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foot

foot

 (fo͝ot)
n. pl. feet (fēt)
1. The lower extremity of the vertebrate leg that is in direct contact with the ground in standing or walking.
2. A structure used for locomotion or attachment in an invertebrate animal, such as the muscular organ extending from the ventral side of a mollusk.
3. Something suggestive of a foot in position or function, especially:
a. The lowest part; the bottom: the foot of a mountain; the foot of a page.
b. The end opposite the head, top, or front: the foot of a bed; the foot of a parade.
c. The termination of the leg of a piece of furniture, especially when shaped or modeled.
d. The part of a sewing machine that holds down and guides the cloth.
e. Nautical The lower edge of a sail.
f. Printing The part of a type body that forms the sides of the groove at the base.
g. Botany The base of the sporophyte in mosses and liverworts.
4. The inferior part or rank: at the foot of the class.
5. The part of a stocking or high-topped boot that encloses the foot.
6.
a. A manner of moving; a step: walks with a light foot.
b. Speed or momentum, as in a race: "the only other Democrats who've demonstrated any foot till now" (Michael Kramer).
7. (used with a pl. verb) Foot soldiers; infantry.
8.
a. A unit of poetic meter consisting of stressed and unstressed syllables in any of various set combinations. For example, an iambic foot has an unstressed followed by a stressed syllable.
b. In classical quantitative verse, a unit of meter consisting of long and short syllables in any of various set combinations.
9. Abbr. ft. or ft A unit of length in the US Customary and British Imperial systems equal to 12 inches (0.3048 meter). See Table at measurement.
10. foots Sediment that forms during the refining of oil and other liquids; dregs.
v. foot·ed, foot·ing, foots
v.intr.
1. To go on foot; walk. Often used with it: When their car broke down, they had to foot it the rest of the way.
2. To dance. Often used with it: "We foot it all the night / weaving olden dances" (William Butler Yeats).
3. Nautical To make headway; sail.
v.tr.
1. To go by foot over, on, or through; tread.
2. To execute the steps of (a dance).
3. To add up (a column of numbers) and write the sum at the bottom; total: footed up the bill.
4. To pay; defray: footed the expense of their children's education.
5. To provide (a stocking, for example) with a foot.
Idioms:
at (someone's) feet
Enchanted or fascinated by another.
best foot forward
A favorable initial impression: He always has his best foot forward when speaking to his constituents. Put your best foot forward during an employment interview.
feet of clay
An underlying weakness or fault: "They discovered to their vast discomfiture that their idol had feet of clay, after placing him upon a pedestal" (James Joyce).
foot in the door Slang
1. An initial point of or opportunity for entry.
2. A first step in working toward a goal.
get (one's) feet wet
To start a new activity or job.
have one foot in the grave Informal
To be on the verge of death, as from illness or severe trauma.
have (one's) feet on the ground
To be sensible and practical about one's situation.
on (one's) feet
1. Standing up: The crowd was on its feet for the last ten seconds.
2. Fully recovered, as after an illness or convalescence: The patient is on her feet again.
3. In a sound or stable operating condition: put the business back on its feet after years of mismanagement.
4. In an impromptu situation; extemporaneously: "Politicians provide easy targets for grammatical nitpickers because they have to think on their feet" (Springfield MA Morning Union).
on the right foot
In an auspicious manner: The project started off on the right foot but soon ran into difficulties.
on the wrong foot
In an inauspicious manner: The project started off on the wrong foot.

[Middle English fot, from Old English fōt; see ped- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: In Standard English, foot and feet have their own rules when they are used in combination with numbers to form expressions for units of measure: a four-foot plank, but not a four feet plank; also correct is a plank four feet long (or, less frequently, four foot long). When foot is combined with numbers greater than one to refer to simple distance, however, only the plural feet is used: a ledge 20 feet (not foot) away. At that speed, a car moves 88 feet (not foot) in a second.
Our Living Language In certain contexts, some people in New England and the South use constructions such as three foot and five mile in place of Standard English three feet and five miles. Some speakers extend this practice to measures of time, as in He was gone three year, though this is not as common. See Note at plural.

foot

(fʊt)
n, pl feet (fiːt)
1. (Anatomy) the part of the vertebrate leg below the ankle joint that is in contact with the ground during standing and walking.
2. (Clothing & Fashion) the part of a garment that covers a foot
3. (Zoology) any of various organs of locomotion or attachment in invertebrates, including molluscs
4. (Botany) botany the lower part of some plant structures, as of a developing moss sporophyte embedded in the parental tissue
5. (Units)
a. a unit of length equal to one third of a yard or 12 inches. 1 Imperial foot is equivalent to 0.3048 metre. Abbreviation: ft
b. any of various units of length used at different times and places, typically about 10 per cent greater than the Imperial foot
6. any part resembling a foot in form or function: the foot of a chair.
7. the lower part of something; base; bottom: the foot of the page; the foot of a hill.
8. the end of a series or group: the foot of the list.
9. manner of walking or moving; tread; step: a heavy foot.
10. (Military)
a. infantry, esp in the British army
b. (as modifier): a foot soldier.
11. (Knitting & Sewing) any of various attachments on a sewing machine that hold the fabric in position, such as a presser foot for ordinary sewing and a zipper foot
12. (Music, other) music
a. a unit used in classifying organ pipes according to their pitch, in terms of the length of an equivalent column of air
b. this unit applied to stops and registers on other instruments
13. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) printing
a. the margin at the bottom of a page
b. the undersurface of a piece of type
14. (Poetry) prosody a group of two or more syllables in which one syllable has the major stress, forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
15. a foot in the door an action, appointment, etc, that provides an initial step towards a desired goal, esp one that is not easily attainable
16. kick with the wrong foot Scot and Irish to be of the opposite religion to that which is regarded as acceptable or to that of the person who is speaking
17. my foot! an expression of disbelief, often of the speaker's own preceding statement: he didn't know, my foot! Of course he did!.
18. of foot archaic in manner of movement: fleet of foot.
19. on foot
a. walking or running
b. in progress; astir; afoot
20. one foot in the grave informal near to death
21. on the right foot informal in an auspicious manner
22. on the wrong foot informal in an inauspicious manner
23. put a foot wrong to make a mistake
24. put one's best foot forward
a. to try to do one's best
b. to hurry
25. put one's foot down informal
a. to act firmly
b. to increase speed (in a motor vehicle) by pressing down on the accelerator
26. put one's foot in it informal to blunder
27. set on foot to initiate or start (something)
28. tread under foot to oppress
29. under foot on the ground; beneath one's feet
vb
30. (Dancing) to dance to music (esp in the phrase foot it)
31. (tr) to walk over or set foot on; traverse (esp in the phrase foot it)
32. (tr) to pay the entire cost of (esp in the phrase foot the bill)
33. (usually foll by up) archaic or dialect to add up
[Old English fōt; related to Old Norse fōtr, Gothic fōtus, Old High German fuoz, Latin pēs, Greek pous, Sanskrit pad]
ˈfootless adj
Usage: In front of another noun, the plural for the unit of length is foot: a 20-foot putt; his 70-foot ketch. Foot can also be used instead of feet when mentioning a quantity and in front of words like tall: four foot of snow; he is at least six foot tall

Foot

(fʊt)
n
(Biography) Michael (Mackintosh). 1913–2010, British Labour politician and journalist; secretary of state for employment (1974–76); leader of the House of Commons (1976–79); leader of the Labour Party (1980–83)

foot

(fʊt)

n., pl. feet for 1-4, 8-16, 19, 21; foots for 20;
1. (in vertebrates) the terminal part of the leg, below the ankle joint, on which the body stands and moves.
2. (in invertebrates) any part similar in position or function.
3. a unit of length, orig. derived from the length of the human foot, that is divided into 12 inches and equal to 30.48 centimeters. Abbr.: ft., f.
4. walking or running motion; pace: swift of foot.
5. quality or character of movement or motion; tread; step.
6. any part or thing resembling a foot, as in function, placement, or shape.
7. a shaped or ornamented feature terminating the lower part of a leg or serving as the base of a piece of furniture.
8. a rim, flange, or flaring part, often distinctively treated, serving as a base for a table furnishing or utensil, as a glass, teapot, or candlestick.
9. the part of a stocking, sock, etc., covering the foot.
10. an attachment on a sewing machine that holds and guides the fabric.
11. the lowest part, or bottom, as of a hill, ladder, or page.
12. a supporting part; base.
13. the part of anything opposite the top or head: the foot of a bed.
14. Print. the part of the type body that forms the sides of the groove, at the base.
15. the last, as of a series.
16. that which is written at the bottom, as the total of an account.
17. a group of syllables constituting a metrical unit of a verse.
18. Usu., foots.
a. sediment or dregs.
b. footlights.
19. Naut. the lower edge of a sail.
v.i.
20. to walk; go on foot (often fol. by it): We'll have to foot it.
21. to move the feet rhythmically, as to music or in dance (often fol. by it).
22. (of a boat) to move forward; sail.
v.t.
23. to walk or dance on.
24. to perform (a dance).
25. to traverse on or as if on foot.
26. to make or attach a foot to.
27. to pay or settle: to foot the bill.
28. to add (a column of figures) and set the sum at the foot.
29. to seize with talons, as a hawk.
30. to establish.
31. Archaic. to kick, esp. to kick away.
32. Obs. to set foot on.
Idioms:
1. get off on the right (or wrong) foot, to begin well (or badly).
2. on foot, by walking or running: to travel on foot.
3. put one's foot down, to take a firm stand; be decisive or determined.
4. put one's foot in one's mouth, to make an embarrassing blunder.
5. set foot on or in, to go on or into; enter: Don't set foot in this office again!
6. under foot, in the way.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English fōt]

foot

(fo͝ot)
Plural feet (fēt)
A unit of length equal to 1/3 of a yard or 12 inches (about 30.5 centimeters). See Table at measurement.

foot

1. part of the body

Your foot is the part of your body at the end of your leg. Your foot includes your toes.

He kept on running despite the pain in his foot.

When you use foot with this meaning, its plural is feet.

She's got very small feet.

If someone goes somewhere on foot, they walk, rather than using some form of transport.

The city should be explored on foot.
2. measurements

A foot is also a unit for measuring length, equal to 12 inches or 30.48 centimetres. When foot has this meaning, its usual plural is feet.

We were only a few feet away from the edge of the cliff.
The planes flew at 65,000 feet.

However, you can use foot as the plural in front of words like high, tall, and long.

She's five foot eight inches tall.

You always use foot as the plural in front of another noun. For example, if a gap is twenty feet wide, you refer to it as a 'twenty foot gap'. Don't refer to it as a 'twenty feet gap'.

The prison was enclosed by a forty foot wall.

foot


Past participle: footed
Gerund: footing

Imperative
foot
foot
Present
I foot
you foot
he/she/it foots
we foot
you foot
they foot
Preterite
I footed
you footed
he/she/it footed
we footed
you footed
they footed
Present Continuous
I am footing
you are footing
he/she/it is footing
we are footing
you are footing
they are footing
Present Perfect
I have footed
you have footed
he/she/it has footed
we have footed
you have footed
they have footed
Past Continuous
I was footing
you were footing
he/she/it was footing
we were footing
you were footing
they were footing
Past Perfect
I had footed
you had footed
he/she/it had footed
we had footed
you had footed
they had footed
Future
I will foot
you will foot
he/she/it will foot
we will foot
you will foot
they will foot
Future Perfect
I will have footed
you will have footed
he/she/it will have footed
we will have footed
you will have footed
they will have footed
Future Continuous
I will be footing
you will be footing
he/she/it will be footing
we will be footing
you will be footing
they will be footing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been footing
you have been footing
he/she/it has been footing
we have been footing
you have been footing
they have been footing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been footing
you will have been footing
he/she/it will have been footing
we will have been footing
you will have been footing
they will have been footing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been footing
you had been footing
he/she/it had been footing
we had been footing
you had been footing
they had been footing
Conditional
I would foot
you would foot
he/she/it would foot
we would foot
you would foot
they would foot
Past Conditional
I would have footed
you would have footed
he/she/it would have footed
we would have footed
you would have footed
they would have footed

foot

1. A metrical unit of a group of syllables, a unit of rhythm.
2. (ft) A unit of length equal to 12 inches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foot - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle jointfoot - the part of the leg of a human being below the ankle joint; "his bare feet projected from his trousers"; "armored from head to foot"
human, human being, homo, man - any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
calcaneus, heelbone, os tarsi fibulare - the largest tarsal bone; forms the human heel
arcuate artery, arteria arcuata - curved artery in the foot
arteria digitalis, digital arteries - arteries in the hand and foot that supply the fingers and toes
arteria metatarsea, metatarsal artery - dorsal and plantar arteries to the metatarsal region of the foot
intercapitular vein, vena intercapitalis - veins connecting the dorsal and palmar veins of the hand or the dorsal and plantar veins of the foot
metatarsal vein, vena metatarsus - dorsal and plantar branches of veins serving the metatarsal region of the foot
leg - a human limb; commonly used to refer to a whole limb but technically only the part of the limb between the knee and ankle
pedal extremity, vertebrate foot - the extremity of the limb in vertebrates
pes planus, splayfoot, flatfoot - a foot afflicted with a fallen arch; abnormally flattened and spread out
instep - the arch of the foot
sole - the underside of the foot
toe - one of the digits of the foot
big toe, great toe, hallux - the first largest innermost toe
little toe - the fifth smallest outermost toe
heel - the back part of the human foot
2.foot - a linear unit of length equal to 12 inches or a third of a yard; "he is six feet tall"
linear measure, linear unit - a unit of measurement of length
in, inch - a unit of length equal to one twelfth of a foot
yard, pace - a unit of length equal to 3 feet; defined as 91.44 centimeters; originally taken to be the average length of a stride
3.foot - the lower part of anything; "curled up on the foot of the bed"; "the foot of the page"; "the foot of the list"; "the foot of the mountain"
bottom - the lowest part of anything; "they started at the bottom of the hill"
head - the top of something; "the head of the stairs"; "the head of the page"; "the head of the list"
4.foot - the pedal extremity of vertebrates other than human beingsfoot - the pedal extremity of vertebrates other than human beings
fossorial foot - foot adapted for digging as in moles
hoof - the foot of an ungulate mammal
bird's foot - the foot of a bird
webfoot - a foot having the toes connected by folds of skin
trotter - foot of a pig or sheep especially one used as food
forefoot - a front foot of a quadruped
hindfoot - a rear foot of a quadruped
paw - a clawed foot of an animal especially a quadruped
pedal extremity, vertebrate foot - the extremity of the limb in vertebrates
5.foot - lowest support of a structurefoot - lowest support of a structure; "it was built on a base of solid rock"; "he stood at the foot of the tower"
bed - a foundation of earth or rock supporting a road or railroad track; "the track bed had washed away"
raft foundation - a foundation (usually on soft ground) consisting of an extended layer of reinforced concrete
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
support - supporting structure that holds up or provides a foundation; "the statue stood on a marble support"
6.foot - any of various organs of locomotion or attachment in invertebratesfoot - any of various organs of locomotion or attachment in invertebrates
invertebrate - any animal lacking a backbone or notochord; the term is not used as a scientific classification
tube foot - tentacular tubular process of most echinoderms (starfish and sea urchins and holothurians) having a sucker at the end and used for e.g. locomotion and respiration
organ - a fully differentiated structural and functional unit in an animal that is specialized for some particular function
7.foot - travel by walking; "he followed on foot"; "the swiftest of foot"
walk - the act of walking somewhere; "he took a walk after lunch"
8.foot - a member of a surveillance team who works on foot or rides as a passenger
intelligence agent, intelligence officer, operative, secret agent - a person secretly employed in espionage for a government
9.foot - an army unit consisting of soldiers who fight on footfoot - an army unit consisting of soldiers who fight on foot; "there came ten thousand horsemen and as many fully-armed foot"
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
paratroops - infantry trained and equipped to parachute
10.foot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythmfoot - (prosody) a group of 2 or 3 syllables forming the basic unit of poetic rhythm
metrics, prosody - the study of poetic meter and the art of versification
cadence, metre, meter, measure, beat - (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse
dactyl - a metrical unit with stressed-unstressed-unstressed syllables
iamb, iambus - a metrical unit with unstressed-stressed syllables
anapaest, anapest - a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed-stressed syllables
amphibrach - a metrical unit with unstressed-stressed-unstressed syllables (e.g., `remember')
trochee - a metrical unit with stressed-unstressed syllables
spondee - a metrical unit with stressed-stressed syllables
dibrach, pyrrhic - a metrical unit with unstressed-unstressed syllables
11.foot - a support resembling a pedal extremity; "one foot of the chair was on the carpet"
leg - a cloth covering consisting of the part of a pair of trousers that covers a person's leg
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
Verb1.foot - pay for something; "pick up the tab"; "pick up the burden of high-interest mortgages"; "foot the bill"
pay - give money, usually in exchange for goods or services; "I paid four dollars for this sandwich"; "Pay the waitress, please"
2.foot - walk; "let's hoof it to the disco"
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
walk - use one's feet to advance; advance by steps; "Walk, don't run!"; "We walked instead of driving"; "She walks with a slight limp"; "The patient cannot walk yet"; "Walk over to the cabinet"
3.foot - add a column of numbers
arithmetic - the branch of pure mathematics dealing with the theory of numerical calculations
add together, add - make an addition by combining numbers; "Add 27 and 49, please!"

foot

plural noun
1. tootsies (informal) his aching arms and sore feet
noun
1. paw, pad, trotter, hoof, f%t (S.M.S.) It could trap and hurt an animal's foot.
2. bottom, end, base, foundation, lowest part, f%t (S.M.S.) Friends stood at the foot of the bed.
Related words
technical name pes
adjective pedal
drag your feet (Informal) stall, procrastinate, block, hold back, obstruct They were dragging their feet so as to obstruct political reforms.

foot

noun
The lowest or supporting part or structure:
verb
1. To go on foot:
Slang: hoof.
Idiom: foot it.
2. To move rhythmically to music, using patterns of steps or gestures:
Slang: hoof.
3. To combine (figures) to form a sum.Also used with up:
add (up), cast, sum (up), tot (up), total, totalize.
Translations
قَدَمقَدَم وِحْدَة قِياسأسْفَل الشَيئ
stopanohaspodekúpatízatáhnout
fodføddersparkebetale
piedo
jalg
jalkajalkateräkäpäläkaviomaksaa
stopalonoga
lábfejláblábazat
kaki
brekkufótur; fjallsrót; neîsti hlutifetfótur
pes
apačiaapmokėti sąskaitąatrama kojomsavalynėbūti tvirtam
apakšējā daļakalna pakājepamatspēda
stopalik dolny
picior
čeveljnogapešstopalovznožje
podnožjestopalo
fotkickasparkabetala
เท้า
chân

foot

[fʊt]
A. N (feet (pl))
1. (Anat) → pie m; [of animal, chair] → pata f
my feet are achingme duelen los pies
to get to one's feetponerse de pie, levantarse, pararse (LAm)
lady, my foot!¡dama, ni hablar!
on foota pie, andando, caminando (LAm)
to be on one's feetestar de pie, estar parado (LAm)
he's on his feet all day longestá trajinando todo el santo día, no descansa en todo el día
he's on his feet againya está recuperado or repuesto
to rise to one's feetponerse de pie, levantarse, pararse (LAm)
I've never set foot therenunca he estado allí
to set foot inside sb's doorponer los pies en la casa de algn, pasar el umbral de algn
to set foot on dry landponer el pie en tierra firme
it's wet under footel suelo está mojado
to trample sth under footpisotear algo
the children are always under my feetsiempre tengo los niños pegados
to put one's feet updescansar
to put one's best foot forwardanimarse a continuar
to get cold feetentrarle miedo a algn
to get one's foot in the doormeter el pie en la puerta
to put one's foot down (= say no) → plantarse (Aut) → acelerar
to drag one's feetdar largas al asunto, hacerse el roncero
to fall on one's feettener suerte, caer de pie
to find one's feetponerse al corriente
to have one foot in the graveestar con un pie en la sepultura
to have one's feet on the groundser realista
to put one's foot in itmeter la pata
to start off on the right footentrar con buen pie
to shoot o.s. in the footpegarse un tiro en el pie
to sit at sb's feetser discípulo de algn
to stand on one's own two feetvolar con sus propias alas
to sweep a girl off her feetenamorar perdidamente a una chica
she never put a foot wrongno cometió ningún error
it all started off on the wrong foottodo empezó mal
2. [of mountain, page, stairs, bed] → pie m
at the foot of the hillal pie de la colina
3. (= measure) → pie m
he's six foot or feet tallmide seis pies, mide un metro ochenta IMPERIAL SYSTEM
B. VT
1. (= pay) to foot the bill (for sth)pagar (algo), correr con los gastos (de algo)
2.
to foot it (= walk) → ir andando or (LAm) caminando; (= dance) → bailar
C. CPD foot brake N (Aut) → freno m de pie
foot fault N (Tennis) → falta f de saque
foot passenger Npasajero/a m/f de a pie
foot pump Nbomba f de pie
foot rot Nuñero m
foot soldier Nsoldado mf de infantería

foot

[ˈfʊt] [feet] [ˈfiːt] (pl)
n
(ANATOMY)pied m
My feet are aching → J'ai mal aux pieds.
She stamped her foot → Elle tapa du pied.
on foot → à pied
to set foot somewhere (= go) → mettre les pieds quelque part
to be on one's feet (= standing) → être debout
to rise to one's feet, to get to one's feet (= stand up) → se lever
to get back on one's feet (= recover) (after illness, bad experience)se remettre sur pied
to put one's feet up (= relax) → se détendre
to get cold feet about sth (= start feeling unsure) → être moins chaud pour qch
to find one's feet (fig)s'acclimater
to put one's foot down (= accelerate) → appuyer sur le champignon (= say no) → ne pas vouloir en entendre parler
He was going to go skiing, but his wife put her foot down → Il allait partir au ski, mais sa femme n'a pas voulu en entendre parler.
to have one's feet on the ground (= have a sensible attitude) → avoir les pieds sur terre
to keep one's feet on the ground (= have a sensible attitude) → garder les pieds sur terre
to stand on one's own two feet (= be independent) → se débrouiller seul
to land on one's feet, to fall on one's feet → retomber sur ses pieds
to put one's foot in it → mettre les pieds dans le plat
to put one's best foot forward (old-fashioned)faire de son mieux
the boot is on the other foot (British)les rôles sont inversés
to have one foot in the grave → avoir un pied dans la tombe
to be under sb's feet (= in the way) → être dans les jambes de qn
to get off on the wrong foot (= start badly) → mal commencer
he never puts a foot wrong (= never makes a mistake) → il ne commet jamais la moindre erreur
(= bottom) [bed] → pied m; [stairs] → bas m; [hill] → pied m; [page] → bas m
(= measure) → pied m (= 30.48 cm; 12 pouces)
Dave is 6 foot tall → Dave mesure un mètre quatre-vingt.
That mountain is 5000 feet high → Cette montagne fait mille six cents mètres de haut.
[animal] → patte f
The dog's foot was injured → Le chien était blessé à la patte.
vt [+ bill] → payer

foot

n pl <feet>
Fuß m; to be on one’s feet (lit, fig)auf den Beinen sein; to help somebody back (on)to their feetjdm wieder auf die Beine helfen; to get back on one’s feet (lit, fig)wieder auf die Beine kommen; the country is starting to get back on its feet againdas Land kommt langsam wieder auf die Beine; on footzu Fuß; to set foot on dry landden Fuß auf festen Boden setzen, an Land gehen; I’ll never set foot here again!hier kriegen mich keine zehn Pferde mehr her! (inf); the first time he set foot in the officeals er das erste Mal das Büro betrat; to get or rise to one’s feetaufstehen; to jump to one’s feetaufspringen; to put one’s feet up (lit)die Füße hochlegen; (fig)es sich (dat)bequem machen; he never puts a foot wrong (gymnast, dancer)bei ihm stimmt jeder Schritt; (fig)er macht nie einen Fehler; to catch somebody on the wrong foot (Sport) → jdn auf dem falschen Fuß erwischen; (fig)jdn überrumpeln; to be dying or dead on one’s feet (inf)todmüde sein
(fig uses) to put one’s foot down (= act with decision or authority)ein Machtwort sprechen; (= forbid, refuse)es strikt verbieten; (Aut) → Gas geben; to put one’s foot in itins Fettnäpfchen treten; to put one’s best foot forward (= hurry)die Beine unter den Arm nehmen; (= do one’s best)sich anstrengen; to find one’s feetsich eingewöhnen, sich zurechtfinden; to fall on one’s feetauf die Beine fallen; to have one’s or both feet (firmly) on the groundmit beiden Beinen (fest) auf der Erde stehen; to keep one’s feet on the ground (fig)beide Beine auf der Erde halten; to have one foot in the gravemit einem Bein im Grabe stehen; to get/be under somebody’s feetjdm im Wege stehen or sein; (children also)jdm vor den Füßen herumlaufen; to get off on the right/wrong footeinen guten/schlechten Start haben; to have/get one’s or a foot in the dooreinen Fuß in der Tür haben/in die Tür bekommen; to get one’s feet under the table (Brit inf) → sich etablieren; to stand on one’s own two feetauf eigenen Füßen or Beinen stehen; to sit at somebody’s feet (fig)jds Jünger sein; a nice area, my foot! (inf)und das soll eine schöne Gegend sein!
(of stocking, list, page, stairs, hill, sewing machine etc)Fuß m; (of bed)Fußende nt
(Measure) → Fuß m; 3 foot or feet wide/long3 Fuß breit/lang; he’s 6 foot 3˜ er ist 1,90 m
(Poet) → (Vers)fuß m
no pl (Mil) → Infanterie f; the 15th footdas 15. Infanterieregiment; ten thousand foot (Brit) → zehntausend Fußsoldaten pl
vt
to foot it (inf: = walk) → marschieren (inf)

foot

:
foot bath
nFußbad nt
footboard
n (Rail, on coach) → Trittbrett nt
foot brake
nFußbremse f
footbridge

foot

:
footfall
nSchritt m
foot fault
n (Tennis) → Fußfehler m
footgear
nFußbekleidung f
foothills
pl(Gebirgs)ausläufer pl
foothold
nStand m, → Halt m; (fig)sichere (Ausgangs)position; he got or gained a foot on the rocker fand mit den Füßen Halt am Felsen; to establish or gain a foot (fig)Fuß fassen; to lose one’s foot (lit, fig)den Halt verlieren

foot

:
footloose
adjungebunden, unbeschwert; foot and fancy-freefrei und ungebunden
footman
nLakai m
footmark
nFußabdruck m
footnote
nFußnote f; (fig)Anmerkung f
footpace
nSchritttempo nt; at a footim Schritt
footpath
n
(= path)Fußweg m
(Brit: = pavement) → Bürgersteig m
footplate
nFührerstand m
footplate men, footplate workers
foot-pound
n britische Maßeinheit für Drehmoment und Energie
footprint
nFußabdruck m; (fig, of machine) → Stellfläche f, → Grundfläche f
footprints
plFußspuren pl
foot pump
nFußpumpe f, → Blasebalg m
footrest
nFußstütze f
foot rot
n (Vet) → Fußfäule f
foot save
n (Sport) → Fußabwehr f

foot

:
footslog
vi (inf)latschen (inf), → marschieren
footslogger
n (Mil sl) → Fußsoldat m, → Infanterist m; foots (Mil sl) → Fußvolk nt; (inf: = walkers) → Spaziergänger pl, → Tippler pl (inf)
foot soldier
nFußsoldat m, → Infanterist m
footsore
adj to be footwunde Füße haben
footstalk
n (Bot) → Stängel m, → Stiel m
footstep
nSchritt m ? follow
footstool
nSchemel m, → Fußbank f
footwear
nSchuhe pl, → Schuhwerk nt
footwork
n no pl (Sport) → Beinarbeit f; (fig)Manöver pl

foot

[fʊt]
1. n (feet (pl))
a. (gen) → piede m; (of animal) → zampa; (of page, stairs) → fondo
on foot → a piedi
to be on one's feet → essere in piedi (after illness) → essersi rimesso/a
to jump/rise to one's feet → balzare/alzarsi in piedi
it's wet under foot → è bagnato per terra
b. (fig) (phrases) to fall on one's feetcadere in piedi
to find one's feet → ambientarsi
to get cold feet → avere fifa
to get under sb's feet → stare tra i piedi a qn
to have one foot in the grave → avere un piede nella fossa
to put one's foot down (say no) → imporsi (Aut) → schiacciare l'acceleratore
to get a foot in the door → fare il primo passo
to put one's foot in it → fare una gaffe
to put one's feet up (fam) → riposarsi
I've never set foot there → non ci ho mai messo piede
to put one's best foot forward (hurry) → sbrigarsi
to get off on the right/wrong foot → partire col piede giusto/sbagliato
she didn't put a foot wrong → non ha fatto neanche un errore
c. (measure) → piede m (= 304 mm or 12 inches)
he's 6 foot or feet tall → è alto 1 metro e 80
2. vt to foot the bill (fam) → pagare il conto

foot

(fut) plural feet (fiːt) noun
1. the part of the leg on which a person or animal stands or walks. My feet are very sore from walking so far.
2. the lower part of anything. at the foot of the hill.
3. (plural often foot ; often abbreviated to ft when written) a measure of length equal to twelve inches (30.48 cm). He is five feet/foot six inches tall; a four-foot wall.
ˈfooting noun
1. balance. It was difficult to keep his footing on the narrow path.
2. foundation. The business is now on a firm footing.
ˈfootball noun
1. a game played by kicking a large ball. The children played football; (also adjective) a football fan.
2. the ball used in this game.
ˈfoothill noun
a small hill at the foot of a mountain. the foothills of the Alps.
ˈfoothold noun
a place to put one's feet when climbing. to find footholds on the slippery rock.
ˈfootlight noun
(in a theatre) a light which shines on the actors etc from the front of the stage.
ˈfootmanplural ˈfootmen noun
a male servant wearing a uniform. The footman opened the door.
ˈfootmark noun
a footprint. He left dirty footmarks.
ˈfootnote noun
a note at the bottom of a page. The footnotes referred to other chapters of the book.
ˈfootpath noun
a path or way for walking, not for cars, bicycles etc. You can go by the footpath.
ˈfootprint noun
the mark or impression of a foot. She followed his footprints through the snow.
ˈfootsore adjective
with painful feet from too much walking. He arrived, tired and footsore.
ˈfootstep noun
the sound of a foot. She heard his footsteps on the stairs.
ˈfootwear noun
boots, shoes, slippers etc. He always buys expensive footwear.
follow in someone's footsteps
to do the same as someone has done before one. When he joined the police force he was following in his father's footsteps.
foot the bill
to be the person who pays the bill.
on foot
walking. She arrived at the house on foot.
put one's foot down
to be firm about something. I put my foot down and refused.
put one's foot in it
to say or do something stupid. I really put my foot in it when I asked about his wife – she had just run away with his friend!

foot

قَدَم chodidlo fod Fuß πόδι pie jalka pied stopalo piede voet fot stopa ступня fot เท้า ayak chân

foot

n. pie;
athlete's ______ de atleta;
flat ______ plano.

foot

n (pl feet) pie m; (unit of measure) 0,3048 metros; club — pie zambo, malformación congénita del pie; diabetic — pie diabético