attributively


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at·trib·u·tive

 (ə-trĭb′yə-tĭv)
n.
A word or word group, such as an adjective, that is placed adjacent to the noun it modifies without a linking verb; for example, pale in the pale girl.
adj.
1. Grammar Of, relating to, or being an attributive, as an adjective.
2. Of or having the nature of an attribution or attribute.

at·trib′u·tive·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.attributively - in an attributive manner; "the genitive noun is used attributively"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
Translations

attributively

[əˈtrɪbjʊtɪvlɪ] ADVcomo atributo

attributively

advattributiv
References in periodicals archive ?
In both cases, the pronouns can be used either independently (mika what, which) or attributively, as in mika pere what family, whichever family .
Good for (non-welfare subjects): What is good for an X is that which is a (productive or constituent) means to its becoming, or remaining, an attributively good X.
This article investigates how English-speaking children interpret imperfective and perfective participles used attributively in a prenominal position, as in 'burning/burned candle'.
More specifically, I want to suggest that "The Wide Net" consciously interrogates and transforms a persistent and central paradigm in modernist constructions of masculinity, one which premises manhood on a horrified flight from female sexuality, and especially from the abiection attributively embodied--for Eliot's questing Perceval, as for Quentin Compson and Joe Christmas and Nick Adams--in manifestations of women's reproductive functions including menstruation, pregnancy, childbirth, and abortion.
However, Firth (1957) is the most quoted scholar to claim that one knows a word by the company it keeps, implying that if a student knows the other words with which a lexical item can be used, he or she knows that word (and those with which it collocates); and that on the contrary, a student may not be thought of as knowing the language and using it properly if he or she knows the meaning of all entries in a dictionary but has problems in using such seemingly synonymous words as happy and glad in the sense that the first is used both attributively and predicatively, but the second only predicatively, so that whereas the former collocates with a following noun, the latter cannot although both can collocate with a preceding linking verb (Eastwood, 1999).
As an agreement suffix attached to an adjective, -im only occurs predicatively, whereas attributively -i'is used with singular and plural reference alike.
which produces ten thousand things; attributively, they are the forms
The MED data shows that only 26% (40 tokens) of all doubly marked adjectives are used attributively.
The particle ha- is the most basic form of demonstratives for near deixis in many dialects, although it is, by itself, only used attributively, for both the ms and fs, and precedes the noun it modifies, as in ha-qalbek (Tunisian) 'this heart of yours.