attrition rate


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attrition rate

A factor, normally expressed as a percentage, reflecting the degree of losses of personnel or materiel due to various causes within a specified period of time.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.attrition rate - the rate of shrinkage in size or number
rate - a magnitude or frequency relative to a time unit; "they traveled at a rate of 55 miles per hour"; "the rate of change was faster than expected"
References in periodicals archive ?
Weve seen the attrition rate creep back up and hover around 15 per cent and some universities reporting attrition rates double that average.
The data shows an overall average attrition rate for the matriculated class of 2011 and 2012 was 3.
If the acquiring institution has higher engagement than the target institution does, the attrition rate is 6%, he said.
The Indian central bank has cautioned commercial banks that they will have to put up with a high attrition rate.
While 13 percent of respondents have attrition rates in excess of 50 percent per annum, the same proportion have an attrition rate below 5 percent.
Infosys expressed worry about the high attrition rate and disappointed on the dollar revenue front as well.
Communicate to stakeholders in the business development process about the high attrition rate of ideas
Hay Group's Wendell D'Cunha, the author of the report, said:"The combination of a shortage of national talent and a focus from employers on pay as the main driver of employee retention is contributing to a high attrition rate.
Many can't access their data in a timely manner and don't have the analytic capabilities to accurately calculate their attrition rate.
An ongoing review of interviews taken from those leaving OCS prior to completion has not revealed any predominant reason for the higher attrition rates, although the physical fitness, demands are often cited.
Emma Cordiner, whose business Denalli is ideally placed at Doxford International Park, believes that the increasing demands placed upon contact centre staff can account for poor productivity, high attrition rates and spiralling costs.