ate


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A·te

 (ā′tē, ä′tē, ä′tā)
n. Greek Mythology
The goddess of criminal rashness and consequent punishment.

[Greek Ātē, personification of ātē, fault, error.]

ate

 (āt)
v.
Past tense of eat.

ate

(ɛt; eɪt)
vb
the past tense of eat

Ate

(ˈeɪtɪ; ˈɑːtɪ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a goddess who makes men blind so that they will blunder into guilty acts
[C16: via Latin from Greek atē a rash impulse]

ate

(eɪt; Brit. ɛt)

v.
pt. of eat.

A•te

(ˈeɪ ti, ˈɑ ti)

n.
an ancient Greek goddess personifying the fatal blindness or recklessness that leads to ruinous actions.
[< Greek átē]

-ate1

,
a suffix occurring orig. in loanwords from Latin, as adjectives (literate; passionate), nouns (candidate; prelate), and esp. past participles of verbs, which in English may function as verbs or adjectives (consecrate; considerate; translate); now used also as a verb-forming suffix in English (calibrate; hyphenate).
[< Latin -ātus, orig. =-ā- stem vowel of verbs + -t- past participle suffix]

-ate2

,
a specialization of -ate1, used to form the names of salts corresponding to acids whose names end in -ic: nitrate; sulfate.

-ate3

,
a suffix occurring orig. in nouns borrowed from Latin that denote offices or functions (consulate; triumvirate), as well as institutions or collective bodies (electorate; senate); sometimes extended to denote a person who exercises such a function (magistrate; potentate), an associated place (consulate), or a period of office or rule (protectorate); now joined to stems of any origin and denoting the office, term of office, or territory of a ruler or official (caliphate; khanate).
[< Latin -ātus (genitive -ātūs), generalized from v. ders]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Ate - goddess of criminal rashness and its punishment
Translations

eat

(iːt) past tense ate (et eit; (American) eit) : past participle ˈeaten verb
to (chew and) swallow; to take food. They are forbidden to eat meat; They ate up all the cakes; We must eat to live.
ˈeatable (negative uneatable) adjective
fit to be eaten. The meal was scarcely eatable.
noun
(in plural) food. Cover all eatables to keep mice away.
eat into
to destroy or waste gradually. Acid eats into metal; The school fees have eaten into our savings.
eat one's words
to admit humbly that one was mistaken in saying something. I'll make him eat his words!

ate

pret de eat
References in classic literature ?
Pinocchio ate one pear in a twinkling and started to throw the core away, but Geppetto held his arm.
Muffin's house came first, and as his wheelbarrow stood in the front yard the little girl ate that first.
Over led her into the house, where she ate the piano, which was of an excellent flavor.
He knew only that the velvet-furred kitten was meat, and he ate and waxed happier with every mouthful.
The other portion killed and ate his own kind, or was killed and eaten by his own kind.
Those of the household Jerry recognized as slaves or servants to Agno, and he knew when they fed him that the food he ate proceeded from Agno and was Agno's food.
Wherefore, he alone of all Somo, barred rigidly by taboo, ate megapode eggs.
The acid bite of belly desire had long since deserted him, and he, too, ate from a sense of duty, all meat tasting alike to him.
The taboo of the dog, as he expounded it, had prevented him from interfering with the taboo dog when it ate the taboo egg-layers.
When the Doctor stopped speaking and sat down, all the monkeys clapped their hands a long time and said to one another, "Let it be remembered always among our people that he sat and ate with us, here, under the trees.
There it is-- look--where the Good White Man sat and ate food with us in the Year of the Great Sickness
Then the dog snapped it up, and scrambled away with it into a corner, where he soon ate it all up.