attractivity

at·trac·tive

 (ə-trăk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Pleasing to the senses or mind, as by being beautiful: plants with attractive flowers; an attractive painting.
2. Interesting because of the likelihood of being advantageous or profitable: an attractive business deal.
3. Having the power to attract: the attractive force of gravity.

at·trac′tive·ly adv.
at·trac′tive·ness n.
at·trac·tiv′i·ty n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kimball's grasp of Charles Peguy is superficial; he dwells too much on the political and proves unable to explain Peguy's attractivity for serious readers of very different philosophical positions.
In subsequent studies, we will control for possible changes in male proceptivity or attractivity by allowing the unfamiliar male to have access to (untested) females during the familiar males' exposure period.
1978), a number of laboratory and naturalistic studies have demonstrated midcycle peaks in female sexual proceptivity, receptivity, and attractivity (e.
BuddeComm has developed the ICT Investment Attractivity (ICT-IA) index as a tool for investors to identify the most attractive information and communication technology (ICT) markets in a target region, be it worldwide or, for the purpose of this report, in Africa which continues to offer the highest growth rates and return on investment (ROI).
As Romania has a lower default risk, there is an increased attractivity for investors, and investments mean economic growth and more freedom of movement for the Ministry of Finance," said Pal.
Global attractivity and periodic character of a fractional difference equation of order three.
Time of landing varied among the volunteers depending on their individual attractivity to the mosquitoes in addition to the effectiveness of the repellent.
Abstract In this paper we investigate the boundedness, the periodic character and the global attractivity of the recursive sequence
This has consequences for the attractivity and future economic competitiveness of the Sillon and calls for some form of regulation.
Therefore, the attractivity of the German nonprofit sector is not based on the business-like behaviour of its organisations; on the contrary, the sector's societal embeddedness and 'the strength of weak ties' are the main reasons why there has been a foundation boom of new organisations during the last two decades and why more and more Germans are joining voluntary o rganisations or getting involved in volunteering.
Stevic, The global attractivity of the rational difference equation [Y.