atrocious


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

a·tro·cious

 (ə-trō′shəs)
adj.
1. Extremely evil or cruel; monstrous: an atrocious crime.
2. Exceptionally bad; abominable: atrocious decor; atrocious behavior.

[From Latin atrōx, atrōc-, frightful, cruel; see āter- in Indo-European roots.]

a·tro′cious·ly adv.
a·tro′cious·ness n.

atrocious

(əˈtrəʊʃəs)
adj
1. extremely cruel or wicked; ruthless: atrocious deeds.
2. horrifying or shocking: an atrocious road accident.
3. informal very bad; detestable: atrocious writing.
[C17: from Latin ātrōx dreadful, from āter black]
aˈtrociously adv
aˈtrociousness n

a•tro•cious

(əˈtroʊ ʃəs)

adj.
1. extremely wicked or brutal: an atrocious crime.
2. shockingly bad: atrocious manners.
[1660–70; < Latin atrōx, s. atrōci- frightful, fierce]
a•tro′cious•ly, adv.
a•tro′cious•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.atrocious - shockingly brutal or cruelatrocious - shockingly brutal or cruel; "murder is an atrocious crime"; "a grievous offense against morality"; "a grievous crime"; "no excess was too monstrous for them to commit"
evil - morally bad or wrong; "evil purposes"; "an evil influence"; "evil deeds"
2.atrocious - exceptionally bad or displeasingatrocious - exceptionally bad or displeasing; "atrocious taste"; "abominable workmanship"; "an awful voice"; "dreadful manners"; "a painful performance"; "terrible handwriting"; "an unspeakable odor came sweeping into the room"
bad - having undesirable or negative qualities; "a bad report card"; "his sloppy appearance made a bad impression"; "a bad little boy"; "clothes in bad shape"; "a bad cut"; "bad luck"; "the news was very bad"; "the reviews were bad"; "the pay is bad"; "it was a bad light for reading"; "the movie was a bad choice"
3.atrocious - provoking horroratrocious - provoking horror; "an atrocious automobile accident"; "a frightful crime of decapitation"; "an alarming, even horrifying, picture"; "war is beyond all words horrible"- Winston Churchill; "an ugly wound"
alarming - frightening because of an awareness of danger

atrocious

adjective
1. (Informal) shocking, terrible, appalling, horrible, horrifying, grievous, execrable, detestable The food here is atrocious.
shocking fine, admirable, tasteful
2. cruel, savage, brutal, vicious, ruthless, infamous, monstrous, wicked, barbaric, inhuman, diabolical, heinous, flagrant, infernal, fiendish, villainous, nefarious, godawful (slang), hellacious (U.S. slang) The treatment of the prisoners was atrocious.
cruel good, kind, gentle, generous, honourable, humane, civilized, merciful

atrocious

adjective
1. Disgracefully and grossly offensive:
Archaic: enormous.
2. Extremely unpleasant to the senses or feelings:
Translations
فَظيع، سَيّء جِداًوَحْشي، أثيم، مُرَوِّع
atroç
brutálnístrašnýsurovýúděsný
frygteliggrusomrædselsfuld
hirveäjulma
grimmilegur, hryllilegurskelfilegur, hörmulegur
kraupusžiaurenybėžiaurumasžiaurusžiaurus nusikaltimas
drausmīgsnežēlīgsšausmīgszvērīgs
atroce

atrocious

[əˈtrəʊʃəs] ADJ
1. (= shocking) [crime, treatment] → atroz
2. (= very bad) [film, food, spelling] → pésimo, espantoso; [weather] → espantoso

atrocious

[əˈtrəʊʃəs] adj (= very bad) [food, weather, accent, conditions, crimes] → atroce, exécrable

atrocious

adj, atrociously
advgrauenhaft

atrocious

[əˈtrəʊʃəs] adjatroce, pessimo/a

atrocious

(əˈtrəuʃəs) adjective
1. very bad. Your handwriting is atrocious.
2. extremely cruel. an atrocious crime.
aˈtrociousness noun
atrocity (əˈtrosəti) noun
an extremely cruel and wicked act. The invading army committed many atrocities.
References in classic literature ?
In the midst of them, the hangman, ever busy and ever worse than useless, was in constant requisition; now, stringing up long rows of miscellaneous criminals; now, hanging a housebreaker on Saturday who had been taken on Tuesday; now, burning people in the hand at Newgate by the dozen, and now burning pamphlets at the door of Westminster Hall; to-day, taking the life of an atrocious murderer, and to-morrow of a wretched pilferer who had robbed a farmer's boy of sixpence.
This was no calumny, and yet I remember well, somewhere far back in the late seventies, that the crew of that ship were, if anything, rather proud of her evil fame, as if they had been an utterly corrupt lot of desperadoes glorying in their association with an atrocious creature.
Rose had formerly belonged to one of the gangs of pirates who infested the islands of the Mississippi, plundering boats as they went up and down the river, and who sometimes shifted the scene of their robberies to the shore, waylaying travellers as they returned by land from New Orleans with the proceeds of their downward voyage, plundering them of their money and effects, and often perpetrating the most atrocious murders.
Next time, or the time after next, a telling stroke would be delivered-something really startling - a blow fit to open the first crack in the imposing front of the great edifice of legal conceptions sheltering the atrocious injustice of society.
There is a vestige of decency, a sense of shame, that does much to curb and check those outbreaks of atrocious cruelty so commonly enacted upon the plantation.
The hardened shameless depravity of the whole composition, from beginning to end--the atrocious perversity of mind which persistently associated me with a calamity for which I was in no sense answerable, and with a death which I had risked my life in trying to avert--so disgusted me, that I was on the point of tearing the letter, when a consideration suggested itself which warned me to wait a little before I destroyed it.
But then I couldn't, with any respect for her, tell her the trout's message, or, with any respect for myself, recall those atrocious doggerel lines.
His favourite subjects were church discipline, rites and ceremonies, apostolical succession, the duty of reverence and obedience to the clergy, the atrocious criminality of dissent, the absolute necessity of observing all the forms of godliness, the reprehensible presumption of individuals who attempted to think for themselves in matters connected with religion, or to be guided by their own interpretations of Scripture, and, occasionally (to please his wealthy parishioners) the necessity of deferential obedience from the poor to the rich--supporting his maxims and exhortations throughout with quotations from the Fathers: with whom he appeared to be far better acquainted than with the Apostles and Evangelists, and whose importance he seemed to consider at least equal to theirs.
Thanks to the atrocious suspicion which makes him ashamed of being seen with his wife, he has led the very life which makes the proposed enterprise easy of accomplishment.
To say the truth, some of that atrocious wickedness in Jones, of which we have just mentioned three examples, might perhaps be derived from the encouragement he had received from this fellow, who, in two or three instances, had been what the law calls an accessary after the fact: for the whole duck, and great part of the apples, were converted to the use of the gamekeeper and his family; though, as Jones alone was discovered, the poor lad bore not only the whole smart, but the whole blame; both which fell again to his lot on the following occasion.
What's her name would have had her atrocious way with very little trouble even if the excellent Fynes had been able to do something.
One of these paragraphs tells about a quarrel between the Czar of Russia and his eldest son, twenty-one and a half lines; and the other tells about the atrocious destruction of a peasant child by its parents, forty lines, or one-fifth of the total of the reading-matter contained in the paper.