atmospherics


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at·mos·pher·ics

 (ăt′mə-sfîr′ĭks, -sfĕr′-)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb)
a. Electromagnetic radiation produced by natural phenomena such as lightning.
b. Radio interference produced by electromagnetic radiation. Also called sferics.
2. (used with a pl. verb)
a. Features, events, or statements intended to create a particular mood or attitude: "[This book] is full of fiction unconcerned with spooky atmospherics or suspense; most of the collection's stories are about cruel humans and the violence they commit" (Ken Tucker).
b. The mood or attitude so created.

atmospherics

(ˌætməsˈfɛrɪks)
pl n
1. (Physical Geography) electrical disturbances produced in the atmosphere by natural causes such as lightning
2. (Electronics) radio interference, heard as crackling or hissing in receivers, caused by electrical disturbance

at•mos•pher•ics

(ˌæt məsˈfɛr ɪks, -ˈfɪər-)

n.
1. (used with a pl. v.) noise in a radio receiver or spots or bands on the screen of a television receiver, caused by interference from natural electromagnetic disturbances in the atmosphere.
2. (used with a sing. v.) the study of such phenomena.
3. (used with a pl. v.) mood or atmosphere; ambience.
[1900–05]

atmospherics

1. the sound, usually a crackling noise, heard over a radio receiver and caused by electromagnetic disturbances in the atmosphere; static.
2. the natural phenomena that create this disturbance.
See also: Atmosphere
special effects, extras, and the like used in order to establish an intended background or mood for a film.
See also: Films
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atmospherics - a crackling or hissing noise caused by electrical interference
interference, noise, disturbance - electrical or acoustic activity that can disturb communication
radio noise - static at radio wavelengths
Translations

atmospherics

[ˌætməsˈferɪks] NPL (Rad) → interferencias fpl

atmospherics

[ˌætməsˈfɛrɪks] n (RADIO, TV) (= interference) → parasites mpl

atmospherics

pl (Rad) → atmosphärische Störungen pl

atmospherics

[ˌætməsˈfɛrɪks] npl (Radio) → scariche fpl elettriche
References in periodicals archive ?
Global Atmospherics, the world authority in lightning detection technology for more than 25 years, specializes in equipment and services that provide reliable warning, tracking, mapping and analysis of cloud-to-ground and cloud lightning.
The grand-daddies of psychedelic boogie may talk heavy anthems on time and space, love and freedom, but what they like best is playing live and their loyal fans are here for a good old-fashioned headbang, intoxicated on atmospherics.
Global Atmospherics, the world authority in lightning detection technology for 25 years, specializes in equipment and data services that provide reliable warning, tracking, mapping and analysis of cloud and cloud-to-ground lightning.
It could be that Michael Stipe--an executive producer of Todd Haynes's Velvet Goldmine--has been absorbing the uneasy atmospherics of early Roxy Music or that Peter Buck's instrumental side project Tuatara has given this guitarist a taste of the textures that can be achieved when rock bravado is abandoned.
While its last film, based on Susan Hill's novel, got its scares from creepy atmospherics, this one abandons ambience to pummel us with boo
There was more focus than ever on James Graham's plaintive and powerful vocals, backed only by the subtle atmospherics of guitar and keyboard.
Sherwood's dub effects were allowed to cut loose on tracks such as Vanity Kills and the incredible Codex but really shone on the brooding atmospherics of Apocalypse Hotel, which came over like Nine Inch Nails at their most menacing.
You always know what's coming with Enya and here it is again - string-plucking, chorale-blossoming, grandiose atmospherics.
There are reminders here of Ravel's Daphnis and Chloe, as well as the subtle atmospherics of Debussy and the energetic angularity of Stravinsky.
Despite mixing the mordant wit of Morrissey, the lush atmospherics of the Blue Nile and, like Elvis Costello in his prime, songs that ache like open-heart surgery with a rusty spoon, Eitzel always languished below the critical radar.
Thomas Scheibitz, whose crisp facture and acidic palette may not immediately seem to claim the psychological weight of Tuymans's saturnine atmospherics, shows himself to be a master visual composer with just as incisive a viewpoint as his older colleague.
Spyboy, her backing band, proved capable of rocking and approximating the atmospherics of her recent collaborator Daniel Lanois with equal panache.