attic


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At·tic

 (ăt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of ancient Attica, Athens, or the Athenians.
2. Characterized by purity, simplicity, and elegant wit: Attic prose.
n.
The ancient Greek dialect of Attica, in which the bulk of classical Greek literature is written.

[Latin Atticus, from Greek Attikos, from Attikē, Attica.]

at·tic

 (ăt′ĭk)
n.
1. A story or room directly below the roof of a building, especially a house.
2. A low wall or story above the cornice of a classical façade.

[From Attic story, story of a building enclosed by one decorative structure placed above another, much taller decorative structure, usually involving the Attic order, an architectural order having square columns of any of the basic five orders, from French attique, from attique, Attic, from Latin Atticus; see Attic.]

attic

(ˈætɪk)
n
1. a space or room within the roof of a house
2. (Architecture) architect a storey or low wall above the cornice of a classical façade
[C18: special use of Attic from the use of Attic-style pilasters to adorn the façade of the top storey]

Attic

(ˈætɪk)
adj
1. (Peoples) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
2. (Placename) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
3. (Languages) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
4. (Historical Terms) of or relating to Attica, its inhabitants, or the dialect of Greek spoken there, esp in classical times
5. (often not capital) classically elegant, simple, or pure: an Attic style.
n
(Languages) the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Athens: the chief literary dialect of classical Greek. See also Aeolic, Arcadic, Doric, Ionic

At•tic

(ˈæt ɪk)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Attica or to the ancient city-state of Athens, coterminous with Attica in the 6th and 5th centuries b.c.
2. (sometimes l.c.) displaying simple elegance, incisive intelligence, or delicate wit.
n.
3. the dialect of ancient Greek spoken in Attica, which became the basis for the Koine.
[1555–65]

at•tic

(ˈæt ɪk)

n.
1. the part of a building, esp. of a house, directly under a roof; garret.
2. a room or rooms in an attic.
3. a low story or decorative wall above an entablature or the main cornice of a building.
[1690–1700; special use of Attic]

Attic

 a collection of Greeks—N. Y. Times, 1983.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Attic - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roofattic - floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof; often used for storage
cockloft - a small loft or garret
storey, floor, story, level - a structure consisting of a room or set of rooms at a single position along a vertical scale; "what level is the office on?"
hayloft, mow, haymow - a loft in a barn where hay is stored
house - a dwelling that serves as living quarters for one or more families; "he has a house on Cape Cod"; "she felt she had to get out of the house"
2.Attic - the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Attica and Athens and IoniaAttic - the dialect of Ancient Greek spoken and written in Attica and Athens and Ionia
Ancient Greek - the Greek language prior to the Roman Empire
3.Attic - informal terms for a human headattic - informal terms for a human head  
human head - the head of a human being
4.attic - (architecture) a low wall at the top of the entablature; hides the roof
entablature - (architecture) the structure consisting of the part of a classical temple above the columns between a capital and the roof
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
Adj.1.Attic - of or relating to Attica or its inhabitants or to the dialect spoken in Athens in classical timesAttic - of or relating to Attica or its inhabitants or to the dialect spoken in Athens in classical times; "Attic Greek"

attic

noun loft, garret, roof space Gallons of water cascaded from the attic.
Translations
půdapodkrovní světnice
loftkvistkvistværelse
ullakkovintti
tavan
padlás
rishæî, háaloft
屋根裏
다락방
palėpė
bēniņi
manzardka
podstrešje
vind
ห้องใต้หลังคา
gác mái

attic

[ˈætɪk]
A. Ndesván m, altillo m (LAm), entretecho m (LAm)
B. CPD attic room Ndesván m, altillo m (LAm), entretecho m (LAm)

attic

[ˈætɪk] ngrenier m

Attic

adjattisch

attic

nDachboden m, → Speicher m; (lived-in) → Mansarde f; attic roomDachkammer f, → Mansarden- or Dachzimmer nt; in the atticauf dem (Dach)boden or Speicher

Attic

[ˈætɪk] adjattico/a

attic

[ˈætɪk] nsoffitta, solaio; (room) → mansarda

attic

(ˈӕtik) noun
a room at the top of a house under the roof. They store old furniture in the attic.

Attic

غُرْفَةٌ تـَحْتَ سَقْفِ البَيْت půda loft Dachboden σοφίτα ático, desván ullakko grenier tavan attico 屋根裏 다락방 zolder loft strych sótão мансарда vind ห้องใต้หลังคา tavan arası gác mái 阁楼
References in classic literature ?
While this attack lasted, the family lived in constant fear of a conflagration, for the odor of burning wood pervaded the house at all hours, smoke issued from attic and shed with alarming frequency, red-hot pokers lay about promiscuously, and Hannah never went to bed without a pail of water and the dinner bell at her door in case of fire.
The house itself shivered, from every attic of its seven gables down to the great kitchen fireplace, which served all the better as an emblem of the mansion's heart, because, though built for warmth, it was now so comfortless and empty.
The invariable moisture of my hair, while plunged in deep thought, after six cups of hot tea in my thin shingled attic, of an August noon; this seems an additional argument for the above supposition.
The attic was also unfinished--the family had been figuring that in case of an emergency they could rent this attic, but they found that there was not even a floor, nothing but joists, and beneath them the lath and plaster of the ceiling below.
Well, I'd got to talk so nice it wasn't no comfort -- I'd got to go up in the attic and rip out awhile, every day, to git a taste in my mouth, or I'd a died, Tom.
She could not hide it in the attic, for in some moment of weakness she would be sure to take it out again.
Georgiana sat on a high stool, dressing her hair at the glass, and interweaving her curls with artificial flowers and faded feathers, of which she had found a store in a drawer in the attic.
On the previous night, I had been sent straight to bed in an attic with a sloping roof, which was so low in the corner where the bedstead was, that I calculated the tiles as being within a foot of my eyebrows.
I've been up into the top attic, but there's no seeing anything for trees.
He turned them out and, having thrown his hat and cape on the table, passed through the library towards the door of his bedroom, a large octagonal chamber on the ground floor that, in his new-born feeling for luxury, he had just had decorated for himself and hung with some curious Renaissance tapestries that had been discovered stored in a disused attic at Selby Royal.
But as he was always spending money, and never made any more, at last the day came when he had nothing left but two shillings, and he had to leave the beautiful rooms in which he had been living, and go into a little attic under the roof, and clean his own boots, and mend them with a darning-needle.
They both heard a curious roly-poly noise under the attic floor.