of: Yinyanghuo (Herba Epimedii Brevicornus), Bajitian (Radix Morindae Officinalis), Huangqi (Radix Astragali Mongolici), Dangshen (Radix Codonopsis), Heshouwu (Radix Polygoni Multiflori), Huangjing (Rhizoma Polygonati Sibirici), Shudihuang (Radix Rehmanniae Preparata), Shanzhuyu (Fructus Corni), Maidong (Radix Ophiopogonis Japonici), Yeqiaomaigen (Fagopyrum Dibotrys Hara), Hutuiye (Lithocarpus Elaeagnifolia), Huangjingzi (Fructus Viticis Negundo), Fabanxia (prepared Pinellia Tuber), Pugongying (Herba Taraxaci Mongolici), Ejiao (Colla Corii Asi-ni), Guijiaiiao (Colla Carapacis Et Plastri Testudinis), Gejie (Gecko), Ziheche (Placenta Hominis), Baishen (White Ginseng), crystal sugar, and maltose.
The most common are ginseng, paeonia, pomegranate, white tea, Centella asiatica, Radix Astragali, Angelica root, Rhodiola, Saus-sureainvolucrate and.
The exhibits are mounted on and around tables and benches: candlesticks, a firkin, spiles, wooden and ceramic crockery (some broken), glassware (broken), cutlery, dice and more astragali, a Jew's harp and tuning pegs, potsherds and bones on the floor, rounded out by replicas of a barrei, crockery, food and playing cards.
While Astragalus has been investigated more for its immunomodulating abilities than its liver benefits, Radix Astragali and Fructus Schisandrae are the herbs most commonly employed as hepatoprotectives by traditional Chinese herbalists.
Available varieties include: Black, green, oolong, lemon green, chamomile green, green tea with jasmine, toast-rice tea, rose & tree-peony, peach beauty, roselle, blueberry, strawberry, sweet orange, rose-lycium, lyceum-chamomile, ginseng-radix astragali, ketsume, szu-wu ginger and ginseng tea.
Emerson (7) found a significant correlation between astragali dimensions and white-tailed deer live weight ([R.
Two calcanea and two astragali also have exostoses; one of these calcanea was probably fused with astragalus.
A sampling of topics includes the diet of Washington's soldiers at Valley Forge during the winter of 1777-78; the use of cattle in prehistoric Sardinia from the evidence of bronze statuettes; and the use of astragali (animal knucklebones) in various cultural practices throughout history.
Packed closely together were a large number of pieces of pottery, figurines, pig astragali, and other material, including another beautiful and elaborate cult stand.
The fossils consist mainly of isolated teeth and durable postcranial elements such as astragali, phalanges and metapodials that indicate that transportation and sorting of specimens has occurred (Hanson 1980).