atomic age


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Related to atomic age: nuclear age, space age

atomic age

also Atomic Age
n.
The current era as characterized by the discovery, technological applications, and sociopolitical consequences of nuclear energy.

atomic age

n
(Historical Terms) the atomic age the current historical period, initiated by the development of the first atomic bomb towards the end of World War II and now marked by a balance of power between nations possessing the hydrogen bomb and the use of nuclear power as a source of energy
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The Atomic Age became the Age of Technology and Information.
They remember the atomic age, the Korean War, the Cold War, the many peacekeeping missions from 1945 to 2006, the jet age and the moon landing.
This debate, however, is not new, but one that traces back to the start of the atomic age.
In other words, Mailer and Jones, despite living in the atomic age, were able to narrate death on the battlefields with no nuclear weapons introduced, but Hemingway was not.
Trump's language could easily be misunderstood - he didn't say precisely what would lead to "fire and fury" except for North Korea's "threats"- and the upshot could be miscalculation or, heaven forbid, the kind of accidental entry into conflict that has haunted the globe since the dawn of the atomic age.
The non-profit International Uranium Film Festival - the Atomic Age Cinema Fest - was founded in 2010, a few months before the Fukushima nuclear accident in Rio de Janeiro to show films about the risks of nuclear power and radioactivity.
Nowhere else in the world have people confronted the residual burden of the atomic age.
president to visit Hiroshima, didn't apologize for the bombing, which ushered in the atomic age and the dread it posed for humanity's future.
Equal parts cocktail jazz, hazy Americana and Atomic Age bop, as well as a love letter to New York in all its hopeful, post-war glory.
It cost PS35 million to build the station, which housed four reactors, and it was seen as the start of Britain's new atomic age.
Bigger Bombs for a Brighter Tomorrow: The Strategic Air Command and American War Plans at the Dawn of the Atomic Age, 1945-1950
Throughout the 1950s, governments on either side of the Atlantic invested heavily in both aspects of nuclear technology, civilian as well as military, setting in motion sophisticated public relations exercises in order to sell the atomic age to the masses.