attractancy


Also found in: Medical.

at·trac·tan·cy

 (ə-trăk′tən-sē) also at·trac·tance (-təns)
n.
The capacity, as of a pheromone, to attract.

attractancy

(əˈtræktənsɪ) or

attractance

n
(Biology) the capacity of a pheromone to attract
References in periodicals archive ?
In either case, even if the non-toxic formulation is no better or worse in terms of attractancy, there is no reason to accept the environmental hazard and waste disposal problems associated with use of the automotive formulations with the safer more economical, household product readily available.
Less than 50% of the lure evaporated during the fruit ripening period, when fruit were susceptible to fly infestation (3 months), and attractancy was maintained right until the end of the trial period (Fig.
metal or thatched roves) and number and size of windows/doors which could influence house attractancy and entry opportunities for vectors; and other human factors which could have influenced vector behaviour (e.
EFFECT OF DURATION OF AGING, CONDITION UNDER WHICH AGING OCCURRED, AND DILUTION OF GF-120 NATURALYTE[TM] FRUIT FLY BAIT ON ITS ATTRACTANCY TO WILD FEMALES OF BACTROCERA DORSALIS AND B.
Color attractancy was also reported for the closely related species, Tropinota squalida (Scop) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae), adults of which were sampled in the following numbers: white traps (229 individuals), light blue traps (189), and pink traps (108) (Ortu et al.
Additionally, there were no significant differences in attractancy to the Mediterranean fruit fly when the trimethylamine was combined with ammonium acetate/putrescine unit when compared to the 3 individual BioLure dispensers.
These differences may have been related to sunlight or other environmental factors that affect the attractancy of the yellow traps more than blue traps.