astronomy


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as·tron·o·my

 (ə-strŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. as·tron·o·mies
1. The scientific study of matter and phenomena in the universe, especially in outer space, including the positions, dimensions, distribution, motion, composition, energy, and evolution of celestial objects.
2. A system of knowledge or beliefs about celestial phenomena: the various astronomies of ancient civilizations.

[Middle English astronomie, from Old French, from Latin astronomia, from Greek astronomiā : astro-, astro- + -nomiā, -nomy.]

astronomy

(əˈstrɒnəmɪ)
n
(Astronomy) the scientific study of the individual celestial bodies (excluding the earth) and of the universe as a whole. Its various branches include astrometry, astrodynamics, cosmology, and astrophysics
[C13: from Old French astronomie, from Latin astronomia, from Greek; see astro-, -nomy]

as•tron•o•my

(əˈstrɒn ə mi)

n.
the science that deals with the material universe beyond the earth's atmosphere.
[1175–1225; Middle English astronomie (< Anglo-French) < Latin astronomia < Greek. See astro-, -nomy]

as·tron·o·my

(ə-strŏn′ə-mē)
The scientific study of the universe and the objects in it, including stars, planets, and nebulae. Astronomy deals with the position, size, motion, composition, energy, and evolution of celestial objects. Astronomers analyze not only visible light but also radio waves, x-rays, and other ranges of radiation that come from sources outside the Earth's atmosphere.

Astronomy


the branch of astronomy that studies meteors.
the branch of astronomy that studies aerolites, or stony meteors.
the ratio between the light reflected from a surface and the total light falling upon that surface, as the albedo of the moon.
the point in the orbit of a heavenly body where it is farthest from the sun. Cf. perihelion.
in an orbit around a moon, the point furthest from the moon. Cf. perilune.
the astronomical studies of the planet Mars. — areologist, n.areologic, areological, adj.
Rare. a constellation or small group of unrelated stars. — asterismal, adj.
the art of navigating in space. Cf. astronavigation.astrogator, n.
the theory of the evolution of heavenly bodies.
a geological specialty that studies celestial bodies.
the branch of astronomy that studies the fixed stars.
a scientific analysis and mapping of the stars and planets. — astrographic, adj.
the worship of the heavenly bodies. Also called Sabaism. — astrolater, n.
1. a form of divination involving studying the stars.
2. Rare. astrology. Also called sideromancy.astromancer, n.astromantic, adj.
the branch of astronomy that studies the dimensions of heavenly bodies, especially the measurements made to determine the positions and orbits of various stars. — astrometric, astrometrical, adj.
the science of space travel, concerned with both the construction and the operation of vehicles that travel through interplanetary or interstellar space. Also called cosmonautics. — astronautic, astronautical, adj.astronaut, n.
a type of navigation involving observations of the apparent positions of heavenly bodies. Also called celestial navigation, celo-navigation. — astronavigator, n.
the science that studies the stars and other features of the material universe beyond the earth’s atmosphere. — astronomer, n. — astronomical, adj.
a person strongly attracted to knowledge about the stars. — astrophilic, adj.
a form of photography used to record astronomical phenomena.
the branch of astronomy concerned with the origin, and the chemical and physical nature of heavenly bodies. — astrophysicist, n.
astronavigation. Also called celo-navigation.
the study of stars through a telescope in which the star appears as a ring of light, in order to observe the star’s scintillation. — chromatoscope, n.
the fundamental theoretical basis of modern astronomy, first demonstrated in the early 16th century by Copernicus, who showed that the earth and the other planets orbit around the sun. Cf. Ptolemaism.
Obsolete, an instrument, like an astrolabe, used for astronomical observations.
astronautics. — cosmonaut. n.cosmonautical, adj.
an instrument used in astronomy to show the apparent movement of the sun.
an instrument originally designed for measuring the sun’s diameter, now used for measuring the angular distance between stars.
the practice of measuring the angular distance between stars by means of a heliometer. — heliometric, heliometrical, adj.
the period between the old moon and the new when the moon is invisible each month. — interlunar, adj.
an imaginary great circle in the sphere of the heavens, passing through the poles and the zenith and nadir of any point and intersecting the equator at right angles. See also 178. GEOGRAPHY. — meridian, meridional, adj.
the entire system of galaxies, including the Milky Way. — metagalactic, adj.
the periodic oscillation that can be observed in the precession of the earth’s axis and the precession of the equinoxes. See also 133. EARTH. — nutational, adj.
the inclination of the earth’s equator or the angle between the plane of the earth’s orbit and the plane of the equator (23°27’). Also called obliquity of the ecliptic. See also 133. EARTH. — obliquitous, adj.
the process of one heavenly body disappearing behind another as viewed by an observer.
a false moon, in reality a bright spot or a luminous ring surrounding the moon.
the point in the orbit of a heavenly body where it is nearest the sun. Also spelled perihelium. Cf. aphelion.
perihelion.
in orbit around a moon, the point nearest the moon. Cf. apolune.
Rare. a work or treatise on astronomy or celestial bodies.
1. a representation of the planetary system, particularly one in which the movements of the planets are simulated by projectors.
2. a room or building housing such an apparatus.
the branch of astronomy that studies the planets. — planetologist, n. — planetologic, planetological, adj.
a map showing half or more of the sphere of the heavens, indicating which part is visible at what hour from a given location. — planispheric, planispherical, adj.
the complicated demonstration of Ptolemy, 2nd-century geographer and astronomer, that the earth is the fixed center of the universe around which the sun and the other planets revolve; now discredited. Cf. Copemicanism.
a supporter of the Ptolemaic explanation of planetary motions.
the branch of astronomy that studies radio frequencies emitted by the sun, planets, and other celestial bodies.
astrolatry.
the religion of the Sabians, a group sometimes associated with worship of the sun, moon, and stars. See also religion.
the combination or configuration of the aspects of the planets and other heavenly bodies.
the scientific analysis and mapping of the moon’s physical features. — selenographer, selenographist, n.selenographic, selenographical, adj.
the branch of astronomy that studies the moon. — selenologist, n. — selenologic, selenological, adj.
a form of divination involving observations of the stars. Also called astromancy. — sideromancer, n.sideromantic, adj.
an abnormal fear of the stars.
Obsolete, astronomy.
the branch of astronomy that deals with the description of the heavens by constructing maps and charts, especially of the fixed stars. Also called uranology. — uranographer, uranographist, n. — uranographic, uranographical, adj.
1. a written description of the heavens and celestial bodies.
2. another term for astronomy.
1. a treatise recording the positions and magnitudes of heavenly bodies.
2. the science of measuring the real or apparent distances of heavenly bodies from Earth. — uranometrical, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.astronomy - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a wholeastronomy - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
phase - (astronomy) the particular appearance of a body's state of illumination (especially one of the recurring shapes of the part of Earth's moon that is illuminated by the sun); "the full phase of the moon"
absolute magnitude - (astronomy) the magnitude that a star would have if it were viewed from a distance of 10 parsecs (32.62 light years) from the earth
Hubble law, Hubble's law - (astronomy) the generalization that the speed of recession of distant galaxies (the red shift) is proportional to their distance from the observer
Kepler's law, Kepler's law of planetary motion - (astronomy) one of three empirical laws of planetary motion stated by Johannes Kepler
Copernican system - (astronomy) Copernicus' astronomical model in which the Earth rotates around the sun
Ptolemaic system - (astronomy) Ptolemy's model of the universe with the Earth at the center
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
astrodynamics - the branch of astronomy that studies the motion of natural and artificial bodies in space
astrometry - the branch of astronomy that deals with the measurement of the position and motion of celestial bodies
radio astronomy - the branch of astronomy that detects and studies the radio waves emitted by celestial bodies
celestial mechanics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the application of Newton's laws of motion to the motions of heavenly bodies
astrophysics - the branch of astronomy concerned with the physical and chemical properties of celestial bodies
selenology - the branch of astronomy that deals with the moon
solar physics - the branch of astronomy that deals with the sun
ascension - (astronomy) the rising of a star above the horizon
egress, emersion - (astronomy) the reappearance of a celestial body after an eclipse
ingress, immersion - (astronomy) the disappearance of a celestial body prior to an eclipse
alignment, conjunction - (astronomy) apparent meeting or passing of two or more celestial bodies in the same degree of the zodiac
inferior conjunction - (astronomy) the alignment of the Earth and a planet on the same side of the sun
superior conjunction - (astronomy) the alignment of the Earth and a planet on the opposite side of the sun
Oort cloud - (astronomy) a hypothetical huge collection of comets orbiting the sun far beyond the orbit of Pluto; perturbations (as by other stars) can upset a comet's orbit and may send it tumbling toward the sun
extragalactic nebula, galaxy - (astronomy) a collection of star systems; any of the billions of systems each having many stars and nebulae and dust; "`extragalactic nebula' is a former name for `galaxy'"
apoapsis, point of apoapsis - (astronomy) the point in an orbit farthest from the body being orbited
node - (astronomy) a point where an orbit crosses a plane
equinoctial point, equinox - (astronomy) either of the two celestial points at which the celestial equator intersects the ecliptic
vernal equinox - (astronomy) the equinoctial point that lies in the constellation of Pisces
autumnal equinox - (astronomy) the equinoctial point that lies in the constellation of Virgo
barycenter - (astronomy) the common center of mass around which two or more bodies revolve
culmination - (astronomy) a heavenly body's highest celestial point above an observer's horizon
limb - (astronomy) the circumferential edge of the apparent disc of the sun or the moon or a planet
periapsis, point of periapsis - (astronomy) the point in an orbit closest to the body being orbited
anomaly - (astronomy) position of a planet as defined by its angular distance from its perihelion (as observed from the sun)
celestial latitude, dec, declination - (astronomy) the angular distance of a celestial body north or to the south of the celestial equator; expressed in degrees; used with right ascension to specify positions on the celestial sphere
celestial longitude, right ascension, RA - (astronomy) the equatorial coordinate specifying the angle, measured eastward along the celestial equator, from the vernal equinox to the intersection of the hour circle that passes through an object in the sky; usually expressed in hours and minutes and seconds; used with declination to specify positions on the celestial sphere; "one hour of right ascension equals fifteen degrees"
asterism - (astronomy) a cluster of stars (or a small constellation)
canal - (astronomy) an indistinct surface feature of Mars once thought to be a system of channels; they are now believed to be an optical illusion
coma - (astronomy) the luminous cloud of particles surrounding the frozen nucleus of a comet; forms as the comet approaches the sun and is warmed
comet - (astronomy) a relatively small extraterrestrial body consisting of a frozen mass that travels around the sun in a highly elliptical orbit

astronomy

see planets, stars and constellations

Astronomy terms

achondrite, aerolite, aerospace, aerosphere, albedo, almucantar or almacantar, altitude, analemma, annular eclipse, anthelion, aphelion, apocynthion, apolune, appulse, apapsis, apsis or apse, asteroid, asteroid belt, astrobleme, atmosphere, aureola or aureole, aurora, aurora australis, aurora borealis, azimuth, barycentre, basin, binary star, black drop, black hole, blue straggler, bolide, brown dwarf, burst, cataclysmic variable, Cepheid variable, Chandrasekhar limit, chemosphere, chondrite, chromosphere, circumlunar, circumpolar, circumsolar, circumstellar, cislunar, cluster, collapsar, colour index, colure, coma, comet, companion, conjunction, constellation, cooordinate system, Copernican system, corona, cosmic, cosmogony, cosmology, crater, crescent, crust, culmination, cusp, dwarf, dynamics, eccentric, ecosphere, effective temperature, ejecta, ellipse, elongation, emersion, ephemeris, epoch, equator, escape velocity, equinox, evection, evolved star, exosphere, extinction, facula, farside, filament, fireball, flare, flocculus, galactic centre, galactic equator, galactic rotation, galaxy, giant, gravitation, heliocentric system, heliosphere, immersion or ingress, inclination, inequality, inertia, inferior planet, inner planet, insolation, interplanetary, interstellar, ionosphere, jet, light year, limb, lodestar or loadstar, luminosity, lunar, lunar eclipse, magnetosphere, magnitude, major planet, maria, mass, mass loss, mass transfer, merger, meridian, meridian passage, mesosphere, metallicity, metal ratio, meteor, meteorite, meteoroid, meteoroid stream, meteor shower, meteor storm, missing mass, molecular cloud, moonquake, moving cluster, multiple star, nadir, naked singularity, nearside, nebula, neutron star, new moon, node, north celestial pole, northern hemisphere, northern lights, northing, north polar distance, nova, nucleosynthesis, nucleus, nutation, oblateness, obliquity, observatory, occultation, octant, open cluster, opposition, orbit, orbital elements, orbital velocity, oscillating universe, outer planet, parallax, partial eclipse, penumbral eclipse, periapsis, periastron, percentre, perigee, perihelion, photosphere, physical libration, plages, planetary, planetary alignment, planetary system, planetesimal, planetoid, plasmasphere, plerion, polar axis, pole, precession, precession of the equinoxes, primary, prominence, proper motion, protogalaxy, protoplanet, protostar, Ptolemaic system, pulsating universe, pulsating variable, quadrature, quarter, quasar, quasi-stellar object, quiet, radiant, radio source, ray, reciprocal mass, red giant, red supergiant, regolith, retardation, revolution, ring, ring plain, rising, rotation, rupes, saros, satellite, Schwarzschild radius, scintillation, secondary, sextile, Seyfert galaxy, shell star, shepherd satellite, sidereal time, singularity, solar, solar constant, solar eclipse, solar spectrum, solar system, solstice, south celestial pole, southern hemisphere, southern lights, southing, south polar distance, space, spacetime, spectral type or spectral class, spherule, spicule, spinar, spray, star, star cloud, stellar, stellar evolution, stellar structure, stellar wind, Strömgren sphere, sublunar point, subsolar point, substellar point, sunspot, sunspot cycle, supercluster, supergiant, superior planet, supernova, symbiotic star, synodic period, syzygy, telluric line, terminator, terrestrial planet, tidal capture, tidal force, tidal friction, tide, total eclipse, total magnitude, thermosphere, train, transient lunar phenomena, triple star, tropical year, troposphere, universal time, universe, variable star, variation, velocity dispersion, vertical circle, visual magnitude, white dwarf, white hole, zenith, zenith distance
Translations
Sterrekunde
علم الفلكعِلْمُ الفَلَكعِلْم الفَلَكفلك
астрономия
astronomie
astronomi
tähtitiedeastronomia
astronomijazvjezdoznanstvo
csillagászatasztronómia
astronomia
stjörnufræðistjörnufræîi
天文学
천문학
astronomasastronomijaastronominis
astronomija
astronomie
astronómia
astronomija
astronomi
ดาราศาสตร์
astronomigökbilim
Астрономія
thiên văn học

astronomy

[əsˈtrɒnəmɪ] Nastronomía f

astronomy

[əˈstrɒnəmi] nastronomie f

astronomy

nAstronomie f

astronomy

[əsˈtrɒnəmɪ] nastronomia

astronomy

(əˈstronəmi) noun
the study of the stars and their movements. He is studying astronomy.
aˈstronomer noun
astronomic(al) (ӕstrəˈnomik(l)) adjective
1. (of numbers or amounts) very large. The cost of the new building was astronomical.
2. of astronomy. astronomical observations.

astronomy

عِلْمُ الفَلَك astronomie astronomi Astronomie αστρονομία astronomía tähtitiede astronomie astronomija astronomia 天文学 천문학 astronomie astronomi astronomia astronomia астрономия astronomi ดาราศาสตร์ astronomi thiên văn học 天文学
References in classic literature ?
As I live he's comparing notes; looking at his thigh bone; thinks the sun is in the thigh, or in the calf, or in the bowels, I suppose, as the old women talk Surgeon's Astronomy in the back country.
A phenomenon solved by modern philosophy and astronomy.
My days I devote to reading and to experiments in chemistry, and I spend many of the clear nights in the study of astronomy.
Philosophy, astronomy, and politics were marked at zero, I remember.
The poet alone knows astronomy, chemistry, vegetation and animation, for he does not stop at these facts, but employs them as signs.
Moreover, his father, who was a man of thorough instruction, omitted no opportunity to consolidate this keen intelligence by serious studies in hydrography, physics, and mechanics, along with a slight tincture of botany, medicine, and astronomy.
The gentleman attached to my person taught me everything he knew himself - mathematics, a little geometry, astronomy, fencing and riding.
And as the undefinable essence of the force moving the heavenly bodies, the undefinable essence of the forces of heat and electricity, or of chemical affinity, or of the vital force, forms the content of astronomy, physics, chemistry, botany, zoology, and so on, just in the same way does the force of free will form the content of history.
Suddenly a picture presented itself before her, without any effort on her part as pictures will, of herself in these very rooms; she had come in from a lecture, and she held a pile of books in her hand, scientific books, and books about mathematics and astronomy which she had mastered.
A period wherein science was raped by the metaphysicians, wherein physics became a search for the Philosopher's Stone, wherein chemistry became alchemy, and astronomy became astrology.
An astrolabe was an instrument used in astronomy to find out the distance of stars from the earth, the position of the sun and moon, the length of days, and many other things about the heavens and their bodies.
It dealt in moral and practical maxims, in information on technical subjects which are of service in daily life -- agriculture, astronomy, augury, and the calendar -- in matters of religion and in tracing the genealogies of men.

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