attempted


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at·tempt

 (ə-tĕmpt′)
tr.v. at·tempt·ed, at·tempt·ing, at·tempts
1. To try to perform, make, or achieve: attempted to read the novel in one sitting; attempted a difficult dive.
2. Archaic To tempt.
3. Archaic To try to seize or get control of by attacking.
n.
1. An effort or a try.
2. An attack; an assault: an attempt on someone's life.

[Middle English attempten, from Old French attempter, from Latin attemptāre : ad-, ad- + temptāre, to test.]

at·tempt′a·ble adj.
at·tempt′er n.

attempted

(əˈtɛmptɪd)
adj
used to describe an action that someone has unsuccessfully tried to carry out
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.attempted - tried unsuccessfully; "attempted murder"
unsuccessful - not successful; having failed or having an unfavorable outcome

attempted

verb tried, ventured, undertaken, endeavoured, assayed a case of attempted murder
Translations

attempted

[əˈtemptɪd] ADJ attempted murdertentativa f de asesinato, intento m de asesinato
attempted suicideintento m de suicidio

attempted

[əˈtɛmptɪd] adj
attempted murder → tentative f de meurtre
attempted suicide → tentative f de suicide
attempted theft → tentative f de vol
References in classic literature ?
It would have been idle for me to have attempted resuming the interview so peremptorily terminated by Marnoo, who was evidently little disposed to compromise his own safety by any rash endeavour to ensure mine.
They might have copied the second article of the existing Confederation, which would have prohibited the exercise of any power not EXPRESSLY delegated; they might have attempted a positive enumeration of the powers comprehended under the general terms "necessary and proper"; they might have attempted a negative enumeration of them, by specifying the powers excepted from the general definition; they might have been altogether silent on the subject, leaving these necessary and proper powers to construction and inference.
Very clumsily attempted, but attempted murder none the less.
The dissertations are the only part in which an exact translation has been attempted, and even in those abstracts are sometimes given instead of literal quotations, particularly in the first; and sometimes other parts have been contracted.
She attempted to relate what she had heard to her good friend and protectress.
Only man could have placed that collar there, and as no race of Martians of which we knew aught ever had attempted to domesticate the ferocious apt, he must belong to a people of the north of whose very existence we were ignorant--possibly to the fabled yellow men of Barsoom; that once powerful race which was supposed to be extinct, though sometimes, by theorists, thought still to exist in the frozen north.
Still bent, however, on pushing forward, they attempted to climb the opposing mountains; and struggled on through the snow for half a day until, coming to where they could command a prospect, they found that they were not half way to the summit, and that mountain upon mountain lay piled beyond them, in wintry desolation.
The child (a little boy, apparently about five years old) scrambled up to the top of the wall, and called again and again; but finding this of no avail, apparently made up his mind, like Mahomet, to go to the mountain, since the mountain would not come to him, and attempted to get over; but a crabbed old cherry-tree, that grew hard by, caught him by the frock in one of its crooked scraggy arms that stretched over the wall.
In that very village he had hanged five for theft and attempted desertion.
He came back, clawing frantically up the slope that gave him little footing; and he came back, no longer with poorly attempted simulation of ferocity, but impelled by the first flickerings of real ferocity.
Many knights had come from afar to try their luck, but it was in vain they attempted to climb the mountain.
But a kind of continuation of the Tales of my Landlord had been recently attempted by a stranger, and it was supposed this Dedicatory Epistle might pass for some imitation of the same kind, and thus putting enquirers upon a false scent, induce them to believe they had before them the work of some new candidate for their favour.