attrition


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Related to attrition: Attrition bias

at·tri·tion

 (ə-trĭsh′ən)
n.
1. A rubbing away or wearing down by friction.
2.
a. A gradual reduction in number or strength because of stress or military action.
b. A gradual reduction in personnel or membership because of resignation, retirement, or death, often viewed in contrast to reduction from layoffs.
3. Roman Catholic Church Repentance for sin motivated by fear of punishment rather than by love of God.

[Middle English attricioun, regret, breaking, from Old French attrition, abrasion, from Late Latin attrītiō, attrītiōn-, act of rubbing against, from Latin attrītus, past participle of atterere, to rub against : ad-, against; see ad- + terere, to rub; see terə-1 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

at·tri′tion·al adj.

attrition

(əˈtrɪʃən)
n
1. the act of wearing away or the state of being worn away, as by friction
2. constant wearing down to weaken or destroy (often in the phrase war of attrition)
3. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) Also called: natural wastage a decrease in the size of the workforce of an organization achieved by not replacing employees who retire or resign
4. (Physical Geography) geography the grinding down of rock particles by friction during transportation by water, wind, or ice. Compare abrasion3, corrasion
5. (Theology) theol sorrow for sin arising from fear of damnation, esp as contrasted with contrition, which arises purely from love of God
[C14: from Late Latin attrītiō a rubbing against something, from Latin atterere to weaken, from terere to rub]
atˈtritional adj
attritive adj

at•tri•tion

(əˈtrɪʃ ən)

n.
1. a reduction or decrease in numbers, size, or strength.
2. a wearing down or weakening of resistance, esp. as a result of continuous pressure or harassment: a war of attrition.
3. a gradual reduction in work force as when workers retire and are not replaced.
4. the act of rubbing against something; friction.
5. a wearing down or away by friction; abrasion.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin attrītiō friction]
at•tri′tion•al, adj.
at•tri′tive (əˈtraɪ tɪv) adj.

attrition

The reduction of the effectiveness of a force caused by loss of personnel and materiel.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.attrition - erosion by frictionattrition - erosion by friction      
eating away, eroding, erosion, wearing, wearing away - (geology) the mechanical process of wearing or grinding something down (as by particles washing over it)
2.attrition - the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or iceattrition - the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or ice
rubbing, friction - the resistance encountered when one body is moved in contact with another
3.attrition - sorrow for sin arising from fear of damnationattrition - sorrow for sin arising from fear of damnation
regret, ruefulness, sorrow, rue - sadness associated with some wrong done or some disappointment; "he drank to drown his sorrows"; "he wrote a note expressing his regret"; "to his rue, the error cost him the game"
4.attrition - a wearing down to weaken or destroy; "a war of attrition"
decrease, lessening, drop-off - a change downward; "there was a decrease in his temperature as the fever subsided"; "there was a sharp drop-off in sales"
5.attrition - the act of rubbing together; wearing something down by friction
detrition, friction, rubbing - effort expended in moving one object over another with pressure

attrition

noun wearing down, harrying, weakening, harassment, thinning out, attenuation, debilitation a war of attrition against the government

attrition

noun
Theology. A feeling of regret for one's sins or misdeeds:
Translations

attrition

[əˈtrɪʃən] N
1. (= wearing away) → desgaste m
war of attritionguerra f de desgaste
2. (Ind, Univ) → amortización f de puestos

attrition

[əˈtrɪʃən] n
war of attrition → guerre f d'usure

attrition

n (lit, form)Abrieb m, → Zerreibung f; (fig)Zermürbung f; (Rel) → unvollkommene Reue, Attrition f (spec); war of attrition (Mil) → Zermürbungskrieg m

attrition

[əˈtrɪʃn] nusura (per attrito)
war of attrition → guerra di logoramento
References in classic literature ?
But the incidents of his adventure grew sensibly sharper and clearer under the attrition of thinking them over, and so he presently found himself leaning to the impression that the thing might not have been a dream, after all.
But as much movement was necessary to ascend such a great height, some of the clay would become attached to its rough skin by attrition.
This may be a war of attrition, or even now the unexpected may come, but to all effects and purposes Germany is beaten.
On the other hand, I do not believe that any line of coast, ten or twenty miles in length, ever suffers degradation at the same time along its whole indented length; and we must remember that almost all strata contain harder layers or nodules, which from long resisting attrition form a breakwater at the base.
John's river, some quartz crystals with their edges blunted from attrition, and mixed with gravel on the sea-beach.
Two research questions were addressed: 1) Is there an association between ESL status and attrition rates in nursing students in initial licensure programs within Texas?
The diamond sponsor delivered a signature presentation on attrition during the Oct.
According to the NCUA's Examiner Separation and Attrition Report, there were 594 examiners in 2012 and 62 left the agency that year, resulting in a 10.
Attrition warfare is a military strategy in which a belligerent side attempts to win a war by wearing down the enemy to the point of collapse through continuous losses in personnel and materiel.
General Kinematics Vibra-Mill attrition mills have proven performance in scores of foundries as both a total attrition mill or as a sand pre-conditioner.
Research and Markets announces the addition of " Antibody Technologies and Attrition Rates - an industry analysis 2013" to its catalogue.
4 percent this year but employee attrition is still a challenge for employers, Hay Group said on Sunday.