astragalus


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Related to astragalus: Astragalus membranaceus

as·trag·a·lus

 (ə-străg′ə-ləs)
n. pl. as·trag·a·li (-lī′)
1. The dried root of the East Asian herb Astragalus membranaceus of the pea family, used in herbal medicine. Also called milk vetch.
2. See milk vetch.
3. See talus1.

[New Latin, from Greek astragalos, vertebra; see ost- in Indo-European roots.]

as·trag′a·lar adj.

astragalus

(æˈstræɡələs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ)
(Anatomy) anatomy another name for talus1
[C16: via New Latin from Latin: astragal]

as•trag•a•lus

(æˈstræg ə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
1. (in higher vertebrates) one of the proximal bones of the tarsus.
[1535–45; < New Latin; see astragal]
as•trag′a•lar, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.astragalus - large genus of annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of north temperate regionsAstragalus - large genus of annual or perennial herbs or shrubs of north temperate regions; largest genus in the family Leguminosae
rosid dicot genus - a genus of dicotyledonous plants
Papilionoideae, subfamily Papilionoideae - alternative name used in some classification systems for the family Papilionaceae
milk vetch, milk-vetch - any of various plants of the genus Astragalus
2.astragalus - the bone in the ankle that articulates with the leg bones to form the ankle jointastragalus - the bone in the ankle that articulates with the leg bones to form the ankle joint
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
ankle, ankle joint, articulatio talocruralis, mortise joint - a gliding joint between the distal ends of the tibia and fibula and the proximal end of the talus
Translations

as·trag·a·lus

n. astrágalo, calus, hueso del tobillo.
References in periodicals archive ?
The pollination ecology of Astragalus cibarius and Astragalus utahensis (Leguminosae).
h ms Hc N Fabaceae Adesmia miraflorensis Remy s ms, pj Nf N Adesmia spinosissima Meyen ex Vogel s pj Nf N Astragalus arequipensis Vogel hs ms, pj, b Hc N Astragalus dielsii J.
John's wort) herb, Coptis chinensis (gold thread, huang han) root, Artemisia hudoviciana (western mugwort) leaf, Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) root, glycyrrhizin, Schisandra chinensis (wu wei zi) fruit, Astragalus membranaceus (huang qi) root, Taraxacum officinale (dandelion) root, Arctium lappa (burdock) root, shosaiko-to, Xiao Chai Hu Tang, Salvia miltiorrhiza (Chinese sage, dan shen) root, salvianolic acid B, Fuzheng Huayu formula, Gynostemma pentaphyllum (jiao gu lan) root, and Ginkgo biloba seed.
But obviously it depends on the patient's general state, because tomorrow's session is long: there is the astragalus, the humerus, the neck of the humerus, perhaps we'll need to insert some bone material, so that's already a complex operation.
But obviously it depends on the patient's general state, because today's session is long: there is the astragalus, the humerus, the neck of the humerus, perhaps we'll need to insert some bone material, so that's already a complex operation.
Astragalus, Calia, Sophora, and Lupinus, which produce serious economic loss, particularly in the cattle industry because of their toxicity (Lynn, 1983; Lynn and Shupe, 1984).
Giving an example, he said the Fu Zhen therapy which employs Fu Zhen herbs like astragalus, ligustrum, ginseng, etc is an adjunct to chemotherapy and radiation, and can protect the immune system from damage, while dramatically increasing survival rates.
Immune-stimulating herbs in TCM include Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng), astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus), and dong quai (Angelica sinensis).
Astragalus has a long history of use in the East and is becoming more popular in the West.
Other immunity boosters include echinacea and the lesser-known astragalus, often used in traditional Chinese medicine, said Dr.
The genus Astragalus contains two other species which are listed as endangered in Illinois (INHD 2007).